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Old 02-07-2015, 01:26 PM
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Re: Male conure 'heat'

Super dude, please change. Your method. Touching under wings can be a sexual touch for birds, ESPECIALLY when they are already ramped up to the point of humping, touching under his wings at this time is likely making your problem worse even if you don't see the results yet. Why not try something like distracting him puting him in a perch and having him do a couple of tricks and get a treat for the tricks? Much less sexual. Right now you are likely teaching him to hump you in order to get sexual touch. One thing this could cause is it could reinforce underwing touches as an instant sexual trigger which could mean in the future that you are unable to touch him there at all, which I am sure you don't want.
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Old 03-11-2020, 01:16 PM
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Re: Male conure 'heat'

My male is nesting. He lost his female a year ago and they raised three babies together. I got him a new bird and they bonded. But now heís hiding all the time and the new bird just turned a year. It sounds like I should just let him be , let nature take it course. I donít know if my new bird is make or female but it doesnít matter right now because it sounds like it is too young to be sexually active. I feel bad for the new bird, like heís all whatís up. But as long as they are healthy and happy so am I. Thank You
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Old 03-25-2020, 06:05 PM
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Re: Male conure 'heat'

Quote: Originally Posted by SilverSage View Post
This will be a long post because I am basically copying a section of an article I wrote recently. Please read all the way to the part where I discuss getting your bird a mate. Since it is not addressed in the article but you mention it, I will address right now the issue of clipping. I am pro-flight for many reasons such as health, safety, and the freedom to interact with the family on a voluntary level. However, if the fact that the bird is able to fly makes the home unsafe for the humans and leads to him being locked away then the ability to fly TAKES AWAY from his health, safety, and human interaction rather than adding to it. follow the suggestions below, but if you are still not able to allow your bird to be out of his cage safely and often then not clipping achieves the EXACT OPPOSITE of what most people want to accomplish by leaving the bird flighted.



WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR BIRD WANTS TO HAVE YOUR BABIES
-Recognize your birdís natural breeding season and be prepared to take extra measures.

-Limit daylight hours. Be sure the bird has 100% DARK AND QUIET for at 12- 14 hours per day. You may need a second cage for sleeping to make this possible. Long days means spring means BABIES!
-Make sure the cage is in a bright place (no dim/nesty corners) Dim areas can stimulate breeding and nesting behaviors.
-Rearrange his cage and even the room he is in, or move him to a different room. Safe and steady environments are signal to him that this room is great for raising a family. You want him to feel safe, just not feel like everything is steady and safe enough for him to think ďHm, looks like a great neighborhood to raise a familyÖĒ
-Limit fatty foods. If you are feeding an all seed or seed/pellet mix, it is time to change that. Research sprouting for your bird, it is easy and cheap, super healthy, and an easy switch from seeds. Diets high in fat are great for raising babies and your bird knows it! Begin incorporating as many safe veggies as possible and a few safe fruits. See the article on transitioning your bird to a healthier diet. An added bonus is that the new and more interesting food may take some of his attention from the idea of nesting.
-No mushy or warm foods because that is what parrots feed their mates when they are getting ready for and raising chicks. That regurgitated goo he left on your shoulder? Warm and mushy food for his mate Ė you.
-ABSOLUTELY NO snuggle huts, tents, nest boxes, and no letting the bird get into tight places like shoes, etc, because those are all great places to raise babies! Also, despite what the sales person at the pet shop might have told you, no parrot needs these things to be happy. In fact, they are some of the most dangerous items commonly found in bird cages as they are often made out of fabric and the chewed strands are perfect for entangling toes and injuring or killing birds. Also, nesting parents have been known to eat rope and cloth toys and feed the fibers to their babies Ė not healthy.
-DO NOT allow your bird to snuggle under your hand AT ALL. Allow him ONLY to step up and get head/neck scritches. No shoulders as those can be snuggled against your will. Do NOT put your hand over the bird's back unless there is a true emergency. Every time you touch him, or even almost touch him on his back it can be sexually exciting for the bird.
-EVERY time your bird backs his (more likely her) butt up to you, tail in the air, tries to mount your hand, or does any other "nesty" things, immediately put the bird back in the cage. You need to send the signal that you are not interested in raising a family with him. Once the bird has calmed down, get him back out and distract him with a non-cuddling activity.
-Increase hands-off training. Just because your petting time with your bird decreases does not mean the amount of time out of the cage should be cut. Put all that birdy energy to use and spend some time teach your bird new behaviors and tricks which do not involve excess physical touch. Things like teaching the bird to wave, come when called, return to his or her cage on command, turn in a circle, etc are all fairly simply behaviors that can be taught and need not involve snuggles if the proper food treat is located. Learning new things helps keep your birdís mind busy and gives you a non-sexual way to spend time together even at the height of hormone season.
-Limit food. Be sure your bird has enough to eat, but don't allow grazing. Feeding two "meals" a day and then removing the food is best here, because where there is an abundance of food, birds have enough food to feed babies. If you are going to do this, I highly suggest incorporating foraging toys into the birdís life if you havenít already. A foraging toy is anything that makes the bird work for his food, usually something that has been put inside the toy. Foraging is simply looking for food, and it is a natural behavior for birds, but is learned. If your bird has never foraged before start with something simple like switching the food and water dishes, then moving the dishes to new locations inside the cage, maybe even outside the cage! Work upward in difficulty but be sure your bird is getting enough to eat as he learns to work for his food.
-Make sure others in the home are handling the bird. It is tempting when a bird is misbehaving to simply put him in his cage and leave him there, or to have only the person who is least likely to get bitten handle the bird. However, neglecting the bird is cruel and irresponsible, and having only the favorite person handle the bird serves only to increase the mate bond the bird feels with them, thus encouraging hormonal behavior. Insist that the bird interact with other members of the family. This does not have to mean that other people put their fingers in harmís way; interaction can be as simple as a third grader reading to the bird, a teenager doing homework while the bird is on a playstand nearby, or a spouse assisting in a training session by being the one to offer treats. Any positive interaction people other than the perceived mate can have with the bird is a step in the right direction.
Does this only apply to the breeding season? (New mama to be here)
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old Today, 03:55 AM
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Parrots:
Eclectus, CAG, BH Pionus, Maximilianís Pionus, Quakers, Indian Ringnecks, Green Cheeked Conures, Black Capped Conures, Cockatiels, Lovebirds, Budgies, Canaries, Diamond Doves, Zebra Finches, Society F
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Columbus, GA
Thanks: 2,877
Thanked 8,969 Times in 3,612 Posts
SilverSage will become famous soon enough
Re: Male conure 'heat'

Quote: Originally Posted by lollipoppy View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by SilverSage View Post
This will be a long post because I am basically copying a section of an article I wrote recently. Please read all the way to the part where I discuss getting your bird a mate. Since it is not addressed in the article but you mention it, I will address right now the issue of clipping. I am pro-flight for many reasons such as health, safety, and the freedom to interact with the family on a voluntary level. However, if the fact that the bird is able to fly makes the home unsafe for the humans and leads to him being locked away then the ability to fly TAKES AWAY from his health, safety, and human interaction rather than adding to it. follow the suggestions below, but if you are still not able to allow your bird to be out of his cage safely and often then not clipping achieves the EXACT OPPOSITE of what most people want to accomplish by leaving the bird flighted.



WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR BIRD WANTS TO HAVE YOUR BABIES
-Recognize your birdís natural breeding season and be prepared to take extra measures.

-Limit daylight hours. Be sure the bird has 100% DARK AND QUIET for at 12- 14 hours per day. You may need a second cage for sleeping to make this possible. Long days means spring means BABIES!
-Make sure the cage is in a bright place (no dim/nesty corners) Dim areas can stimulate breeding and nesting behaviors.
-Rearrange his cage and even the room he is in, or move him to a different room. Safe and steady environments are signal to him that this room is great for raising a family. You want him to feel safe, just not feel like everything is steady and safe enough for him to think ďHm, looks like a great neighborhood to raise a familyÖĒ
-Limit fatty foods. If you are feeding an all seed or seed/pellet mix, it is time to change that. Research sprouting for your bird, it is easy and cheap, super healthy, and an easy switch from seeds. Diets high in fat are great for raising babies and your bird knows it! Begin incorporating as many safe veggies as possible and a few safe fruits. See the article on transitioning your bird to a healthier diet. An added bonus is that the new and more interesting food may take some of his attention from the idea of nesting.
-No mushy or warm foods because that is what parrots feed their mates when they are getting ready for and raising chicks. That regurgitated goo he left on your shoulder? Warm and mushy food for his mate Ė you.
-ABSOLUTELY NO snuggle huts, tents, nest boxes, and no letting the bird get into tight places like shoes, etc, because those are all great places to raise babies! Also, despite what the sales person at the pet shop might have told you, no parrot needs these things to be happy. In fact, they are some of the most dangerous items commonly found in bird cages as they are often made out of fabric and the chewed strands are perfect for entangling toes and injuring or killing birds. Also, nesting parents have been known to eat rope and cloth toys and feed the fibers to their babies Ė not healthy.
-DO NOT allow your bird to snuggle under your hand AT ALL. Allow him ONLY to step up and get head/neck scritches. No shoulders as those can be snuggled against your will. Do NOT put your hand over the bird's back unless there is a true emergency. Every time you touch him, or even almost touch him on his back it can be sexually exciting for the bird.
-EVERY time your bird backs his (more likely her) butt up to you, tail in the air, tries to mount your hand, or does any other "nesty" things, immediately put the bird back in the cage. You need to send the signal that you are not interested in raising a family with him. Once the bird has calmed down, get him back out and distract him with a non-cuddling activity.
-Increase hands-off training. Just because your petting time with your bird decreases does not mean the amount of time out of the cage should be cut. Put all that birdy energy to use and spend some time teach your bird new behaviors and tricks which do not involve excess physical touch. Things like teaching the bird to wave, come when called, return to his or her cage on command, turn in a circle, etc are all fairly simply behaviors that can be taught and need not involve snuggles if the proper food treat is located. Learning new things helps keep your birdís mind busy and gives you a non-sexual way to spend time together even at the height of hormone season.
-Limit food. Be sure your bird has enough to eat, but don't allow grazing. Feeding two "meals" a day and then removing the food is best here, because where there is an abundance of food, birds have enough food to feed babies. If you are going to do this, I highly suggest incorporating foraging toys into the birdís life if you havenít already. A foraging toy is anything that makes the bird work for his food, usually something that has been put inside the toy. Foraging is simply looking for food, and it is a natural behavior for birds, but is learned. If your bird has never foraged before start with something simple like switching the food and water dishes, then moving the dishes to new locations inside the cage, maybe even outside the cage! Work upward in difficulty but be sure your bird is getting enough to eat as he learns to work for his food.
-Make sure others in the home are handling the bird. It is tempting when a bird is misbehaving to simply put him in his cage and leave him there, or to have only the person who is least likely to get bitten handle the bird. However, neglecting the bird is cruel and irresponsible, and having only the favorite person handle the bird serves only to increase the mate bond the bird feels with them, thus encouraging hormonal behavior. Insist that the bird interact with other members of the family. This does not have to mean that other people put their fingers in harmís way; interaction can be as simple as a third grader reading to the bird, a teenager doing homework while the bird is on a playstand nearby, or a spouse assisting in a training session by being the one to offer treats. Any positive interaction people other than the perceived mate can have with the bird is a step in the right direction.
Does this only apply to the breeding season? (New mama to be here)

Most of these things are good practice at all times not just during breeding season


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