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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 04-12-2019, 01:26 PM
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Re: First vet visit

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Birdmom12 this sounds so much like my recent experience! Our green cheek is coming home tomorrow and the closest avian vet won't accept new patients so we were referred to the Avian Vet at Iowa State University. It's ok, it's not that much further away from us. It sure would be nice to have an avian vet in Des Moines itself. I kinda feel like they'd do very well here.

Last edited by Shellie; 04-12-2019 at 01:30 PM.
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Old 04-12-2019, 04:31 PM
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Re: First vet visit

Well, don't be too upset. As she gets older, she may come around. My Sam is 36 and has always liked the guys better, but now he is also very close to me. I guess having him for 36 years is good for something!
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2019, 02:31 PM
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Re: First vet visit

Quote: Originally Posted by Anita1250 View Post
Well, don't be too upset. As she gets older, she may come around. My Sam is 36 and has always liked the guys better, but now he is also very close to me. I guess having him for 36 years is good for something!

I have days where I think shes warming up to me... then she lashes out I've made it a habit to walk by her cage again and treat her. Either with a walnut or a small nibble of cracker. She usually has to take it from a dish though. Shes gotten in the habit of very aggressively snatching treats from my hand. When she has her treat she chirps and gurgles away making her sweet noises. She also releases some musky sweet odor to. Whatever it is shes feeling towards me its short lived before she hisses and flares up at me again. I wish we could find a way to stop her hormonal sexual behavior. Shes still hovering down constantly. I have a feeling if we could break her of this tick she might calm down a bit.
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Old 04-16-2019, 05:27 AM
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Re: First vet visit

This time of year is usually a hormonal one. Give her a little time and it may get better. My firs husband passed away in 2003 and I remarried three years later. It took Sam almost 10 years to finally accept my new husband and develop a relationship with him. Now I call him Judas because he is so close to Roger! LOL
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2019, 10:07 AM
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Re: First vet visit

Anita,

Glad Sam came around even after 10 years. There may be hope for us yet.

I am curious about something which you or others may have input on. At her vet visit we discovered this move she does is actually her masturbating. Now that we know what this means I'm noticing some triggers to it. On the rare occasion she flies to me she will do this move on my shoulders. Many times when I pass her she does it as well. Could I be triggering her frustration? I don't pet her and in fact don't even touch her. She won't allow me to. I only feed her and clean her cage.

Any ideas?
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Old 04-20-2019, 08:29 PM
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Re: First vet visit

Must vent to others that can understand: Iím very new to the large bird world. New as in February of this year new. George (aka Georgia) doesnít like me which I know! My husband up until today thought it was all in my head. After a few dive bombs I always keep my eye on her, cautious of her behavior and a good distance. I try my best to respect her space and avoid an attack. Today she was on his shoulder he was walking around doing house work and would walk past me. I kept my eye on her and she was shockingly behaving! When it came time for her to go back to her cage for supper he had her at her cage door. I was in another room but within eye sight. Suddenly she took off for me. As her normal attacks she flew right for my face so I knew she meant business not wanting to be on my shoulder. I turned away she nailed me, I drop to the floor she swoops back around comes for me again so I swat her away expecting her to stop, nope she circles back around so I cover my head where she grabs my hand and rips into my knuckle. I know I shouldnít have reacted...but I know she means business when she flies at me like that, itís hard to stay still and calm.. My husband had to get in between us to stop the attack. Iím now left with a swollen, throbbing and bloody hand. Iím also devastated to say the least. Had I knowingly provoked the attack Iíd understand...but I was a room away minding my own business. I just donít know what to do to stop these moments from happening.
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Old 04-20-2019, 10:11 PM
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Re: First vet visit

WOW! My Amy doesn't fly,he never learned how to when he was young (never fledged) Honestly...I think I'd bring Georgia right to her CAV TOMORROW and have that young lady's sleeves shortened! ( sorry..."sleeves shortened=wings clipped ) and start from scratch! It may sound harsh but in a few months her sleeves will get long anyway.
I have never been attacked in the manner you just described and I have no clue what I would do if Amy DID do something like that...sure from time to time he will run across the floor with his arms out,rudder spread open and grab a piece of carpet
I think if you do clip her it will be much easier to try and get a bond going,or at least some kind of truce! I feel your pain!



Jim
__________________
Amy my beautiful Blue Front. Who was four months old when she picked me to go home with to her "forever" home in 4/1990.. DNA'd MALE in 2015
Jonesy, a cute Goffin 'too
that had to be rehomed :-(

And a Grey 'teil, BB...a.k.a. The Beebs
that was 18 weeks old 5/20/2016,






Rest in peace,my precious Smokey..4/2015 at 28 years young
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  #48 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2019, 01:31 AM
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Re: First vet visit

Actually, this is very simple: not sure how comfy your bird is with everything your hubbie does (that may also be a reason for some pent up energy! If they are geting into a pairbond he is just driving away the competition... nothing personal!), but the bird really did not want to go back in the cage without blowing some steam.

Staring at a bird non stop means agression: so from the birds point of vieuw you are challenging him all day long, every second you get- so yea... he is probably keyed up like nothing else because of that.

Divebombing is the perfect way to show another who is boss, and you let hem!
He came out on top- so he beat the crap about the one who had been taunting him all that time and it felt good!
(Parrots always will repeat rewarding behaviour - so building a pattern is not hard in this case.)


You have a smart bird who knows exactly what buttons to push to make you cower in a corner.
Can't blame him but I do feel sorry for you! That is not a fun relationship to have with the bird.
But they way you react to it also does not help.

Clipping his wings and taking away the power of flight may help you to build another type of relationship, but only if you get over your fear of getting hurt and stop pestering the bird.


(If it is hormonal your hubbie schould distance himself a bit - there is a lot of advise on how to do that here)

I know it usually is a vicious circle: you watch the bird because you do not trust him, the bird feels the eyes burning in the back of his neck or finds you staring at him every time he looks up and that provokes agression ( defensive or other), which makes you watch out for the bird even more which threatens or pisses the bird off even more etc..
Nervous/tense people move jerkingly and that spells out agression/ about to attack to many animals and they will defend themselves against it - sometimes by keeping a safe distance, sometimes by attacking first .

If you do not change the way you are around the bird, mutilating the feathers will not help at all! It is a tool to build another relationship, not a solution.

Last edited by ChristaNL; 04-21-2019 at 01:35 AM.
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  #49 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2019, 09:23 AM
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Re: First vet visit

What a confusing world parrots bring. I sympathize because she is a wild animal caged. However, their ticks are something I am not use to. I know I shouldn’t react when she cakes for me...in the same instance though it’s hard to retrain your body to not react. We have our work cut out for us. I think she does have a strong bond though with my husband. She does to him the moment she sees him, he can scratch her neck and chin endlessly, she lets him inspect her wings, mess in her cage...basically those two have full trust in one another. I clearly have some things to work on.
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Old 04-21-2019, 09:33 AM
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Re: First vet visit

Quote: Originally Posted by Birdmom12 View Post
Must vent to others that can understand: I’m very new to the large bird world. New as in February of this year new. George (aka Georgia) doesn’t like me which I know! My husband up until today thought it was all in my head. After a few dive bombs I always keep my eye on her, cautious of her behavior and a good distance. I try my best to respect her space and avoid an attack. Today she was on his shoulder he was walking around doing house work and would walk past me. I kept my eye on her and she was shockingly behaving! When it came time for her to go back to her cage for supper he had her at her cage door. I was in another room but within eye sight. Suddenly she took off for me. As her normal attacks she flew right for my face so I knew she meant business not wanting to be on my shoulder. I turned away she nailed me, I drop to the floor she swoops back around comes for me again so I swat her away expecting her to stop, nope she circles back around so I cover my head where she grabs my hand and rips into my knuckle. I know I shouldn’t have reacted...but I know she means business when she flies at me like that, it’s hard to stay still and calm.. My husband had to get in between us to stop the attack. I’m now left with a swollen, throbbing and bloody hand. I’m also devastated to say the least. Had I knowingly provoked the attack I’d understand...but I was a room away minding my own business. I just don’t know what to do to stop these moments from happening.
Your bird sounds like it is defending your husband as its mate. There is a likely a hormonal component at play here. Consequently, you should try your best to limit exposure to hormonal triggers (shadowy places--under furniture, boxes, huts, in pillows/blankets, under clothing), mushy foods, and cuddles are the main offenders). Also, pay attention to light-cycles (too much or too little sun can mess with hormones and consistent sleep is also important--solid 10-14 hours nightly). Finally, some birds are triggered by shreddable sea-grass-type toys. If you have these in your bird's cage, consider replacing them with the wooden chew-block types of toys (at least until you know whether they could be a potential trigger). Excessive misting with water can even cause a hormonal response in some birds (as it can simulate "spring rains").

Make sure your bird is getting plenty of time outside of his cage and lots of activity to keep him engaged/ provide an outlet for his energy.

The aforementioned suggestions for minimizing hormonal behavior apply to sexually mature birds in general (regardless of gender)--it is always best to avoid hormonal triggers (such a as shadowy places, petting down the body, too much or too little light, too much or too little sleep etc) because excessive hormonal behavior can lead to increased screaming, aggression, feather plucking and, in females, egg-laying (and potential egg-binding).

Even though your husband may be the chosen one, you and anyone else interacting with the bird must be aware of these things because petting a bird in places besides the head or neck can trigger hormones...even if they don't like the person petting them. It is also important that your husband not run to the rescue every time this happens, because then your bird is getting his attention (which it clearly craves). I would suggest that he ignore the bird when it does these things....but that's just me. When you are attacked, do your best to remain as neutral and silent as possible. Your bird WANTS a reaction. Furthermore, following an attack, no one should change what they were doing before the attack occurred--- AKA, if you were attacked when playing Scrabble with your husband, you should go back to playing scrabble with your husband.

If the bird does come after you, your husband shouldn't be picking up the bird etc...but, if he must do something, I would say that the bird should go straight to a time-out cage (following an attack) with as little eye-contact/reaction as possible (for 5 minutes or so---shorter initially, ---and I wouldn't take him out if he is screaming either). I am sure that others will have their own takes on this, but your bird clearly wants to be near your husband, and he can't do that if in time-out. Similarly, by continuing with your lives, you are showing the bird that the attack didn't have an impact.

Another point worth mentioning, is that if your husband has been inadvertently leading your bird on, the aggression may eventually shift towards him (instead of you) unless he is able to re-frame their relationship as non-sexual. Birds sometimes become frustrated and "turn" on the object of their affection.

For now, in terms of who gives treats etc, ask your husband to step back a bit and make it so that your interactions with the bird are largely positive. Try not to put yourself in a position where you know you will be bitten (at least for now). If you get bitten only when your husband is around, then try asking him to leave the room for awhile so that you can focus on the positive side of the relationship...NOTE---You must ask him to leave BEFORE the dive-bombing occurs, not after.

Last edited by noodles123; 04-21-2019 at 09:52 AM.
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