Parrot Forum Header Left  
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > ParrotForums.com > New Members Welcome

New Members Welcome Post here to introduce yourself! Tell us a bit about your bird(s), hobbies, setup, etc! Parrot Owners Introduction

View Poll Results: First bird?
Pionus 0 0%
Ringneck 1 11.11%
Cockatiel 8 88.89%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 9. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-15-2018, 07:17 PM
Junior Member
Parrots:
None (yet!)
Join Date: Jan 2018
Thanks: 5
Thanked 5 Times in 2 Posts
louisepowell is on a distinguished road
Talking Pionus as a first bird

Hello! My name is Louise, and Iím thinking about getting a bird. Iíve never owned a bird before, but I have done many months of research and Iíve narrowed my choices down to three species: a ring neck, a cockatiel, or a Pionus. Of these three, the Pionus are definitely my favorites, but I want to make sure I can take good care of them if I have one.

A bit about myself: Iím thirteen, and I live in California. I do go to school, but I mostly stay home on weekends and afternoons. I wake up early (6:00~6:30) and my family goes to bed early (9:00~9:30ish), so I will have a lot of time in the morning to take care of my bird.

So, here are my questions:
Would I be able to take good care of a Pionus?
Is 32x23 a good cage size for a Pionus?(Iíve read many different opinions on this, but couldnít decide)

Thank you!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to louisepowell For This Useful Post:
Scott  (02-16-2018)
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2018, 03:54 AM
LordTriggs's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Rio (Yellow sided conure) sadly no longer with us
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Surrey, UK
Thanks: 2,413
Thanked 4,055 Times in 2,088 Posts
LordTriggs is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

unfortunately I'm gonna have to sound like most typical adults.

13 is a bit too young to have a pet bird. If it was primarily your parents and you played/interacted with them then it would be a different story. A lot is gonna happen over the next 5 or so years. I was pretty much a hermit at age 13, then 14/15 I was out every single night until well past late. Another thing which you do have to remember is money. Birds are far from cheap and it's why they were a status symbol in the past, the actual bird itself is the cheapest of your expenses! For example for a £100 conure (roughly $130) I ended up spending over £1500 (Nearing $2000) on stuff and that was before he arrived. Plus you need to have funds constantly away for that bird for toys food and vet visits which you should have 1 or 2 check ups a year which for an Avian Vet is easily over $100 a pop and if they get ill they can quickly rack up a bill over $1000. Now I'm fairly sure parents won't be exactly thrilled to pay that (my mum is barely happy paying vet bills for her dogs and they're cheap!) Plus also think of they do become ill you need to get to a vet fast and if your parents aren't around or just don't want to do the drive then you're stuck unable to go.

Perhaps for the moment it's best to hold fire on a bird but having said that you could see if you can volunteer at a nearby rescue! They're always on the look out for a helping hand, you get to spend time around birds that I for example will never get close to (darn southern UK with it's lack of crazy bird people) get taught first hand by experienced people and you get to have a break when you're not at the rescue helping. And Hey you never know your parents may fall in love with one or see you getting chummy with one and decide to take them home. If not speaking as one of those "young adults" 13 to 21 or so is going to fly by faster than you think
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to LordTriggs For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (02-16-2018), Flboy Supporting Member (02-17-2018), louisepowell (02-17-2018), Scott  (02-16-2018)
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2018, 06:35 AM
chris-md's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Parker - male Eclectus Aphrodite - red throated conure (RIP)
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Thanks: 1,419
Thanked 5,601 Times in 2,122 Posts
chris-md is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

Hello Kvaness - it certainly does need to be reiterated. It all boils down to the fact that the average bird has 6-7 houses during its lifetime. this is a huge problem.

“I got a bird as a kid, but I now don’t have time for it because I’m going to college, I need to rehome” is a refrain we often hear. And it’s tragic. You knew this was coming, why did you buy a bird??

“My bird bit me, I want to rehome it”....you do know parrots can bite when you got it, didn’t you?

“My bird is mean to my wife, I need to rehome it”...did you do basic research to find many birds only bond with one person? Had you done the basic of research and known this ahead of time, you’d have made a more responsible decision as to whether you want to deal with this behavior.

Birds are usually treated as throwaway pets - the slightest inconvenience and the bird is cast out. which is horrible because birds actually bond with you, like dogs or cats...mainly dogs :-P. These bird live 20-80 years. When you bought the bird you were signing up for a huge commitment, not a goldfish.

We here actively do what we can to advocate responsible ownership and decision makingthat reduces the need for rehoming. which means children with unstable life shortly ahead of them are not great candidates for parrot ownership of any kind - the potential for rehoming their bird is too great, and readily foreseeable in the first place.

Many of us had birds as kids. It’s not saying kids can’t care for birds. You’ve got to think ahead. As a kid, what about college? What about housing after college. God forbid a 15 year old buy a macaw - 10 years from now, as a 25 year old that kid will be living in an apartment, where macaws can’t live. What happens to the Macaw? REHOME. You have to plan ahead, because you did sign up for this long term commitment. Long term commitment means looking ahead. For older parrot owners, that literally means writing the bird into the will. Estate planning.

The previous poster had it right: it’s one thing if it’s primarily the parents bird. Parents are stable, not going anywhere, and you have full parental buy in. Birds not going anywhere. But if the bird carr and ownership squarely on the kids shoulders and parents aren’t interested, that’s where he problem comes in. And that’s where we start saying “wait until we’ll after college. Now is not the time”

Last edited by chris-md; 02-16-2018 at 07:08 AM.
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to chris-md For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (02-16-2018), LordTriggs (02-16-2018), louisepowell (02-17-2018), Scott  (02-16-2018)
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2018, 08:24 AM
Anansi's Avatar
Super Moderator
Parrots:
Maya (Female Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Jolly (Male Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Bixby (Male, red-sided eclectus. RIP), Suzie (Male cockatiel. RIP)
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Somerset,NJ
Thanks: 76,716
Thanked 50,429 Times in 15,968 Posts
Anansi will become famous soon enoughAnansi will become famous soon enough
Re: Pionus as a first bird

Quote: Originally Posted by Kvaness View Post
I am sorry for causing an arguement. I understand the points being made. I just like to encourage others.
Not an argument. Just differing points of view. Which is exactly what the OP likely needs.

Truth is, I have seen kids on the younger side who turned out to be good parronts. But they tend to be the exception rather than the rule. And usually have the full support of their parents, financially speaking. And the only way to have that full support is if said parents are fully aware of what they are getting into, financially speaking.

And fact is, since at 13 you don't really know what your life will look like at 19 or so, even if all the financial considerations and such are taken into account it still comes down to chance. Your life might happen down a track conducive to parrot ownership. Or you might find yourself in a situation where you need to rehome. Just so many variables to call it with any degree of certainty.
__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Anansi For This Useful Post:
Flboy Supporting Member (02-17-2018), LordTriggs (02-16-2018), louisepowell (02-17-2018), Scott  (02-16-2018), smbrds (02-16-2018)
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2018, 08:44 AM
LordTriggs's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Rio (Yellow sided conure) sadly no longer with us
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Surrey, UK
Thanks: 2,413
Thanked 4,055 Times in 2,088 Posts
LordTriggs is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

oh in no way an argument, just a different opinion which is the best way to get a full picture of it, much like anything in life. Though if the parents understand the effort, time and money required for even a Tiel then heck why not have a feathered family pet? The key word though is understand in that previous sentence. Like I say if they're not really on board there's always options like volunteering at a rescue. I wish I had the opportunity to do so when I was younger but bird rescues work weird over here.

In either scenario though I wish the best of luck
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to LordTriggs For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (02-16-2018), louisepowell (02-17-2018), Scott  (02-16-2018), smbrds (02-16-2018)
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2018, 10:38 AM
Scott's Avatar
Super Moderator
Parrots:
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo / RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Thanks: 76,978
Thanked 39,173 Times in 13,852 Posts
Scott is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

Welcome Louise, kudos for seeking advice before taking the plunge with a companion bird!

You'll find many well stated opinions here, but it is up to you to make the best decision, keeping in mind the bird has no choice. If you are willing to make a deep and long-term commitment and have the backing (ethically and financially) of your parents, the best candidate is a cockatiel. For reasons of size, temperament, and initial cost, they can be an ideal first bird.

I am so proud of our members willing to give respectful advice from all angles, particularly when sharing first-hand accounts!
__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Scott For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (02-16-2018), smbrds (02-16-2018)
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 07:51 AM
Junior Member
Parrots:
None (yet!)
Join Date: Jan 2018
Thanks: 5
Thanked 5 Times in 2 Posts
louisepowell is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

Thank you for all of the feedback! After thinking long and hard, I’ve realized that of I do get a bird, they are probably going to be a cockatiel. Thank you so much to everyone for this helpful post!
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to louisepowell For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (02-17-2018), chris-md (02-17-2018), Flboy Supporting Member (02-17-2018), Scott  (02-17-2018)
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 10:59 AM
Carl_Power's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Quaker Parrot
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: England
Thanks: 177
Thanked 713 Times in 327 Posts
Carl_Power is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

Hi. I second everyones advice and i think Ring necks are a lot more for experienced bird owners from my research. Take care x
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2018, 11:12 AM
bug_n_flock's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Many
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Isolated Holler in the Appalachian Wilderness
Thanks: 737
Thanked 1,104 Times in 487 Posts
bug_n_flock is on a distinguished road
Re: Pionus as a first bird

I got my first bird at 8 or 9 years old. Went to college, grew up, moved out. The birds came with me.

Age ain't nothing but a number. If you are dedicated and have the support of your family for vet visits and supplies, go for it. But be honest with yourself if you will still be dedicated in a couple of decades? I got my 'tiel when I was 11. He is now 16 years old and still going strong. Are you prepared for your friend to possibly(if you are lucky) live for 30 or more years? 'Tiels can and do reach these ages when cared for properly and in possession of good genes(some, despite our best efforts, do not make it nearly that long).

If you want to do it, DO IT. But don't fool yourself if you don't think you can handle it, be honest. In the end it is the bird to suffer if you are wrong. There are plenty of other wonderful pets for 13 year olds out there if you don't think a bird is do able right now(you still have most of your life to get a bird later). How about a pair of rats? Very smart and trainable, friendly and loving, but only live around 2-4 years usually.
__________________
That crazy chick with a bird farm in the wilderness
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to bug_n_flock For This Useful Post:
louisepowell (02-17-2018)
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > ParrotForums.com > New Members Welcome

Tags
beginner bird, cockatiel, pionus, ringneck

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Pionus MosaicMadness Pionus 10 12-14-2015 02:31 PM
Pionus with another bird. Lynsey Pionus 7 09-01-2015 01:06 AM
Considering Pionus as First-Time Bird LadyJemima Pionus 2 10-24-2014 11:54 AM
New bird problems (pionus) null Behavioral 31 10-27-2013 03:22 PM
A Pionus for me! schnidj Pionus 5 07-17-2011 01:41 PM



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.