Parrot Forum Header Left  
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Species Specific > Eclectus

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 10-13-2019, 02:49 PM
Junior Member
Parrots:
Currently looking for one
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Illinois
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 6 Posts
4toes_1beak is on a distinguished road
Re: Eclectus: preparation guidance for first time owner

Quote: Originally Posted by shinyuankuo View Post

I will for sure have problem when I get a bird. It's never gonna go as well as we plan.
That is true. But researching all that we can will help make solving the problem so much easier.

So far from what I've read on here, eclectus fb community, books... if an ekkie is screaming and they're past their terrible teens hormonal stage,
It's because something is upsetting them and it could be medical. (I view 'dietary' as medical). Other reasons are feelings of neglect... etc... the normal stuff that would make a bird upset.
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2019, 09:29 AM
Anansi's Avatar
Super Moderator
Parrots:
Maya (Female Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Jolly (Male Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Bixby (Male, red-sided eclectus. RIP), Suzie (Male cockatiel. RIP)
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Somerset,NJ
Thanks: 77,768
Thanked 51,520 Times in 16,286 Posts
Anansi will become famous soon enoughAnansi will become famous soon enough
Re: Eclectus: preparation guidance for first time owner

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak View Post
1st: What is the best way to acclimate a new eclectus to a home with 2 kids (my kids will be 7 and 8 years of age if I bring home the bird in two years) a live-in man (he sleeps in the bed with me, helps cook dinner, helps take care of the kids and dogs, loves animals as much as I do, helps clean the house and does his own laundry), and 2 large dogs. (The dogs will be almost 9 and almost 10 in 2 years so there is a chance that they might not be around in 2 years).
The biggest issue here would be the dogs. My advice here, and I can't stress this enough, is to never forget that dogs are predators. Never trust them with your birds. Ever. No matter how sweet, cuddly and peaceful they may typically be with other animals. There have been so many stories of birds and dogs (or even more so with cats) who seemed to be best buddies, only for things to go horrendously wrong one day seemingly out of the blue.

As for kids, I'd just suggest that you curb their roughhousing type play whenever they're near the birds. I have two young, very energetic, boys. They are now 11 and 8, but they were only 5 and 2 when I brought my first ekkie home. The main thing here was teaching my boys not to do all kinds of crazy play in the family room, as that's where I keep my ekkies. This makes a difference, because that kind of craziness can really stress them out. (Same for screaming in anger. They are sensitive to emotion.)

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
2nd: Do eclectus show any warning signs before they bite or are they like cockatoos where there is no visual warning sign you just feel this heightened energy all of the sudden? How do I train them not to bite? (wiki-how had a special thing on eclectus no-bite training but I would like some insider help and if there is a different approach with male vs female.)
They show signs, but theirs tend to be more subtle than most other parrot species. So, you'll hear a lot of people saying that their eclectus bit them out of "nowhere". But truth is, you just need to learn their body language. Here are some links that may help in terms of biting. The first is for both identifying why the bites are happening and avoiding them in the first place, and the second is for dealing with biting and teaching bite pressure.
BRAINSTORMING: Biting Parrots
Bite pressure training?

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
3rd: When a female is showing hormonal behavior, what do you recommend to stop her from doing this?
Tis was perfectly covered in Charmed's answer. Nothing more to add.

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
4th: I read that eclectus like to eat eggs if they are well cooked. ... Could I feed the female eggs that she has laid or is that a "don't do it"? (Don't look at me that way.) Can they have cooked steak?
Great point made by Charmed here as well. An excess of eggs can lead to arteriosclerosis. I will give my ekkies a slice of a boiled egg maybe one day out of a month. Sometimes twice. If at all. Point is, it's given sparingly. Something of a rare treat. And even then, only a slice. I do give the boiled shells for calcium on a more regular basis, however. No, I would not feed a female ekkie an egg she has laid. And a hard no on the steak. The only meat I would allow, on an exceedingly rare basis, is grilled, baked or boiled chicken without seasoning. Or cooked fish. But again, it should be a rare event. The novelty value of those foods does not outweigh the dangers of arteriosclerosis.


Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
5th: Are they possible to potty train? I have potty trained a budgie before but... that's a budgie. Took a ton of patience. Potty training my daughter took more patience. Rabbits are the easiest to potty train.
Potty training parrots is definitely doable. Just observe and get a feel for how often your ekkie guy or gal poops (usually between 30 minutes and an hour for ekkies), then make sure to bring them over to a place that is acceptable for droppings right before you figure they'll be ready to go. Then verbally praise when they drop it, while using whatever word you've chosen for that activity. And the practice is different for flighted vs. non flighted birds. For instance, with my male ekkie, Jolly, who is a very experienced flier, I did this practice enough until he understood that I wanted him to fly over to the tree stand when he was ready. So, nowadays, I don't really need to think about it. But with Maya, who has her full feathers but refuses to fly (she was never given the chance to fledge in her prior home), I always keep in mind how long she has been on me, and watch as well for her usual tell-tales that she's ready to go. (Shuffling uncomfortably back and forth.) Then I put her on the tree stand and tell her to "go poop".

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
6th: I live in the USA. So far I've only found one Eclectus breeder and while they do have a lot of positive reviews, there were two negative reviews that concerned me and the fact their aviary isn't open to the public is more concerning (am I overreacting? Please let me know.) What USA (preferably northern Illinois / Southern Wisconsin area but I will make the drive cross country if need be) breeders and aviaries do you recommend? I don't want to adopt a re-homed bird. I feel like that would be for a more experienced Eclectus owner. Plus I wanna raise it from 4 months old.
Always research a breeder thoroughly. And, as mentioned earlier, ekkies can take their time with weaning. While some ekkies have weaned as early as 3-4 months, others can take up to 7-9 months. The important thing here is to find a breeder who "abundance weans". Such breeders allow their birds to wean at their own pace, as opposed to "force weaning", which most will want to do since it is more cost-effective for them. But it's worth it to get one who was abundance weaned, as they will tend to have a gentler disposition.

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
7th: Will they get "too jealous" if a newborn baby arrives? I DO NOT want more kids. I have a son and a daughter. But, accidents can happen. If jealousy does happen, how do I correct this? How do I go around this?
Depends on the bird's individual personality. Best thing to do is to make sure that you always find time for your bird. How you would deal with negative behaviors that spring from this varies according to the behavior being exhibited, so there's no general go to.

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
8th: What is the most humane training method to teach an eclectus not to scream?
Behavior extinction. Basically, you want to discourage the bad behavior by leaving the room or turning your back, and then encourage the good behavior (Quiet or more acceptable vocalizations) with your return and with treats and such. Please note, though, that this is for excessive screaming. All parrots will vocalize to some extent. Flock calls, for instance, are quite natural. This is when they call out once or twice when you are not in the room. In this instance, I would just respond by saying hello or whatever and keep it moving. This usually reassures them that you are around and okay. It's what they do in the wild and not to be discouraged.

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
9th: What type of people would make the best person to will the bird to if something happens to me? Should I educate my friend that has an african grey about eclectus parrots? Should I just rely on my spouse or kids? (I love horses and every year there is an equestrian that is killed by their love of being an equestrian. There's always a risk when you deal with an animal that weighs as much as a car and has a mind of it's own.)

I want to be as educated as possible when I get this bird as they do live a long time (I'm 29 now, so by the time I get this bird they will pass away by the time I'm in my early 70's if not later).

I know each bird has their own unique personality, so considering this all the information I can get to prepare myself and my family to have this bird not only survive but thrive as well as keeping the house hold happy will help even if it is information as simple as how to train them to enjoy a shower and stealing treats from someone's hand is bad manners.
As has been mentioned, ekkies have a longer lifespan than you believed. The reason for the discrepancy is that knowledge about eclectus parrots is relatively new in comparison to most other currently kept parrots. People did not know how sensitive ekkies are when it comes to diet. Feeding a diet of all seeds is bad for any parrot, but it is far worse for eclectus. As such, people initially thought ekkies only lived between 16 and 30 years. The truth, however, is that they can live upwards of 60, much like the comparatively sized African Grey.

As time went on, we've also come to learn that most pellets are also bad for eclectus parrots. (Though even some vets don't realize this, yet.) Many can cause adverse reactions such as toe-tapping, wing-flipping, plucking, and general irritability.

Hope this all helps, and props to you for doing your research so far ahead of time. That is a sign of someone who will make a very good parront.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2019, 11:31 AM
bug_n_flock's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Many
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Isolated Holler in the Appalachian Wilderness
Thanks: 805
Thanked 1,239 Times in 543 Posts
bug_n_flock is on a distinguished road
Re: Eclectus: preparation guidance for first time owner

I don't know ekkies, sorry.



But I will be another person saying that a breeder not letting you visit is not always a bad sign. I breed budgies and soon enough plan to breed cockatiels and eventually a few more species. We run a mostly closed facility: we do not allow prospective parrot parents to visit. We are VERY selective about who we let visit, in fact.



This is done for many reasons. We are worried about theft, rumors, disease, stress on the birds... the list goes on. Strangers are a wild card, and I don't like to take risks with my birds when avoidable.
__________________
That crazy chick with a bird farm in the wilderness
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 10-22-2019, 08:21 AM
Junior Member
Parrots:
Currently looking for one
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Illinois
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 6 Posts
4toes_1beak is on a distinguished road
Re: Eclectus: preparation guidance for first time owner

Quote: Originally Posted by Anansi View Post

The biggest issue here would be the dogs. My advice here, and I can't stress this enough, is to never forget that dogs are predators. Never trust them with your birds. Ever. No matter how sweet, cuddly and peaceful they may typically be with other animals. There have been so many stories of birds and dogs (or even more so with cats) who seemed to be best buddies, only for things to go horrendously wrong one day seemingly out of the blue.

As for kids, I'd just suggest that you curb their roughhousing type play whenever they're near the birds. I have two young, very energetic, boys. They are now 11 and 8, but they were only 5 and 2 when I brought my first ekkie home. The main thing here was teaching my boys not to do all kinds of crazy play in the family room, as that's where I keep my ekkies. This makes a difference, because that kind of craziness can really stress them out. (Same for screaming in anger. They are sensitive to emotion.)

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
2nd: Do eclectus show any warning signs before they bite or are they like cockatoos where there is no visual warning sign you just feel this heightened energy all of the sudden? How do I train them not to bite? (wiki-how had a special thing on eclectus no-bite training but I would like some insider help and if there is a different approach with male vs female.)
They show signs, but theirs tend to be more subtle than most other parrot species. So, you'll hear a lot of people saying that their eclectus bit them out of "nowhere". But truth is, you just need to learn their body language. Here are some links that may help in terms of biting. The first is for both identifying why the bites are happening and avoiding them in the first place, and the second is for dealing with biting and teaching bite pressure.
BRAINSTORMING: Biting Parrots
Bite pressure training?



Tis was perfectly covered in Charmed's answer. Nothing more to add.



Great point made by Charmed here as well. An excess of eggs can lead to arteriosclerosis. I will give my ekkies a slice of a boiled egg maybe one day out of a month. Sometimes twice. If at all. Point is, it's given sparingly. Something of a rare treat. And even then, only a slice. I do give the boiled shells for calcium on a more regular basis, however. No, I would not feed a female ekkie an egg she has laid. And a hard no on the steak. The only meat I would allow, on an exceedingly rare basis, is grilled, baked or boiled chicken without seasoning. Or cooked fish. But again, it should be a rare event. The novelty value of those foods does not outweigh the dangers of arteriosclerosis.




Potty training parrots is definitely doable. Just observe and get a feel for how often your ekkie guy or gal poops (usually between 30 minutes and an hour for ekkies), then make sure to bring them over to a place that is acceptable for droppings right before you figure they'll be ready to go. Then verbally praise when they drop it, while using whatever word you've chosen for that activity. And the practice is different for flighted vs. non flighted birds. For instance, with my male ekkie, Jolly, who is a very experienced flier, I did this practice enough until he understood that I wanted him to fly over to the tree stand when he was ready. So, nowadays, I don't really need to think about it. But with Maya, who has her full feathers but refuses to fly (she was never given the chance to fledge in her prior home), I always keep in mind how long she has been on me, and watch as well for her usual tell-tales that she's ready to go. (Shuffling uncomfortably back and forth.) Then I put her on the tree stand and tell her to "go poop".



Always research a breeder thoroughly. And, as mentioned earlier, ekkies can take their time with weaning. While some ekkies have weaned as early as 3-4 months, others can take up to 7-9 months. The important thing here is to find a breeder who "abundance weans". Such breeders allow their birds to wean at their own pace, as opposed to "force weaning", which most will want to do since it is more cost-effective for them. But it's worth it to get one who was abundance weaned, as they will tend to have a gentler disposition.



Depends on the bird's individual personality. Best thing to do is to make sure that you always find time for your bird. How you would deal with negative behaviors that spring from this varies according to the behavior being exhibited, so there's no general go to.

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
8th: What is the most humane training method to teach an eclectus not to scream?
Behavior extinction. Basically, you want to discourage the bad behavior by leaving the room or turning your back, and then encourage the good behavior (Quiet or more acceptable vocalizations) with your return and with treats and such. Please note, though, that this is for excessive screaming. All parrots will vocalize to some extent. Flock calls, for instance, are quite natural. This is when they call out once or twice when you are not in the room. In this instance, I would just respond by saying hello or whatever and keep it moving. This usually reassures them that you are around and okay. It's what they do in the wild and not to be discouraged.

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak
9th: What type of people would make the best person to will the bird to if something happens to me? Should I educate my friend that has an african grey about eclectus parrots? Should I just rely on my spouse or kids? (I love horses and every year there is an equestrian that is killed by their love of being an equestrian. There's always a risk when you deal with an animal that weighs as much as a car and has a mind of it's own.)

I want to be as educated as possible when I get this bird as they do live a long time (I'm 29 now, so by the time I get this bird they will pass away by the time I'm in my early 70's if not later).

I know each bird has their own unique personality, so considering this all the information I can get to prepare myself and my family to have this bird not only survive but thrive as well as keeping the house hold happy will help even if it is information as simple as how to train them to enjoy a shower and stealing treats from someone's hand is bad manners.
As has been mentioned, ekkies have a longer lifespan than you believed. The reason for the discrepancy is that knowledge about eclectus parrots is relatively new in comparison to most other currently kept parrots. People did not know how sensitive ekkies are when it comes to diet. Feeding a diet of all seeds is bad for any parrot, but it is far worse for eclectus. As such, people initially thought ekkies only lived between 16 and 30 years. The truth, however, is that they can live upwards of 60, much like the comparatively sized African Grey.

As time went on, we've also come to learn that most pellets are also bad for eclectus parrots. (Though even some vets don't realize this, yet.) Many can cause adverse reactions such as toe-tapping, wing-flipping, plucking, and general irritability.

Hope this all helps, and props to you for doing your research so far ahead of time. That is a sign of someone who will make a very good parront.

Thank you for this valid information! Yeah I wouldn't trust a dog around any animal smaller than them. The house will be divided. I was more worried aboutthe barking stressing out the bird. My golden will bay like a bloodhound when she smells an intact male walk by....

Your information leads me to one more question...
If I adopted a bird that never had a change to fly before getting their feathers clipped, is it possible to let the feathers grow and teach the bird to fly? I want the bird to know it can fly for a variety of reasons. If I have to take the bird to my spouse's friend's stable to have enough room in the arena for her to learn to fly then so be it. (They love birds and have ducks solely as pets so they'd be all for it.)
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to 4toes_1beak For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (10-23-2019)
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 10-23-2019, 08:39 AM
Anansi's Avatar
Super Moderator
Parrots:
Maya (Female Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Jolly (Male Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Bixby (Male, red-sided eclectus. RIP), Suzie (Male cockatiel. RIP)
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Somerset,NJ
Thanks: 77,768
Thanked 51,520 Times in 16,286 Posts
Anansi will become famous soon enoughAnansi will become famous soon enough
Re: Eclectus: preparation guidance for first time owner

Quote: Originally Posted by 4toes_1beak View Post
Your information leads me to one more question...
If I adopted a bird that never had a change to fly before getting their feathers clipped, is it possible to let the feathers grow and teach the bird to fly? I want the bird to know it can fly for a variety of reasons. If I have to take the bird to my spouse's friend's stable to have enough room in the arena for her to learn to fly then so be it. (They love birds and have ducks solely as pets so they'd be all for it.)
Excellent question! Yes, developing such a bird's skills in flight is absolutely possible. Though you want to start small rather than big. Having the option of a large stable for flight practice is awesome... for a future option. But when starting out, you want a situation with more control. And one that won't overwhelm your bird.

My very first ekkie, Bixby (who was born with a disease and has since passed), was not allowed the chance to fully fledge when he was of age, as the store policy was to clip or harness. Flight was not allowed.

Once I got him home, I gave him flight sessions where I worked with him in a small room closed off from the rest of the house. For tools, I used two adjustable height training perches. To start, I set the perches to the same height and set them around 2 inches apart. I set him on one, and then tapped the other while using the chosen command word. Mine, at the time, was "target".

Whenever Bixby did as I asked, I made a big deal about it, praising him enthusiastically and giving him his favorite treat. Once he was reliably going from perch to perch on command, I increased the space between them to four inches. Wash, rinse, repeat. Always being careful, btw, not to make training sessions last beyond his effective attention span. For Bixby, it was around 25 minutes. For other birds, it might be as little as 5 or 10. Every bird is different. Always consider your bird's individual personality.

I continued on with these incremental increases in perch separation until Bixby had to hop from one to the other. And then a wing flap from one to another. And then, finally, he would need to fly from one to another. Doing it this way allowed him to slowly build confidence in his abilities. And doing it in a small room kept setbacks small. On those occasions where Bixby got excited for whatever reason and took off flying only to crash into a wall, it was in a room small enough that he did not have enough space to build up to a dangerous speed. Not much more than his ego was bruised upon impact.

Once Bixby was reliably flying the length of the room, I then started to increase the difficulty level. And by this point, training was assisted by Bixby's enjoyment of flight itself. The training became a thing of enjoyment in and of itself. My warmest memories of him center around the way he would flash his tail about in a flourish whenever he would pull off a new flight skill. You could see him taking pride in his accomplishment.

To increase the difficulty, I began changing the heights of each perch so he could practice the skill of flying from a low elevation to high (strength training), and from high to low (Believe it or not, a very important lesson. Flying from a high point to a low one is a separate skill set, and some birds who fly out of a window or door and up into a tree sometimes don't fly back down to their person because they simply don't have the skill to do so).

Once his strength had increased to the point that he could fly from the floor up to a perch, and his skill had progressed to the point where he could fly from a high elevation down to a low, I started working on his recall. This was a natural progression, as recall is basically targeting to yourself and, at this point, Bixby was completely reliable with targeting.

Then the harder skill, if your bird is bonded to you, is getting him to fly away from your hand/arm and to a perch. They just don't want to leave. But again, you work in increments, here. Tap the perch, then put him on it if he won't go and react enthusiastically. Then work up to the point that he'll fly to where you target him.

Finally, once he has this all down, you can move him out of the small room and into the house/apartment proper for bigger scale flight training. (Just make sure to acclimate him to the whole house/apartment first with several preparatory walkthroughs, first.) And once he's good with flying around your house, and completely reliable with recall, you can take him to your friend's stable to show off what he's got.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2019, 01:33 PM
Junior Member
Parrots:
I am 70 and been studying parrots. There are only 5 species that aren't dander dusty and the Eclectus is my choice of them. I am retired and on a limited income, can't afford to buy but will rescue
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Waiteville, WV
Thanks: 1
Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
1oldparroter is on a distinguished road
Re: Eclectus: preparation guidance for first time owner

YouTube.com and search on Eclectus, wingsNpaws or BirdTrix. There are a jillion video's that will give you visual and auditory data, we can't possibly impart in printed forum's. By All Means, come back to the forum and ask about the video. A lot of them seem breed specific but there are a lot out there. Watch them and ask about your " understanding's " here. jh
PS: Being a non-smoker is important, no Teflon cookware, scented candles; learn the things that will harm a bird and rid them. Birds have sensitive lungs. With that in mind here are 3 video's " I " think are important and may introduce some of you to outside visual's to think on. 1
2
3
cul jh
Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Species Specific > Eclectus

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Bird Owner - Sort Of - In Need of Pro Tips and Guidance MVBrandt Questions and Answers 20 12-31-2014 02:04 PM
Long-time bird owner, first time conure owner. Grellium New Members Welcome 5 07-09-2014 02:20 PM
Preparation for the holidays jroyal Eclectus 1 11-17-2013 02:55 PM
my freeflight preparation parrot14 Free Flight 34 04-06-2013 02:38 AM
Hello Everyone First time eclectus bird owner charliebrown New Members Welcome 1 01-08-2011 12:23 AM



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.