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Old 05-31-2020, 07:59 PM
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Smile Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

I live in Tennessee and have a female umbrella cockatoo that I would rehome to an experienced person. She is 19. I took her in about 3 years ago from an elderly man. I had no idea what I was getting into. She requires more attention than I can give.
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Old 06-01-2020, 06:47 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

You might look at this as well- I am not sure but they get reviews online it seems-- it's a TN avian sanctuary-
https://www.facebook.com/pg/Exotic-A...=page_internal

If you re-home to an individual, I would definitely specify that they should be someone with cockatoo experience, as these birds are quite unique. I would take her if I didn't already have one
I am not feeling gutsy enough to try 2

Last edited by noodles123; 06-01-2020 at 03:57 PM.
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Old 06-17-2020, 01:15 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

Is the bird healthy and psychologically "normal"? Has the bird lived in a household with other parrots? Does it exhibit antisocial behavior toward humans of a particular gender? What part of TN are you in?
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Old 06-17-2020, 08:11 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

Quote: Originally Posted by Jazzop View Post
Is the bird healthy and psychologically "normal"? Has the bird lived in a household with other parrots? Does it exhibit antisocial behavior toward humans of a particular gender? What part of TN are you in?
Have you had an Umbrella before?
"Normal" is a relative term lol.
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Old 06-20-2020, 03:36 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
Have you had an Umbrella before?
"Normal" is a relative term lol.

Hence the "quotation marks"
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Old 06-20-2020, 07:35 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

Quote: Originally Posted by Jazzop View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
Have you had an Umbrella before?
"Normal" is a relative term lol.

Hence the "quotation marks"
but have you?
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Old 06-22-2020, 01:28 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
but have you?
Nope, just a Galah, which is completely different. But I befriended one that belonged to a neighbor.

Let me guess... you are going to lay down the typical circular rhetoric that the only people who should own X species are those who already own X species. The universalized logical conclusion of this position is that the mentally-ill bird hoarders stockpile the "difficult" species and the birds in bad situations lose many potential homes due to the bias against first-timers for that species.

I apologize if I am putting words in your mouth. But if I am incorrect, please explain why you asked me that question in the first place.
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Old 06-22-2020, 07:42 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

[quote=Jazzop;874591]
Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
but have you?

Nope, just a Galah, which is completely different. But I befriended one that belonged to a neighbor.

Let me guess... you are going to lay down the typical circular rhetoric that the only people who should own X species are those who already own X species. The universalized logical conclusion of this position is that the mentally-ill bird hoarders stockpile the "difficult" species and the birds in bad situations lose many potential homes due to the bias against first-timers for that species.
Someone has to provide homes for these birds, and every umbrella cockatoo owner was a first-time umbrella cockatoo owner at some point (excluding people who grew up with them, I suppose)....BUT, the more they get bounced around, the more trauma it causes for them...so additional, long-term experience with U2s would help you make a more informed decision about whether you actually want to adopt one. I love them dearly and I think they are fairly misunderstood, but it doesn't change the fact that it is VERY hard to give them what they need in a home environment..

NOTE: I am NOT faulting those who have to re-home their birds in order to do what is best for the bird---it takes a big person to admit when they cannot do right by their parrot...and admitting that takes an admirable level of strength and courage...that having been said, it is important for everyone to do what they can to prevent further re-homing in the future...

I asked because if you haven't owned one, having befriended one is not quite the same (as I am sure you know). It said "to experienced home" so I was curious about your experiences. A galah is a cockatoo, but they are generally the most "chill" (while still being cockatoos--so that counts for something --for sure), but as you said, a U2 is quite different). I'm not saying you CANNOT adopt a U2, but there is a lot to consider.

As you have probably heard, U2s and M2s are the most re-homed of any cockatoo species (or any other parrot type), so if someone HAS had a U2 over the age of 6 before (as babies are super low-key compared to adults), or lived with one, it often makes it more likely that they know roughly, what it may be like. Assuming they didn't re-home or lose their last, it may mean that they are less likely to struggle with the species than someone with less experience)...The OP re-homing the bird is proof that people often get in over their heads..This bird will have been re-homed at least twice by the time this goes through, but possibly more than that even...the cycle of re-homing is very common among U2s.

My intent was not to offend with my question, but statistics are the best we have (and cliches often exist for a reason)---everyone who ever had to give up their U2 thought the exact same thing when adopting him/her initially ("I've got this!")...which is repeatedly proven to be an overestimation--hence the off-the-charts stats on re-homing (even among experienced owners of other types of parrots). People wouldn't spend the money and time on a bird they didn't THINK they could handle, only to end up surrendering the bird (unless they felt it was absolutely necessary)...so, it isn't a personal bias against first-time cockatoo owners, it's a mathematical one...Since it is mathematical, there are those within the statistical minority for whom everything works out long-term, but it is important to consider that no one goes into it thinking they will have to re-home their bird... There are people who successfully live with U2s-- absolutely---but there are so many who thought they could, but didn't end up being able to do so...SO again, it isn't personal. It's really important to be introspective here and ask yourself some difficult questions, because success with a U2 is dependent on SO many things (internal, external, financial, TIME, future plans, family,travel, other pets etc).
I have read that 10% of people who adopt U2s actually end up keeping them forever, which is why a previously successful or current ownership of sexually mature U2s can be an indicator for future success in some instances -obviously, these people can't adopt all of the U2s who need homes, so logically, some new people will have to enter the scene, BUT- it is important not to be be indignant when questioned, as it has nothing to do with you, and everything to to with the re-homing crisis these birds face within the USA. Again- my goal is not to keep U2s homeless, but to ensure that when they are re-homed, it doesn't have to happen again and again.

Going back to what you thought I was going to say, sure, getting a U2 when you already have a Galah, baby Conure and Amazon certainly poses risks to all of your birds (including behavioral issues, health and the potential for reproduction between the G2 and U2--I believe they can procreate--I know cockatiels and umbrellas have done so, as have other species of cockatoo)...but that was not why I asked. You do certainly need to consider the risks of what could happen if your birds do not get along, or get along too well *cough*. Do you have the time to attend to 2 cockatoos , a baby conure and an Amazon? Tending to the cockatoos separately would require at least 4 hours a day each (8 total) and will be needed if they do not get along. Even if they do, this time will also be needed during the quarantine period of 45 days a new bird. These are just some things to ask yourself.
For your Amazon and Conure, tack on quite a few more hours on top of the 8 (in the event that they can't be out together)...

Now, the other thing to consider is the age of your Galah, Amazon and Conure-- if they aren't sexually mature, I would definitely wait before getting another bird, as they tend to change a lot when they transition to adulthood, so if yours hasn't done that yet, you really have no idea what they will be like in a few years when that does happen...your recently hatched conure probably has about 2 years to go before becoming an adult (including personality changes etc).
Even if 2 of the 3 are mature, one transitioning to adulthood could change the flock dynamic, and when you throw a new bird into that mix, it has the potential to become complicated.


Working/volunteering at a place that rescues U2s is another good way to gain experience (aside from owning one)----because then you tend to see more behavioral varieties etc than you would when visiting a friend's bird..especially if you can do it long-term for a few hours a day to where your novelty wears off to the birds. They tend to have a bit of a "honeymoon" period for a few months and they also like to show-off etc for people they don't see daily.

One really good thing about this re-home is that she is already sexually mature (at 19)---so at least you wouldn't have to deal with the transition from babyhood to puberty (which usually happens around 6 years of age for U2s). I think if you are set on getting a U2, re-homing an adult is a better option than adopting a baby. A 19-year-old bird has already developed the core of its adult personality, so within a year of adopting, you would have a pretty good idea of your bird's general tendencies (barring any massive changes within the home or behavioral missteps)...whereas, with a baby, it takes over 6 to see what they will be like in the long-run.

Last edited by noodles123; 06-22-2020 at 11:41 AM.
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Old 06-23-2020, 01:24 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

Thanks for your reasoned reply. I'm glad you didn't interpret my question as picking a fight or something.

First, to clarify, the only bird I have is a 25-year old DYH Amazon. The Galah died almost 20 years ago. I am considering adopting a Conure, but I haven't yet.

I understand your protectiveness of the cockatoo and your reasoning behind it. What I don't understand (and never have) is why people attribute such terms as "difficult", "hot three", etc. to birds. They are exactly what they are. I have never had a problem with a bird, whether mine or someone else's. It's not rocket surgery. These are well-studied animals with the added twist of a personality. I do much better with them than I do with humans. Humans are the reason why these birds live in cages in the first place and the reason why some of those caged birds suffer more than others. Unfortunately, their prognosis is grave if they were to be released in the wild, so the only practical option is to rescue them from bad situations. That is all I intend to do.
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Old 06-23-2020, 08:37 AM
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Re: Female Umbrella Cockatoo to experienced home

I like where your head is-- it sounds like you could definitely make this work.. I DO agree, they are what they are-- but most people don't know exactly what that is, and many make it worse. THEY NEED people who get them.

A really solid behavioral foundation (both in relation to the birds themselves and ABA) will take you far PLUS time..TONS OF TIME. So in that respect, it sounds like your head is in the right place. That is essential and I am glad to hear that you are thinking that way, because you have to almost be in an educator mindset for these birds...Someone who gets them, reads them, understands what can reinforce behavior (for better or for worse) etc etc. I wrote the following because it is what I thought of when I read your reply--it isn't because I think YOU don't know these things (not sure if you do or not) but this is what popped into my head, so now you get to read an unfortunate novella (again LOL)!

I should preface this again by saying that U2s are my favorite parrots- I love them so much, and their "CRAZY" behavior can be both lovable and maddening all at once (it isn't really crazy, but it feels that way sometimes. I am not trying to be down on U2s- but I think they are poor "pets" for most people (heck- they aren't pets--- they are like little dictator children with extreme needs)---I think they need their own adoption category--a category between kids, pets and prison inmates maybe lol. <3
I know about the "HOT 3" but I think U2s might very well be on-fire in comparison.

With U2s, some things that are unique would be:
1. their extreme desire to graft themselves to you (yeah- I know all birds can be needy, and lots of other birds scream for attention or fly to their people, but U2s are naturally super needy within a home and can be intense (because we can't provide the flock dynamics etc that they would have in the wild).---I have lived with and spent a lot of times with lots of birds and NEVER have I seen any species(besides u2 and m2s) SO obsessed with wanting to be with people /get that constant attention/tactile interaction-
Lots of people find this "neediness" very difficult to resist initially (because 1. if they (U2s) DO get their way, they aren't nearly as loud if they don't, and 2. because people LOVE cuddling animals and birds are cute (and it "feels" special to have a bird WANT to be with you)----but overindulging this neediness frequently creates a monster within a home (even though it is all based on instinct)- it can be hard to find the line between being attentive and overly-attentive (ESPECIALLY for people whose birds are not yet sexually mature--very easy to set an unsustainable precedent and indulge behavior that will eventually become inappropriate). Some of this neediness can be curtailed some with training, BUT it feels a lot like swimming against a current at times...that desire/instinct never goes away-- it's more about finding ways to meet their needs in ways that are more acceptable for you personally...which again, is still annoying--and again-- this is more intense than what is seen in your typical needy parrot...It can work in a home, but it requires you to bend to the bird more than the bird will ever bend to you--but don't get me wrong, YOU MUST be more stubborn than the bird--- and that takes patience...(Ultimately, you make it work for the bird in the least aversive way possible for you). Noodles is pretty "calm" as U2s go, but 1. she wouldn't be that way without constant work, 2. she used to be way worse and 3. "calm" is relative. She DEFINITELY puts on her best performances for visitors, so no one ever really sees her "true colors"

U2s also become hormonal more easily than most other types of birds (even though all birds are very hormonal, Umbrella cockatoos are like raging middle-school boys all the time), which means that all of the snuggles are actually feeding into their sexual motives (even though they want snuggles all the time) ---people have a really hard time identifying sexual cockatoo behavior because it just looks adorable and they "seem" so happy to play with boxes, get "scritches" under their wings etc.

They are like the clunky seductresses of the bird world---they win people over through their awkward and persistent charm, and then are like, "WE WILL BE TOGETHER...FOR-EV-ER AND EV-ER...or I WILL KILL YOU BECAUSE YOU TALKED TO _____"
I know this early 2000s movie gets a lot of flack for being sexist and amplifying stereotypes, but sometimes, having Noodles reminds me of "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days" (including the chill, then crazy parts lol)...only I guess I would be the "guy" in this case...and despite Noodles desire for it to be so, our relationship is not sexual LOL (at least on my end)! This is meant to be a silly comparison-- I know she is a bird etc etc. LOL

Knowing all of this is about half of the battle- the other half is meeting their needs while still teaching independence and tolerating the behaviors that pop up as a result of interventions...and that is the very very tricky part. Again, training (which often involves planned ignoring) can lead to bursts in undesirable behaviors temporarily (and that could be months). U2S REALLY do need more attention than other birds in order to be mentally content (it's their nature) and so what might seem excessive for another parrot would actually be the bare-minimum for a U2..You basically have to be a pre-school teacher forever. That having been said, TOO MUCH is also a problem...SO you have to figure out a balance between nature and what works in your home, while still working for the bird (but sometimes it takes a chunk of time to figure that out, as the bird will push back against any perceived decrease in attention).

Then you have the volume issues. Training a cockatoo to scream less and be more independent requires a lot of patience because initially (as in, many months) it often involves hours and hours of screaming on end (so loud that you can't hear people 4 ft away from you even though the bird is 1 room over). You know how life is when there is a baby in the house and everyone does everything for that baby to stay semi-content (like signs on the door saying, baby sleeping, DO NOT RING)? Or, let's all sing the "Mr. Cuddle Bug song to put baby to sleep!" Or "OMG the baby did a silly face, lets all stare at it and try to replicate the moment with great enthusiasm for 1 hour straight!"

That's what life CAN be like with a cockatoo---especially for the first year when you are still training/getting to know the bird...They are programmed to be loud, but when I refer to screaming, I mean that "ah ah ah ah" attention-seeking/ "tantrum" scream (if you will excuse my anthropimorphization). Only...a U2 can take off a finger if it wants to and a U2 can scream louder than 10 babies...and fly LOL. pesky details...

Of all the birds I have encountered, I would say that U2s and M2s are the LEAST suited for life in captivity--that's why so many of them have so many issues. It is stressful to try to smush a square hole into a round peg, BUT, they can be great if you have the time and energy (it just takes a lot of time and energy and the bird has to be on the forefront of almost everything you do).

These days, Noodles is WAY more independent than she was (but still super-needy compared to other types of parrots). Her "independence" also doesn't translate to all settings (when we visit my parents' house, she will scream for hours if she knows someone is home and they are not in the same room with her OR if she can see them and wants to be where they are--and this isn't a fear thing either---she loves it there, and no one reinforced this behavior, but it's like it resets whenever we leave and go back for a visit)....It's the same stuff she used to do at my house when I first got her, only worse, because there are more people to keep track of there and she has SERIOUS FOMO (fear of missing out).

At my house these days, she is out 90% of the time if I am here, and she will play on her cage or playstands. She can be alone in a room without screaming here (which wasn't the case for the first year after I got her when she would scream for attention ALL the time). She is still pretty demanding (but in a more acceptable way) and needs lots of random interaction and over-the-top enthusiasm from me (we sing, dance, look out the windows, talk about things in the house, play games)----really, think annoying pre-school teacher. She does still try to get my attention frequently, but I also talk to her about where I am going (using predictable words- which has helped her anticipate and be less anxious) and I talk to her from the other room if I hear her say something.
When I DON'T respond to her nice attention-seeking behaviors, that is when she will resort to worse ones and ignoring those is harder (but essential to ignore) because they are very disruptive and sometimes, downright dangerous, which is why you have to respond to the good....If you saw her right now, you would think she was super-chill always.

I am rambling, but basically, having a U2 means you have to be "ON" all the time- they NEED that positive attention, so failure to keep up with all of their quirks can lead to worse things (at the same time, TOO much attention isn't healthy either)...Then, there is the type of attention---they can't build their relationship around petting/watching TV together on your lap etc, as that is too much contact and can become sexual.

Then there is the tri-point bite and their body language (which many people find difficult to read, as many very different behaviors look similar unless you really know the individual bird.

Last edited by noodles123; 06-23-2020 at 10:17 AM.
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