Parrot Forum Header Left  
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Species Specific > Budgies/Parakeets

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-11-2019, 09:23 AM
Junior Member
Parrots:
Budgies : Neon - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018 Tina - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Indore , M P , India
Thanks: 20
Thanked 25 Times in 14 Posts
devilhunaid is on a distinguished road
Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

My budgie is with me almost more than 6 month. They have completed their molting. My male cere has turned to bright blue but my female is not turning brown why??.?
They are spending their most of the time at nest box. Most of the time female is inside the the nest and male outside kissing and talking with her.

Last edited by devilhunaid; 06-11-2019 at 09:33 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 06-11-2019, 10:58 AM
itzjbean's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Boo - whiteface cockatiel DOB 2011. Ember - pastelface pearl cockatiel, DOB March 30, 2018. Rue - pearl cockatiel DOB 2012.
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Iowa, USA
Thanks: 2,786
Thanked 3,421 Times in 1,531 Posts
itzjbean is on a distinguished road
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

How old are these budgies? Are you saying they are 6 months old or just have been with you this long? Budgies should never breed under a year old.

There could be multiple reasons why cere in not turning brown on her. Could be her color mutation (some females it does not turn brown).

Could also be their diet. What are you feeding them?

Could be their age. No budgies/ parakeets should be allowed to breed if they are under a year. It's very hard on their bodies to breed and especially the female to lay eggs and put tons of nutrients into the eggs themselves. If her diet is not right she will not lay eggs.

Breeding should not be attempted if you have never done so before, it could be catastrophic to possible babies born that need your help surviving if the parents abandon them. I would remove the nest box seeing as the female is not in condition anyway.
__________________
- Jackie, Boo , Rue & Ember

See more of my flock on Instagram!
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2019, 12:48 AM
Junior Member
Parrots:
Budgies : Neon - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018 Tina - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Indore , M P , India
Thanks: 20
Thanked 25 Times in 14 Posts
devilhunaid is on a distinguished road
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

They are with me more than 6 month. Their diet is mixed seed & vegetables. I dont know their real age but they completed their first molt.
Thanks I will wait for their to become 1 year old
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2019, 07:50 AM
EllenD's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Senegal Parrot named "Kane"; Yellow-Sided Green Cheek Conure named "Bowie"; Blue Quaker Parrot named "Lita Ford"; Cockatiel named "Duff"; 8 American/English Budgie Hybrids; Ringneck Dove named "Dylan"
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: State College, PA
Thanks: 6,433
Thanked 7,497 Times in 3,064 Posts
EllenD will become famous soon enough
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

An adult female Budgie's Cere can be either white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings around each nostril. So it won't necessarily be brown in color. The only time that all female Budgie's Ceres turn a brown color is when they are in "breeding-season", and then they turn a very, very dark chocolate brown color and become very thick and crusty in texture, almost scabby. Then after breeding season they turn back to whatever color they were prior...

An adult male Budgie's Cere can be either blue, pink (it just stays pink if it was pink as a baby/juvenile), or purple.

***Not all Budgie's Ceres turn colors at the same time from their baby/juvenile pink, white, or gray; they first must go through puberty, which happens for Budgies between the ages (usually) of 8 months old and 1 year old, give or take a few months. If they are put in with an adult Budgie this can influence them to go through puberty early, as will any types of Huts, Tents, Boxes, Hammocks, Beds, basically anything that creates a small, dark place they can get inside of or underneath, as well as any "substrates" in the bottom of their cages that can be considered "nesting material". I've seen Budgies as young as 5 months old go into puberty because their owners put a Happy Hut/Bed or some kind of substrate like wood chips or rodent bedding in the bottom of their cages, or because they put their baby Budgie in the same cage with an adult...But in-general, they shouldn't hit puberty until they are close to a year old.

If you've had your Budgies for over 6 months then they should be close to sexual-maturity, but just because one of them went through puberty and it's Cere changed to a bright blue color (indicating it's a male ONLY IF IT HAS NO WHITE RINGS AROUND EACH NOSTRIL, IF THIS HAPPENS IT'S A GIRL), that doesn't mean that the other Budgie will go through puberty at the same time. However, once again, an adult/sexually-mature female Budgie's Cere doesn't have to be brown in color, it can be white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings/shading around each nostril.

How do you know you have a female in the first place? If this Budgie you're talking about had a pink colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it simply stayed pink in color, and the Budgie is sure to be over a year old, then that probably just means that it's a male Budgie...However, if this Budgie had a white/cream/tan colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it stayed that color after it reached 1 year-old, then that means it's a female.[/B]

If you post a photo of your Budgies we can tell you their sex (as long as they have gone through puberty), and give you a pretty good idea of their ages.
__________________
"Dance Like Nobody's Watching".

Last edited by EllenD; 06-12-2019 at 07:53 AM.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to EllenD For This Useful Post:
devilhunaid (06-13-2019), itzjbean (06-12-2019)
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2019, 11:32 AM
Junior Member
Parrots:
Budgies : Neon - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018 Tina - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Indore , M P , India
Thanks: 20
Thanked 25 Times in 14 Posts
devilhunaid is on a distinguished road
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

Quote: Originally Posted by EllenD View Post
An adult female Budgie's Cere can be either white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings around each nostril. So it won't necessarily be brown in color. The only time that all female Budgie's Ceres turn a brown color is when they are in "breeding-season", and then they turn a very, very dark chocolate brown color and become very thick and crusty in texture, almost scabby. Then after breeding season they turn back to whatever color they were prior...

An adult male Budgie's Cere can be either blue, pink (it just stays pink if it was pink as a baby/juvenile), or purple.

***Not all Budgie's Ceres turn colors at the same time from their baby/juvenile pink, white, or gray; they first must go through puberty, which happens for Budgies between the ages (usually) of 8 months old and 1 year old, give or take a few months. If they are put in with an adult Budgie this can influence them to go through puberty early, as will any types of Huts, Tents, Boxes, Hammocks, Beds, basically anything that creates a small, dark place they can get inside of or underneath, as well as any "substrates" in the bottom of their cages that can be considered "nesting material". I've seen Budgies as young as 5 months old go into puberty because their owners put a Happy Hut/Bed or some kind of substrate like wood chips or rodent bedding in the bottom of their cages, or because they put their baby Budgie in the same cage with an adult...But in-general, they shouldn't hit puberty until they are close to a year old.

If you've had your Budgies for over 6 months then they should be close to sexual-maturity, but just because one of them went through puberty and it's Cere changed to a bright blue color (indicating it's a male ONLY IF IT HAS NO WHITE RINGS AROUND EACH NOSTRIL, IF THIS HAPPENS IT'S A GIRL), that doesn't mean that the other Budgie will go through puberty at the same time. However, once again, an adult/sexually-mature female Budgie's Cere doesn't have to be brown in color, it can be white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings/shading around each nostril.

How do you know you have a female in the first place? If this Budgie you're talking about had a pink colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it simply stayed pink in color, and the Budgie is sure to be over a year old, then that probably just means that it's a male Budgie...However, if this Budgie had a white/cream/tan colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it stayed that color after it reached 1 year-old, then that means it's a female.[/B]

If you post a photo of your Budgies we can tell you their sex (as long as they have gone through puberty), and give you a pretty good idea of their ages.
Hello Know I have a new problem.


Is she egg bound?

Last edited by devilhunaid; 06-14-2019 at 01:14 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2019, 12:31 PM
itzjbean's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Boo - whiteface cockatiel DOB 2011. Ember - pastelface pearl cockatiel, DOB March 30, 2018. Rue - pearl cockatiel DOB 2012.
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Iowa, USA
Thanks: 2,786
Thanked 3,421 Times in 1,531 Posts
itzjbean is on a distinguished road
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

Quote: Originally Posted by devilhunaid View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by EllenD View Post
An adult female Budgie's Cere can be either white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings around each nostril. So it won't necessarily be brown in color. The only time that all female Budgie's Ceres turn a brown color is when they are in "breeding-season", and then they turn a very, very dark chocolate brown color and become very thick and crusty in texture, almost scabby. Then after breeding season they turn back to whatever color they were prior...

An adult male Budgie's Cere can be either blue, pink (it just stays pink if it was pink as a baby/juvenile), or purple.

***Not all Budgie's Ceres turn colors at the same time from their baby/juvenile pink, white, or gray; they first must go through puberty, which happens for Budgies between the ages (usually) of 8 months old and 1 year old, give or take a few months. If they are put in with an adult Budgie this can influence them to go through puberty early, as will any types of Huts, Tents, Boxes, Hammocks, Beds, basically anything that creates a small, dark place they can get inside of or underneath, as well as any "substrates" in the bottom of their cages that can be considered "nesting material". I've seen Budgies as young as 5 months old go into puberty because their owners put a Happy Hut/Bed or some kind of substrate like wood chips or rodent bedding in the bottom of their cages, or because they put their baby Budgie in the same cage with an adult...But in-general, they shouldn't hit puberty until they are close to a year old.

If you've had your Budgies for over 6 months then they should be close to sexual-maturity, but just because one of them went through puberty and it's Cere changed to a bright blue color (indicating it's a male ONLY IF IT HAS NO WHITE RINGS AROUND EACH NOSTRIL, IF THIS HAPPENS IT'S A GIRL), that doesn't mean that the other Budgie will go through puberty at the same time. However, once again, an adult/sexually-mature female Budgie's Cere doesn't have to be brown in color, it can be white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings/shading around each nostril.

How do you know you have a female in the first place? If this Budgie you're talking about had a pink colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it simply stayed pink in color, and the Budgie is sure to be over a year old, then that probably just means that it's a male Budgie...However, if this Budgie had a white/cream/tan colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it stayed that color after it reached 1 year-old, then that means it's a female.[/B]

If you post a photo of your Budgies we can tell you their sex (as long as they have gone through puberty), and give you a pretty good idea of their ages.
Hello Know I have a new problem.


Is she egg bound?

It's hard to tell from a sentence on the internet if your bird is egg bound. If you think yourhen is egg bound it would be in her best interest to get to a vet. Hopefully in your area in India you can find someone nearby to check on her?
__________________
- Jackie, Boo , Rue & Ember

See more of my flock on Instagram!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to itzjbean For This Useful Post:
EllenD (Yesterday)
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-14-2019, 01:12 AM
Junior Member
Parrots:
Budgies : Neon - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018 Tina - Birthday :: Unknown , Brought home :: 16 December 2018
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Indore , M P , India
Thanks: 20
Thanked 25 Times in 14 Posts
devilhunaid is on a distinguished road
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

Quote: Originally Posted by itzjbean View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by devilhunaid View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by EllenD View Post
An adult female Budgie's Cere can be either white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings around each nostril. So it won't necessarily be brown in color. The only time that all female Budgie's Ceres turn a brown color is when they are in "breeding-season", and then they turn a very, very dark chocolate brown color and become very thick and crusty in texture, almost scabby. Then after breeding season they turn back to whatever color they were prior...

An adult male Budgie's Cere can be either blue, pink (it just stays pink if it was pink as a baby/juvenile), or purple.

***Not all Budgie's Ceres turn colors at the same time from their baby/juvenile pink, white, or gray; they first must go through puberty, which happens for Budgies between the ages (usually) of 8 months old and 1 year old, give or take a few months. If they are put in with an adult Budgie this can influence them to go through puberty early, as will any types of Huts, Tents, Boxes, Hammocks, Beds, basically anything that creates a small, dark place they can get inside of or underneath, as well as any "substrates" in the bottom of their cages that can be considered "nesting material". I've seen Budgies as young as 5 months old go into puberty because their owners put a Happy Hut/Bed or some kind of substrate like wood chips or rodent bedding in the bottom of their cages, or because they put their baby Budgie in the same cage with an adult...But in-general, they shouldn't hit puberty until they are close to a year old.

If you've had your Budgies for over 6 months then they should be close to sexual-maturity, but just because one of them went through puberty and it's Cere changed to a bright blue color (indicating it's a male ONLY IF IT HAS NO WHITE RINGS AROUND EACH NOSTRIL, IF THIS HAPPENS IT'S A GIRL), that doesn't mean that the other Budgie will go through puberty at the same time. However, once again, an adult/sexually-mature female Budgie's Cere doesn't have to be brown in color, it can be white, cream, tan, brown, or bright blue with white rings/shading around each nostril.

How do you know you have a female in the first place? If this Budgie you're talking about had a pink colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it simply stayed pink in color, and the Budgie is sure to be over a year old, then that probably just means that it's a male Budgie...However, if this Budgie had a white/cream/tan colored Cere as a baby/juvenile and it stayed that color after it reached 1 year-old, then that means it's a female.[/B]

If you post a photo of your Budgies we can tell you their sex (as long as they have gone through puberty), and give you a pretty good idea of their ages.
Hello Know I have a new problem.


Is she egg bound?

It's hard to tell from a sentence on the internet if your bird is egg bound. If you think yourhen is egg bound it would be in her best interest to get to a vet. Hopefully in your area in India you can find someone nearby to check on her?
I added a picture in that reply but it is not showing.
http://drive.google.com/file/d/1-y41...w?usp=drivesdk

Last edited by devilhunaid; 06-14-2019 at 01:15 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old Yesterday, 10:20 AM
EllenD's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Senegal Parrot named "Kane"; Yellow-Sided Green Cheek Conure named "Bowie"; Blue Quaker Parrot named "Lita Ford"; Cockatiel named "Duff"; 8 American/English Budgie Hybrids; Ringneck Dove named "Dylan"
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: State College, PA
Thanks: 6,433
Thanked 7,497 Times in 3,064 Posts
EllenD will become famous soon enough
Re: Why my Female budgie cere is not turning brown?

To add a photo all you have to do is write a reply in the message box, and then put the cursor where you want the photo to appear. Then click on the button in the taskbar above that is the "upload photo" button and that looks like a little yellow square with a landscape in it...Then you'll go to a page that allows you to choose the photo you want to add (click "Browse" to find the photo file on your device), then hit "upload" and it will automatically upload the photo and put it where the cursor was in the message box. Then hit the button at the bottom of that page that says something like "Close this page"...It will then take you back to this page, and you just hit the "post reply" button like you normally do...

***Why do you think your Budgie might be Egg-Bound? Just to be clear, your Budgie's Cere not changing color would have NOTHING AT ALL to do with her being Egg-Bound (assuming your Budgie is actually a female, which we will be able to tell you once we see a photo of her; make sure the photo is one of her face/head that clearly shows her Cere and Nostrils as well as her Forehead)....So if you are thinking that your Budgie might be Egg-Bound because her Cere hasn't changed colors, then that's just not true. I don't know why you're thinking she might be Egg-Bound, just wanted to make sure you weren't thinking that a Budgie's Cere color or lack of it changing after puberty has anything to do with a reproductive problem or Egg-Binding, because they are not related in ANY WAY AT ALL...

If your Budgie is a female, which she may very well NOT BE, she could be Egg-Bound, that's always a risk, but it's highly unlikely if you've had her for only 6-months and you got her when she was a young baby...As long as you are feeding her a healthy Seed-Mix that is commercially sold and is specifically for Budgies (as opposed to you feeding her nothing but Sunflower Seeds, or any other single type of Seed, or something else that is totally inappropriate for Budgies to eat), she should be getting a good amount of Calcium, Phosphorous, and all other Vitamins and Minerals that she needs. And though this alone won't stop Egg-Binding from happening, nor will diet alone cause Egg-Binding, at her very young age it's just much more rare...But not totally uncommon either...

****If your Budgie was actually Egg-Bound, she would be constantly in a "straining to poop" type of position constantly, like she is trying to push the Egg out and can't do it; she would most-likely be laying on the grate at the bottom of the cage because they are usually in too much pain to perch, don't have enough strength to perch, and because they are trying to lay an Egg they are typically in the place that they usually go to lay their Eggs, which for a bird as young as your Budgie, whom you don't really even know if she's a female in the first place, nor are you breeding her, would be just right on the grate at the bottom of the cage (DO NOT PUT A NEST-BOX OR ANY OTHER TYPE OF BOX OR "NEST" IN HER CAGE!!! THIS IS NOT MEANT FOR BIRDS LAYING INFERTILE EGGS, AND HAVING ANY TYPE OF NEST, BOX, HUT, TENT, BED, ETC. AS WELL AS ANY TYPE OF "SUBSTRATE" INSIDE OF THEIR CAGE OR IN THE BOTTOM OF THE CAGE EITHER ON TOP OR UNDERNEATH THE GRATE WILL ONLY TRIGGER THEIR SEX-HORMONES AND ACTUALLY CAUSE THEM TO BECOME HORMONAL AND FORM FOLLICLES AND EGGS! So if your Budgie is acting normally, is perching normally, walking around normally, eating and drinking normally, isn't constantly trying to "strain" to push an Egg out (like she always has to poop but can't), then she's not Egg-Bound. [B]It's very difficult to NOT NOTICE a bird who is Egg-Bound, because it causes such horrible pain and distress to the female Bird that you can't help but immediately notice something is very wrong with them; Egg-Binding is really the ONLY medical-condition/illness that Birds can't hide the outward signs/symptoms of at all for any amount of time. Because of the pain constant distress they immediately experience after carrying a fully-produced Egg around in their bellies for too long and not being able to pass it, they just become outwardly sick almost immediately, and at times they'll even suffer temporary-paralysis in the lower-half of their bodies because of the Egg pressing against their Sciatic Nerve for too long a period of time...Birds who are Egg-Bound, all species of birds, parrots, poultry birds, etc., will only survive that way for a few days to a week or so at most before they die, either of a horrible abdominal infection that causes Sepsis throughout their bodies called Peritonitis, or they die from any other number of horribly painful reasons, such as their blood-flow being cut-off by the pressure of the Egg on large vessels in the abdomen, from the pressure of the Egg pushing internal organs up out of the abdominal cavity and up into their chest, from the Eggs rupturing and spilling yolk into their abdominal cavities causing again Peritonitis, from them prolapsing their internal organs while trying to push the Egg out and causing great internal bleeding or infection and death of the organs if they aren't immediately put back into the body, and then just from severe Dehydration and/or Starvation because they are in so much pain while Egg-Bound that they refuse to eat or drink....For this reason, if you read this and you are certain that this is what is wrong with your Budgie, then you must get her to an Avian Vet or Emergency Animal Hospital at once, because at this point she doesn't have much time left...However, you haven't mentioned any symptoms/signs that make you think she's Egg-Bound, so I don't know if you are thinking she's sick/in-pain because she's acting oddly and showing symptoms of being sick/in-pain, or if this is what you are thinking simply because of her Cere color, which has nothing to do with any health issues at all...

***I had asked you to describe what color her Cere was when you first brought her home 6-months ago, and then to tell me what color her Cere is now, as this will tell us a lot about her gender and her age. I also asked why you think that she's a female in the first-place, [B]because NO ONE, NOT EVEN A BUDGIE'S BREEDER OR SELLER, CAN VISUALLY TELL WHAT GENDER THEY ARE UNTIL THEY GO THROUGH PUBERTY AND BECOME SEXUALLY-MATURE AND THEIR CERE CHANGES COLOR OR DOESN'T CHANGE COLOR, AND THIS DOESN'T HAPPEN TYPICALLY UNTIL THEY ARE AROUND 1 YEAR-OLD...So my point is that if the person or people you got your Budgies from told you that one was a male and one was a female (or you told them you wanted/you asked for one male Budgie and one female Budgie), and they were both still baby or juvenile Budgies, which they most-likely were from what you described (since one of your Budgies went through puberty clearly after you had had him for a number of months, indicated by the change of the color of his Cere to a solid, bright blue color, meaning that he was a very young, baby Budgie when you first got him), then there is NO WAY that anyone could have known the sex of either of the Budgies you brought home at their age when you first got them, UNLESS THEY PAID FOR A DNA-TEST TO BE DONE ON BOTH OF THEM THROUGH EITHER BLOOD OR FRESHLY-PLUCKED FEATHERS, AND YOU GOT A DNA-CERTIFICATE FOR EACH OF THEM STATING THE GENDER OF EACH OF THEM ON THE CERTIFICATE...These DNA-Tests cost money and have to be sent-out to a lab that does the testing, and that's after they have an Avian Vet draw blood, or the breeder plucks feathers from their chest...And unless you paid them extra for 2 separate DNA-Tests and you got 2 DNA-Certificates stating each of their Genders, then there is NO WAY AT ALL that your Budgie's breeder, or the pet/bird shop you bought them from, etc. could visually sex them or be able to definitely give you one male and one female Budgie, tell you what each of the genders was visually. It's impossible.

So if you were told by whomever you got them from as young babies that they could tell what gender they each were just by looking at them, or by some other inaccurate "myth" of a gender-test that breeders often lie about to try to make buyers who want a specific gender of baby bird happy, such as "feeling their Pelvic-Bones and how wide the space between their Iliac-Crests is, and if the space is very narrow it's a male, if the space is very wide it's a female" (that's an old breeder's scam that some really shady Parrot Breeders and Brokers still try to tell buyers today when they insist on buying a specific gender without paying for a proper DNA-Test), they were lying to you and it was just not true (or they actually believe that some of these shady and made-up ways of telling a baby/juvenile bird's gender are actually true because they were taught it by another shady Breeder or Broker, lol)...So apparently one of your Budgies has already gone through puberty since you brought him home because you saw the change in-color of the Cere, and if it's a SOLID BLUE color, meaning that the entire Cere is solid-blue and there are no white-rings or light-shading around the Nostrils, then it's a male Budgie....However, if this other Budgie has not yet gone through puberty and is not yet sexually-mature, then it's very likely that it may not be a female at all, but rather a male. Unless you paid for a DNA-test and were given a DNA-Certificate stating as much, then this second Budgie may be a female or it may be a male...And that's why I asked if this Budgie's Cere color was originally Pink when you first brought it home, because adult, sexually-mature male Budgies can have either a Solid-Blue Cere, a Solid-Purple Cere, OR a Solid-Pink Cere...And when a Budgie is born with and has a Pink-colored Cere when they are babies/juveniles, and then they go through puberty and become sexually-mature, if they are males their Cere typically DOES NOT CHANGE COLOR AT ALL, IT JUST STAYS THE SAME PINK COLOR, INDICATING THAT IT'S A MALE BUDGIE.
__________________
"Dance Like Nobody's Watching".
Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Species Specific > Budgies/Parakeets

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Something on my budgie’s cere Jadaluv14 Budgies/Parakeets 4 02-15-2019 07:05 PM
Opinions on Pearl’s cere: it’s been dark brown for quite a long time reeb Budgies/Parakeets 15 09-19-2018 10:23 AM
Budgie cere turning blue! T13 Budgies/Parakeets 6 09-06-2017 02:36 AM
Brown spot on male (?) budgie cere Mm6393 Budgies/Parakeets 2 07-22-2017 12:39 PM
Budgie random brown spot on cere Mm6393 Budgies/Parakeets 4 06-27-2017 06:43 AM



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.