Parrot Forum Header Left  
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Community > Breeding/Raising Parrots

Breeding/Raising Parrots A place for the discussion of breeding and raising baby parrots.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 08:08 AM
Allee's Avatar
Super Moderator
Parrots:
U2-Poppy(Poppy lives with her new mommy, Misty now) CAG-Jack, YNA, Bingo, Budgie-Piper, Cockatiel-Sweet Pea Quakers-Harry, Sammy, Wilson ***Zeke (quaker) Twinkle (budgie) forever in our hearts
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Texas
Thanks: 52,825
Thanked 41,085 Times in 13,471 Posts
Allee will become famous soon enough
Re: Help!!!

Folks, please keep in mind, not all of our members have access to veterinary care. Even when the best possible course of action is an immediate appointment with a certified avian specialist, it can’t always be done.
__________________

"She is not refined. She is not unrefined. She keeps a parrot." Mark Twain
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Allee For This Useful Post:
Scott  (02-20-2019)
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 08:23 AM
EllenD's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Senegal Parrot named "Kane"; Yellow-Sided Green Cheek Conure named "Bowie"; Blue Quaker Parrot named "Lita Ford"; Cockatiel named "Duff"; 8 American/English Budgie Hybrids; Ringneck Dove named "Dylan"
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: State College, PA
Thanks: 6,495
Thanked 7,542 Times in 3,076 Posts
EllenD will become famous soon enough
Re: Help!!!

Something that I forgot to add is that the fact that BOTH of the birds living together are passing whole, undigested food in their feces obviously means that it's a contagious pathogen that they both have. That's what makes this very scary and very probably that they both have a serious Avian Viral Disease like ABV or PDD. If it was only one of them then that would be a totally different story...but unfortunately they've both got something serious going on...
__________________
"Dance Like Nobody's Watching".
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to EllenD For This Useful Post:
noodles123 (02-19-2019)
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 08:35 AM
itzjbean's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Boo, Rue, Ash & Ember - 4 cockatiels
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Iowa, USA
Thanks: 2,909
Thanked 3,689 Times in 1,627 Posts
itzjbean is on a distinguished road
Re: Help!!!

Quote: Originally Posted by wajahat View Post
i give them seed mix, friuts, boiled eggs and bread.
PLEASE HELP ANYONE!!!

You have gotten some good advice already about getting these birds disease tested. I see that you are feeding them bread, which is a big no-bo! Bread is not good for our birds to have all the time, maybe a bite here and there but having it every day can lead to problems!! Digestive problems and they don't pass it very well. No more bread!!
__________________
- Jackie, Boo Rue , Ash & Ember

See more of my flock on Instagram!
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to itzjbean For This Useful Post:
EllenD (02-19-2019), noodles123 (02-19-2019)
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 09:33 AM
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2019
Thanks: 3
Thanked 11 Times in 5 Posts
wajahat is on a distinguished road
Re: Help!!!

Since you guys have told me that this is a serious issue. I have been trying to find an avian vet or diagnostics lab from where I can get the tests done. But I can't find any where I live.
Well, everybody thank you so much for your replies, I really appreciate that.
And I'll update here if things get better or if I'm able to get the tests done.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to wajahat For This Useful Post:
Laurasea Supporting Member (02-19-2019), noodles123 (02-19-2019)
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 12:52 PM
EllenD's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Senegal Parrot named "Kane"; Yellow-Sided Green Cheek Conure named "Bowie"; Blue Quaker Parrot named "Lita Ford"; Cockatiel named "Duff"; 8 American/English Budgie Hybrids; Ringneck Dove named "Dylan"
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: State College, PA
Thanks: 6,495
Thanked 7,542 Times in 3,076 Posts
EllenD will become famous soon enough
Re: Help!!!

I wish there was something we could tell you to do at home for them, but this is one of those health issues that just isn't something that is going to be easy to do anything about without knowing what the issue causing it is...

However, what you do need to do and can do from home is to first separate these two birds into a totally separate room from your other birds, so that if they do have a Viral Disease you can at least try to protect your other birds from getting it by protecting them from the feathers, dander, etc. of these two birds. That would be the first thing I would do...

***Let's assume that they do in-fact have a Viral Disease like PDD...It's not necessarily fatal, and they can shed the disease, and getting them through this is going to be all about keeping the nourished and stress-free...So, you said that they are sitting on eggs right now, correct? [B]If I were you, and probably what any Avian Vet would tell you to do would be to not allow the eggs to hatch, because there is no way that either of these birds can feed babies at all, let alone for weeks and weeks. They aren't digesting adequate nutrition for themselves right now, so they certainly can't feed babies. I'm actually very confident and comfortable saying that if you allow the eggs to hatch and they have to feed babies, that both the parents and the babies are probably going to die of starvation/malnutrition. And I don't know if you've every hand-raised/hand-fed baby birds before, or if you have a proper Brooder to house them in, etc., but it's so difficult hand-feeding baby birds during their first 2 weeks of life, they typically die of either Aspiration of formula into their lungs, which is an instant death with babies only 1-2 weeks old due to their small lung size, or they die in a matter of days due to malnourishment or due to infections because their immune systems are not developed until they are about 2 weeks old, which is why breeders wait to pull them from the nest-box to hand-raise them until they are at least 2 weeks old, and no older than 3 weeks old...You could certainly try to pull them from the nest-box as they hatch, put them in a Brooder with an ambient temperature between 90-95 degrees F until their down-feathers grow in, then the ambient temperature can be dropped to between 80-85 degrees F until their mature feathers all grow-in, then they move into their first Weaning/Starter Cage...You'd also have to have all the hand-feeding supplies, including a cooking/candy thermometer with a metal probe so that you can ensure that the formula you're feeding them is ALWAYS between 104 degrees F and 110 degrees F, any cooler and they will die of a Fungal infection, any hotter and their Crops will burn...You'll need a commercial hand-feeding formula for baby birds, such as Kaytee or Roudybush, along with an eye-dropper to feed them for the first 2 weeks, then you can switch-over to an oral-syringe. But you have to be extremely careful to only put droplets of formula on their tongues or into their beaks and let them swallow it slowly, because it's just so easy to aspirate the formula into their lungs when they are so little...

Either way I wouldn't even attempt allowing this pair to feed the babies, because their chance of shedding any Viral disease that they have and surviving it become slim to none if they are feeding babies, and again the babies will also die because the food they will be feeding them will not be digested, so the babies won't be getting any nutrition either...If I were you, and I'm saying this as a breeder/hand-raiser of over 20 years, but I would probably try to hand-raise/hand-feed the babies from the moment they hatch, but ONLY if you have the equipment and supplies that you need, because if you don't have a Brooder or at least a homemade Brooder that can keep the chicks at the adequate ambient temperature then they don't have a chance...So if you have all of the necessary equipment to house and feed them, then I'd pull each chick as it hatches and give it a try, because allowing the parents to feed them is going to end horribly for both the parents and the babies.

As far as the parents go, all you can do is "Supportive Care", which means keeping them very well-hydrated (if you have access to an electrolyte supplement like Pedialyte that would be best, but if not then water is fine), and you need to start feeding them nutrient-dense food that is easy to digest and process...Seeds obviously aren't going to work, they are getting no nutrition at all from them when they pass whole an still in the shells...As Itzjbean already mentioned, NO MORE BREAD!!! It's nothing but sugar/carbs and it has absolutely no nutritional value to your birds...

You need to start feeding them high protein, high calorie food that is safe for them and that is easy to digest...Cooked/Scrambled Eggs are very good, you can try to grind the actual Egg-Shells into a very fine powder (mortar and pestle works best) and mix the powdered shells into the liquid eggs and then cook them, so they're getting the added Calcium, however if you don't get the shells ground into a powder that will mix well into the eggs, then the egg shell bits will just pass right out in their droppings just like the seeds do...But cooked Eggs are a good start...

***Do you have access to a commercially-sold hand-feeding formula for baby birds, such as Kaytee or Roudybush? Kaytee is probably the most-commonly sold hand-feeding formula for baby birds, and you can also buy it online...You'll not only need this if you're going to attempt to hand-feed the babies, BUT IT'S ALSO THE BEST THING YOU CAN FEED THE TWO PARENTS RIGHT NOW AS WELL...Baby bird hand-feeding formula is very nutrient rich, with lots of protein, fat, calories, and all of the amino acids/digestive enzymes added-in, along with added Probiotics, and these are going to help your birds to digest their food and absorb the nutrition for it...

If you lived in the US I would tell you to start adding a Digestive-Enzyme supplement to ALL of the food you feed the parents, because this is typically what an Avian Vet is going to suggest for birds with PDD or ABV that are not digesting their food...They are going to put them on a diet of either baby-bird hand-feeding formula multiple times a day, or a high-calorie Veterinary supplemental formula for birds, such as Emerald Critical Care. Both of these are not only very nutrient-dense and contain a ton of protein, fat, carbs, etc., but they also both contain added Digestive-Enzymes, Pre-Biotics, and Probiotics to help their bodies to digest everything they eat. You can buy supplements here made for people that are a tablet that contains both a mix of Probiotics and Digestive Enzymes that you can crush into a powder...I don't know what you have available to you or if you can order things online. If you can, then you need to order a good amount of baby-bird handfeeding formula, preferably the Kaytee Exact "High-Fat" Hand-Feeding Formula, as it contains everything that they need to sustain them while they hopefully shed the PDD or ABV virus...So you'd need to feed both of them multiple times a day with an oral syringe (if you had an Avian Vet they would "Tube-Feed" or "Crop-Feed" them with a special Crop-Needle, but you can't do that if you don't know how and don't have a Crop-Needle)...So you'll have to hand-feed the parents the formula multiple times a day just like you would the babies...Otherwise the aren't going to get enough nutrition and they are going to start losing weight quickly...
__________________
"Dance Like Nobody's Watching".
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to EllenD For This Useful Post:
noodles123 (02-19-2019), wajahat (02-19-2019)
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 01:05 PM
Laurasea's Avatar
Supporting Member
Parrots:
Ta-dah 5yr (F )Turquoise cinnamon GCC, Neptune (M) blue quaker, Penny (F )rescue green quaker, Pikachu (U) lutino quaker, Cloudy and Clear(M's) parakeets, Burt The Bird (F) GCC of 17 wonderful years p
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Florida
Thanks: 11,737
Thanked 8,154 Times in 2,839 Posts
Laurasea is on a distinguished road
Re: Help!!!

I'm sorry you have such sick birds. I hadn't seen poop that bad before. So it makes me think more acute gastritis, leaning toward bacterial like salmonella... Or viral. If it happened all of a sudden.
I wish I knew of ways to help you. But there just isn't any way with put vet help and medicine that I know of. So sorry you ate going through this. I sure hope they survive and you can find help..
__________________
May your joy be as deep as the ocean, and your sorrows as light as the foam.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Laurasea For This Useful Post:
noodles123 (02-19-2019)
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 05:08 PM
Senior Member
Parrots:
Umbrella Cockatoo- 11 years old
Join Date: Jul 2018
Thanks: 3,415
Thanked 5,814 Times in 2,342 Posts
noodles123 will become famous soon enough
Re: Help!!!

If you have a zoo or something nearby, that vet might be able to help (or a bird sanctuary?)--They would likely need to visit your birds in a neutral location (not near their birds- in case this is contagious),but maybe you could explain what you are seeing and get their opinion over the phone and set up a meeting.
Are there any long-time bird keepers in the area who you could call to ask about viral testing /medical treatments etc?

Poultry-types (chickens, geese etc) can catch PDD too, so even a farm vet might have some experience with it...Again, we just can't be certain that this is PDD without testing. That having been said, a farm vet may have seen it enough to make an educated guess if they deal with birds...If it is something else, maybe they have seen it in their birds as well. Parrots are unique in many ways, but you have to work with the resources you have, so you might call around.

I wish there was something I could do to help!


If you are unable to determine whether or not this is PDD, then I would treat them as though they have it until you know (even if you can't be sure, it isn't something you want to gamble with). Consequently, in addition to following Ellen's advice etc, I would quarantine the Alexandrines and hand-wash thoroughly between any/all of your birds (even the ones who appear to be healthy). A "carrier" can live a full life in many cases but once a bird is infected (whether or not they show symptoms) they can spread the virus to others throughout their lives. I would take extra care between handling/ feeding etc. Again, I am not a vet, but since there is a chance that this is viral, it is best to err on the side of caution.



I really hope you are able to find someone who can help.

Last edited by noodles123; 02-19-2019 at 06:32 PM.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to noodles123 For This Useful Post:
Laurasea Supporting Member (02-19-2019), wajahat (02-19-2019)
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 11:32 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2019
Thanks: 3
Thanked 11 Times in 5 Posts
wajahat is on a distinguished road
Re: Help!!!

Quote: Originally Posted by EllenD View Post
I wish there was something we could tell you to do at home for them, but this is one of those health issues that just isn't something that is going to be easy to do anything about without knowing what the issue causing it is...

However, what you do need to do and can do from home is to first separate these two birds into a totally separate room from your other birds, so that if they do have a Viral Disease you can at least try to protect your other birds from getting it by protecting them from the feathers, dander, etc. of these two birds. That would be the first thing I would do...

***Let's assume that they do in-fact have a Viral Disease like PDD...It's not necessarily fatal, and they can shed the disease, and getting them through this is going to be all about keeping the nourished and stress-free...So, you said that they are sitting on eggs right now, correct? [B]If I were you, and probably what any Avian Vet would tell you to do would be to not allow the eggs to hatch, because there is no way that either of these birds can feed babies at all, let alone for weeks and weeks. They aren't digesting adequate nutrition for themselves right now, so they certainly can't feed babies. I'm actually very confident and comfortable saying that if you allow the eggs to hatch and they have to feed babies, that both the parents and the babies are probably going to die of starvation/malnutrition. And I don't know if you've every hand-raised/hand-fed baby birds before, or if you have a proper Brooder to house them in, etc., but it's so difficult hand-feeding baby birds during their first 2 weeks of life, they typically die of either Aspiration of formula into their lungs, which is an instant death with babies only 1-2 weeks old due to their small lung size, or they die in a matter of days due to malnourishment or due to infections because their immune systems are not developed until they are about 2 weeks old, which is why breeders wait to pull them from the nest-box to hand-raise them until they are at least 2 weeks old, and no older than 3 weeks old...You could certainly try to pull them from the nest-box as they hatch, put them in a Brooder with an ambient temperature between 90-95 degrees F until their down-feathers grow in, then the ambient temperature can be dropped to between 80-85 degrees F until their mature feathers all grow-in, then they move into their first Weaning/Starter Cage...You'd also have to have all the hand-feeding supplies, including a cooking/candy thermometer with a metal probe so that you can ensure that the formula you're feeding them is ALWAYS between 104 degrees F and 110 degrees F, any cooler and they will die of a Fungal infection, any hotter and their Crops will burn...You'll need a commercial hand-feeding formula for baby birds, such as Kaytee or Roudybush, along with an eye-dropper to feed them for the first 2 weeks, then you can switch-over to an oral-syringe. But you have to be extremely careful to only put droplets of formula on their tongues or into their beaks and let them swallow it slowly, because it's just so easy to aspirate the formula into their lungs when they are so little...

Either way I wouldn't even attempt allowing this pair to feed the babies, because their chance of shedding any Viral disease that they have and surviving it become slim to none if they are feeding babies, and again the babies will also die because the food they will be feeding them will not be digested, so the babies won't be getting any nutrition either...If I were you, and I'm saying this as a breeder/hand-raiser of over 20 years, but I would probably try to hand-raise/hand-feed the babies from the moment they hatch, but ONLY if you have the equipment and supplies that you need, because if you don't have a Brooder or at least a homemade Brooder that can keep the chicks at the adequate ambient temperature then they don't have a chance...So if you have all of the necessary equipment to house and feed them, then I'd pull each chick as it hatches and give it a try, because allowing the parents to feed them is going to end horribly for both the parents and the babies.

As far as the parents go, all you can do is "Supportive Care", which means keeping them very well-hydrated (if you have access to an electrolyte supplement like Pedialyte that would be best, but if not then water is fine), and you need to start feeding them nutrient-dense food that is easy to digest and process...Seeds obviously aren't going to work, they are getting no nutrition at all from them when they pass whole an still in the shells...As Itzjbean already mentioned, NO MORE BREAD!!! It's nothing but sugar/carbs and it has absolutely no nutritional value to your birds...

You need to start feeding them high protein, high calorie food that is safe for them and that is easy to digest...Cooked/Scrambled Eggs are very good, you can try to grind the actual Egg-Shells into a very fine powder (mortar and pestle works best) and mix the powdered shells into the liquid eggs and then cook them, so they're getting the added Calcium, however if you don't get the shells ground into a powder that will mix well into the eggs, then the egg shell bits will just pass right out in their droppings just like the seeds do...But cooked Eggs are a good start...

***Do you have access to a commercially-sold hand-feeding formula for baby birds, such as Kaytee or Roudybush? Kaytee is probably the most-commonly sold hand-feeding formula for baby birds, and you can also buy it online...You'll not only need this if you're going to attempt to hand-feed the babies, BUT IT'S ALSO THE BEST THING YOU CAN FEED THE TWO PARENTS RIGHT NOW AS WELL...Baby bird hand-feeding formula is very nutrient rich, with lots of protein, fat, calories, and all of the amino acids/digestive enzymes added-in, along with added Probiotics, and these are going to help your birds to digest their food and absorb the nutrition for it...

If you lived in the US I would tell you to start adding a Digestive-Enzyme supplement to ALL of the food you feed the parents, because this is typically what an Avian Vet is going to suggest for birds with PDD or ABV that are not digesting their food...They are going to put them on a diet of either baby-bird hand-feeding formula multiple times a day, or a high-calorie Veterinary supplemental formula for birds, such as Emerald Critical Care. Both of these are not only very nutrient-dense and contain a ton of protein, fat, carbs, etc., but they also both contain added Digestive-Enzymes, Pre-Biotics, and Probiotics to help their bodies to digest everything they eat. You can buy supplements here made for people that are a tablet that contains both a mix of Probiotics and Digestive Enzymes that you can crush into a powder...I don't know what you have available to you or if you can order things online. If you can, then you need to order a good amount of baby-bird handfeeding formula, preferably the Kaytee Exact "High-Fat" Hand-Feeding Formula, as it contains everything that they need to sustain them while they hopefully shed the PDD or ABV virus...So you'd need to feed both of them multiple times a day with an oral syringe (if you had an Avian Vet they would "Tube-Feed" or "Crop-Feed" them with a special Crop-Needle, but you can't do that if you don't know how and don't have a Crop-Needle)...So you'll have to hand-feed the parents the formula multiple times a day just like you would the babies...Otherwise the aren't going to get enough nutrition and they are going to start losing weight quickly...


Thank you so so much for this guidance. I have the kaytee hand feed and all the necessary hand feeding tools. I'll do as you mentioned everything above.
I'll let the chicks hatch and take them out of the nest as they hatch.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to wajahat For This Useful Post:
EllenD (02-20-2019)
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2019, 11:38 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2019
Thanks: 3
Thanked 11 Times in 5 Posts
wajahat is on a distinguished road
Re: Help!!!

Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
If you have a zoo or something nearby, that vet might be able to help (or a bird sanctuary?)--They would likely need to visit your birds in a neutral location (not near their birds- in case this is contagious),but maybe you could explain what you are seeing and get their opinion over the phone and set up a meeting.
Are there any long-time bird keepers in the area who you could call to ask about viral testing /medical treatments etc?

Poultry-types (chickens, geese etc) can catch PDD too, so even a farm vet might have some experience with it...Again, we just can't be certain that this is PDD without testing. That having been said, a farm vet may have seen it enough to make an educated guess if they deal with birds...If it is something else, maybe they have seen it in their birds as well. Parrots are unique in many ways, but you have to work with the resources you have, so you might call around.

I wish there was something I could do to help!


If you are unable to determine whether or not this is PDD, then I would treat them as though they have it until you know (even if you can't be sure, it isn't something you want to gamble with). Consequently, in addition to following Ellen's advice etc, I would quarantine the Alexandrines and hand-wash thoroughly between any/all of your birds (even the ones who appear to be healthy). A "carrier" can live a full life in many cases but once a bird is infected (whether or not they show symptoms) they can spread the virus to others throughout their lives. I would take extra care between handling/ feeding etc. Again, I am not a vet, but since there is a chance that this is viral, it is best to err on the side of caution.



I really hope you are able to find someone who can help.


Can dogs be the carrier of PDD? Because from where I got this pair, that guy used to import dogs from different countries and he kept dogs and parrots in the same hall kind of room.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 02-20-2019, 04:30 AM
Senior Member
Parrots:
Umbrella Cockatoo- 11 years old
Join Date: Jul 2018
Thanks: 3,415
Thanked 5,814 Times in 2,342 Posts
noodles123 will become famous soon enough
Re: Help!!!

Quote: Originally Posted by wajahat View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
If you have a zoo or something nearby, that vet might be able to help (or a bird sanctuary?)--They would likely need to visit your birds in a neutral location (not near their birds- in case this is contagious),but maybe you could explain what you are seeing and get their opinion over the phone and set up a meeting.
Are there any long-time bird keepers in the area who you could call to ask about viral testing /medical treatments etc?

Poultry-types (chickens, geese etc) can catch PDD too, so even a farm vet might have some experience with it...Again, we just can't be certain that this is PDD without testing. That having been said, a farm vet may have seen it enough to make an educated guess if they deal with birds...If it is something else, maybe they have seen it in their birds as well. Parrots are unique in many ways, but you have to work with the resources you have, so you might call around.

I wish there was something I could do to help!


If you are unable to determine whether or not this is PDD, then I would treat them as though they have it until you know (even if you can't be sure, it isn't something you want to gamble with). Consequently, in addition to following Ellen's advice etc, I would quarantine the Alexandrines and hand-wash thoroughly between any/all of your birds (even the ones who appear to be healthy). A "carrier" can live a full life in many cases but once a bird is infected (whether or not they show symptoms) they can spread the virus to others throughout their lives. I would take extra care between handling/ feeding etc. Again, I am not a vet, but since there is a chance that this is viral, it is best to err on the side of caution.

I really hope you are able to find someone who can help.
Can dogs be the carrier of PDD? Because from where I got this pair, that guy used to import dogs from different countries and he kept dogs and parrots in the same hall kind of room.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If this is truly PDD (and not something bacterial) or a different virus, then it is unlikely that your Alexandrines would have gotten it from a cat or dog (unless that cat or dog rolled on a dead bird or infected matter and then came inside, and was touched by the human, who then touched a bird or the bird's food). Cats, dogs and humans do not become infected with PDD/ABV and, to my knowledge, they cannot carry it internally.

That having been said, humans and other domesticated animals can aid in the spread of certain avian viruses by transporting infected feather dust/fecal germs etc on their hair/fur/clothes/hands/shoes etc...but, in most cases (and definitely in the case of PDD/ABV) it still would have had to come from another bird originally. Some wild birds and poultry can carry certain viruses (including PDD), so let's say someone worked at a factory and plucked chickens, they could bring a number of viruses home in their hair/clothes...Or, lets say a bird ate an apple from a tree and that apple had been pooped on by an infected bird...

Nevertheless, based on what you have said, is much more likely that one or more of the man's birds were infected and/or carrying disease (if viral). It is also equally possible that the Alexandrines acquired a virus from one of the birds already living at your house (a carrier without symptoms).

Bird viruses make my head spin because they don't follow the same rules as human illness. They are a confusing matter for the veterinary community as well (especially ABV and PDD). Researchers aren't sure why some birds can spread them without getting sick and they don't know why the incubation periods vary so significantly bird to bird (even within the same species). To add to the confusion, there are multiple strains and immunity to one doesn't mean "immunity" to all or even immunity to that same strain if exposed repeatedly. Then there is the issue of "false negatives" when testing...

Without initial testing of all new birds (from day 1), it is a giant guessing game because symptoms are invisible half of the time. That is why boarding a bird, buying a bird from a pet shop, or even attending bird shows can be quite risky...even though most of us have done at least one of these things. After all, birds have to come from somewhere.

Anytime you have parrots together, unless you test them all, a single carrier (without symptoms) could spread a virus to the rest of them and, although some of those birds might become ill within weeks, many would just become carriers themselves (continuing to spread the virus to others) and others would not show symptoms until months/ upwards of 10 years later (often when stressed). Even if the guy you bought from tested all of his birds for PDD and other viruses (which is unlikely) with an incubation period of up to 10 years, an infected carrier can produce a false negative test result because they don't always shed enough of it to be detected by analysis.

Last edited by noodles123; 02-20-2019 at 05:44 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Community > Breeding/Raising Parrots

Tags
alexander parakeet, help needed

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.