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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 08-30-2018, 10:08 PM
Nym Nym is offline
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Re: Inherited IRN

Extra info:

I was never close to the relative, but I did enjoy spending time with Elvis when we had the rare family get-together (oops haha) I'm not sure how long he had Elvis before passing, but he was a rescue bird as my aunt is a vet nurse and worked at an animal shelter at the time, where they would put down birds if they weren't friendly. She obviously didn't want this to happen so she had a habit of bringing them home and giving them to any family member that would take them. Because of this the relative happened to have at least 2 birds called Elvis in a row. There's always been an Elvis the bird for as long as I can remember, how long he had the current Elvis I have no idea, but he is definitely mature (he is at the very minimum 4 years old).

I have bought him a larger cage as the previous was too small for him in my eyes. The thing I'm most concerned about is his attachment to his stuffed bird toy. He spends all day staring at it and squawks at you till you shake it (it makes a noise), and shrieks if you take it away. He'll stray away from it when I pay attention to him but he keeps going back and forth between me and the toy. His attachment to this inanimate object worries me but is this normal? Should I take the toy away?

The reason I thought he might enjoy the company of the other birds (even if they never meet outside of the cage) is because a native parrot flew in while I had the doors open for fresh air and Elvis seemed to get quite excited and chirped happily(?) to the bird, without showing signs of aggression (not ruffling his feathers, ect). The native (a Rosella) and him looked at each other and neither seemed to be fearful, just curious.

He is in my bedroom away from the other birds (quarantined). The closest avian vet is an hour away, but we do have one at least. We don't have a bird groomer as my roommate clips her own birds wings and all that. Elvis's wings haven't been clipped due to his aggressivness and habit of biting. I also didn't want to stress him any more at the this point in time.

If I was going to rename him it would probably be to Artemis which I suppose sounds like Elvis. That or Moon Pie affectionately.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-31-2018, 07:44 PM
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Re: Inherited IRN

Lol! I called my ex's Newfoundland dog Moon Pie---among other things (all loving).

I call my current bird 1000 names affectionately, but I still call her by her own name from time-to-time, as that is what she has known the longest (and that is what I have listed on her official records).


The bottom line is, as long as you occasionally say the original name, there is no reason why you cant informally say the others lol (and then you don't even have to worry about the ethics of changing it)....just my opinion. I never changed my bird's name (as much as I dislike it) because, I figure it is hers, and actually, it kind of fits her from time-to-time.
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 09-22-2018, 12:15 PM
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Re: Inherited IRN

Quote: Originally Posted by LeslieA View Post
Actually, IRNs are more prone to bluffing than many birds.
I suggest you visit (***website link removed, as competing forum sites are not allowed***) and also visit an AV asap.
Might I ask, who was that website written by? Are they trained in the science of behavior with a clear understanding of why behavior occurs?

I ask because people can have parrots for 20, 40 or more years and still not understand a behavior correctly unless they do more research into animal behaviors.


The article I linked to is from a professional animal trainer that specializes in birds. She was training zoo animals before she ever started training pet birds.

https://www.blogger.com/profile/09023471815028634939



Ringnecks may be "more prone" to doing a specific behavior, but that does not mean that that behavior is bluffing. It does not mean that the bird "acts all tough" and "fake bites". It means that this species will bite as a last resort but they are trying to *CLEARLY* communicate with a human in the most non-confrontational way. It's not "bluffing", it's communication.


It's a little different way of thinking about things... kind of like a dog that enjoys playing with tennis balls. Does the dog...

a.) enjoy chasing balls
b.) enjoy fetching balls that are thrown

Although these two behaviors may seem the same to us, they are actually two separate behaviors. My last dog *LOVED* to chase balls, but he never fetched them! One behavior is going after the ball, the other is bringing the ball back, from where-ever it is. A dog that enjoys fetching may randomly come across a ball that was not thrown and bring it back to his/her human. Of course a dog can enjoy doing both behaviors!
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Last edited by GaleriaGila; 09-23-2018 at 03:23 PM.
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 09-22-2018, 04:40 PM
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Re: Inherited IRN

Wonderful input from our wonderful members. I'm so proud to be part of this place.

As for avian vets, here are some links.
Certified Avian Vets
https://abvp.com/animal-owners/find-an-abvp-specialist/
If none are near you...
Avian Veterinarians
http://www.aav.org/search/custom.asp?id=1803
In my opinion, any of the vets listed here should be better than a regular vet.
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Old 09-22-2018, 07:41 PM
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Re: Inherited IRN

Was thinking of another way that it might make more sense....


I've come across a lot of people who have said "My bird hates me, they are so aggressive!". It's a new bird, in a new environment, with people the bird isn't familiar with. I asked them to clarify.

Is the bird aggressive? Does the bird go out of their way to attack and bite you?
Or is the bird afraid? Avoids you as much as possible and tries to get away?

In each situation where I asked this, the response has been "My bird is afraid". This instantly changed the way that they thought about their birds and how to interact with them. They learned to have more patience and give the bird more time to settle in.


I'm not saying that ringnecks *don't* do a behavior that is termed as "bluffing", as they certainly do it! What I'm trying to say is, is that they don't bluff. Like the bird that bites out of fear, not aggression, this isn't "bluffing".

The way that most people use the term "bluffing" is to convey that the birds wont bite if you just ignore their bluffs... but then, you do exactly that, and what happens? You get bitten... What else has just happened? You taught your bird to bite because the bird has been "screaming" at you that *I WILL BITE*. Number one recommendation when it comes to biting? Ignore it. The bird screams? Ignore it. Any undesired behavior is recommended to ignore. Think about how frustrated the bird must be getting when he or she is trying to communicate with you in the only manners it knows how and all you do is ignore them?

And as far as ignoring goes... that's extremely disrespectful to the animal, particularly when it comes to biting. I mean, if it was a dog, a tiger or any other large animal, you wouldn't just stand there and allow that animal to maul your flesh! You'd want to separate yourself from that animal! But when it comes to birds? It's like people have some sort of fetish or gluttony for pain! Like... Here's my finger, bite me! But I haven't come across anyone who *ENJOYS* being bitten... so it's rather baffling why we allow this behavior to occur when neither the human nor the bird enjoys it!



What I would like people to do is to learn that biting can be a form of exploration or communication and should not be discouraged nor ignored, but rather redirected and avoided. The lunging behavior, that has been coined as "bluffing", is not in fact actual bluffing but a form of communication.

If we can change the way we see these behaviors for what they really are, and change how we approach our birds, then we can better help the birds communicate with us in ways that don't involve violence. (i.e. biting!)
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Old 09-23-2018, 09:56 PM
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Re: Inherited IRN

If you choose to follow these training methods and to disbelieve scientific research, then you deserve what you get. And by using these training techniques you'll have a well- fed, social genius on your hands and you can also let him free-fly outside. Enjoy your IRN! No doubt my IRN experiences and knowledge don't matter. Enjoy your perfect bird!
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Old 09-23-2018, 11:28 PM
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Re: Inherited IRN

Quote: Originally Posted by LeslieA View Post
If you choose to follow these training methods and to disbelieve scientific research, then you deserve what you get. And by using these training techniques you'll have a well- fed, social genius on your hands and you can also let him free-fly outside. Enjoy your IRN! No doubt my IRN experiences and knowledge don't matter. Enjoy your perfect bird!
Can you clarify... what scientific research?

Sorry, I'm confused.
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Old 09-24-2018, 06:46 AM
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Re: Inherited IRN

I love the fact that Elvis/whosname has found a great place to live.
Thank you!

If the name fits -keep it, otherwise just change it.
He is your bird now (and you are his) - so no harm in redefining the relationship he has with humans by changing his name as well.

Just go by the "gaining trust" link you've already found-- all succesfull training is basicly the same:
if the bird feels he has something to gain ... he will do it!
And food is a great motivator!

not like in the past: semi-starve them and only feed them when he does what you want/ we've all outgrown that (I hope).
Bribe your way into his heart (via the stomach)

I think I would ask someone else to remove the toy-
it sounds cruel, but when Japie decided to court a toy-parrot he got just as hormonal etc. as he would have been with a real mate.
And as much as I love my birds...I like my fingers etc. better.
So yes- I am terrible, but I ruined his hormonal party :P

If a dog fixates on a ball while you try to teach it to "sit" you remove the ball from his sight- otherwise poor doggy will never be able to focus propperly.
You want to build a bond with your bird - but ask him to cheat in his marriage with the stuffed animal...
ditch the distraction and let him move on to real living beings.

(just me, no websites involved )

Last edited by ChristaNL; 09-24-2018 at 06:48 AM.
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