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Old 01-13-2021, 03:30 PM
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Unhappy Where to take my biting caique

I have had a caique for over two years. I love her - when she isnít trying to attack me. She loves me one moment, and the next she will viciously try to attack me and draw blood. I have forgiven her bipolar behavior because I do love her and she is a unique parrot. But I just canít take it anymore. Itís gotten worse. Just recently it has become 75% of the time in attack mode and the rest she is normal. She bites real hard and always draws blood. I canít sell her to another owner because then she might do the same and then the new owner will try to get rid of her as well. I do still have feelings which is why I donít want her to end up like that. Just thrown around and not loved because of her problem. The question is, Where can I take her that she will hopefully be fixed and loved by someone else? Give her away to a professional? I really wouldnít want to remove her from my life but I just canít take it anymore. Itís not right after all I do for her. But then again I do understand she has a problem like a switch in her brain. I just donít know how to fix it. I shouldíve mentioned that Iím not the only person in my family who she does this to.
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Old 01-13-2021, 05:30 PM
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Re: Where to take my biting caique

You can say your location , we might have a member offer to take her. But still do your due diligence, read threads they have and posts they have made and ask questions. Beware of any one who joined just to take your bird.

Now not to shame you at all! But you do not have a bi polar parrot, you have a failure to communicate. And perhaps a loss of trust, and even fear of hands can easily develop in parrots. And you can be reinforcing bites by mistake.

Biting issues can be easy but usually complex to address and take time and effort to overcome. Its also hard to share advice in writing like this. I will try and others likely will to. If you are interested. You have to start out that all bites are your fault mindset.

This article cover normal body language, sbd behavior, abd some on bites and screaming
https://lafeber.com/pet-birds/bird-behavior/
" Aggression Yes, sometimes aggression is normal behavior. Some birds get hormonal in the spring and may try to protect their cage. Others may not like a certain way of being handled, or are perhaps acting out of jealousy. Whatever the case, aggression always has a cause and can be quelled once the cause is discovered and handled appropriately."
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Last edited by Laurasea; 01-13-2021 at 05:36 PM.
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Old 01-13-2021, 05:38 PM
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Re: Where to take my biting caique

Continuing
" Birds do bite a lot more in captivity, usually because their boundaries are being pushed too far. All birds have a threshold of what they can handle before they lash out with a bite. There are other good reasons for a bird to bite as well. Here are some details about birds that bite:

Rule #1 The first rule in teaching a bird not to bite is not to get bitten. When a bird bites, he usually gets what he wants from the action — you will go away and leave him alone. You will also make a big fuss over the bite, which can be attractive to the bird, an animal that loves drama. Rather than reinforce the behavior, just don’t let it happen. Learn to “read” your bird so that you can assess the situation and get out before the bite happens.
Fear Biting You can hardly blame a bird that bites out of fear, even if the fear is unfounded. Look at the world from your bird’s perspective and try not to put him in situations that will frighten him.
Hormonal Biting In the spring when the days get longer, some birds are prompted into breeding mode and may become territorial of their housing area, of another bird, or of a person in the household. This can usually be dealt with by adjusting the amount of light the bird gets a day to less than 12 hours.
Jealousy Biting Sometimes, a bird will love his person so much, and then suddenly chomp down on him or her when someone else comes into the room. This actually has practical application in nature, although it is unpleasant. In the wild, a member of a pair will shoo away their beloved when another bird, a threat to the pair, flies into the territory. The “jealous” bird is simply protecting their mate and their relationship. If you know that your bird does this, make sure that you can put him down before someone comes into the room, and don’t ever allow this bird to ride on your shoulder.
Molting Some birds become irritable when they are molting and may not be feeling 100 percent. The same goes for birds that are ill or injured.
Counteractive Biting Some birds bite to prevent you from performing or not performing an action, for example a bird that bites when being brought back to the cage because he doesn’t want to be locked in. As an aside, some birds that don’t like to be put back into the cage pretend that they have wobbly legs and that they can’t stand up just as you put them away — what a great tactic for not stepping onto a perch! To prevent “put away” biting, don’t put your bird away every time you pick him up. Instead, do something fun, or play a little game before you put your bird away; mix it up so that the bird isn’t sure what’s coming next, and make it fun!"
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Old 01-13-2021, 06:27 PM
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Re: Where to take my biting caique

Hi hun yes from what I have read/know of Caiques, little bird big personalities. Two years old, combo of growing up and reaching maturity so some hormones kicking in? So like a spotty, unruly human teenager, all raging hormones etc. A lot can depend on how you have built up a relationship and trust, developed some training routines at the moment. If you keep a diary of events you may be able to see a pattern of when she is likely to go rogue and start biting. Ensure her food/diet is good, no junk, no colours, no sugar these will make things worse and shorten life span. Also ensure plenty of exercise and brain stimulation (toys etc).



I ask you to hang in there, it will get better but some of that depends on you. These are pretty quick learners so use that clever little brain and see if you can have some fun with training and building a better bond/trust at the same time. If you have any sort of safe pet carrier/back pack type of thing then also take her out to see the outside world, it's good for them.
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Old 01-14-2021, 01:05 AM
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Re: Where to take my biting caique

Quite possible your bird is in the hormonal fever pitch of puberty. How long the serious biting, was there a time this was not typical behavior? If indeed on the cusp of maturity, the worst of aggression will reduce over time. A few options along the way in any case:

Bite pressure training: Bite pressure training?
Target training may also help: Clicker & Target Training
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Old 01-14-2021, 08:18 AM
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Re: Where to take my biting caique

I would say that you are not communicating with each other well. As it isn't just you it isn't an issue of "hate", but more likely that you are not understanding each other.

I completely understand what you say about it not being fair, especially with everything you do for your parrot, but that's just not a helpful way to view things because it's putting human expectations on a non-human creature. It's not wrong that this is how you view it though, but it probably means parrots in general are not for you.

I think 2 types of people can be very happy with parrots: The first are people who actually don't mind working quite literally like slaves for creatures who occasionally grace us with their favour as long as (insert any of their ridiculous requirements and hormonal triggers here) isn't ignored for a nanosecond too long - the most extreme version of this being people who even welcome being pooped on!
The second are people who have no idea what parrots need and are happy to keep them in cages, feed them junk, force their will on them and look at them until they die in their teenage years, often to the complete surprise of the owner.
The middle ground is confusing and often heartbreaking.

If you don't feel you can offer a good home to your parrot and you don't feel they are adding to your life by what they can give you then do not feel bad for thinking about rehoming. There are probably 100s of things you could try to improve the communication, but ultimately, if that isn't what you thought you were buying into when you got a bird and that isn't something you want to do or are able to do them rehoming might be the way to go.

The most important thing is that you put in some hard work in vetting any potential home. I don't think you necessarily have to try and find a professional keeper. Someone with experience of birds who bite will probably be able to manage or even change your conures behaviour. Someone looking for their first bird, you are right, is far more likely to just put up for a while and then rehome and that isn't responsible.

If you see rehoming as a process that might take 3 or 4 months then you're more likely to have success and feel you have made the right decision. Good luck.
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Old 01-14-2021, 08:30 AM
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Re: Where to take my biting caique

They do absolutely out grow this!, your job is to expect, anticipate, and avoid bites! Please give it 6 months! Be absolutely sure you are not inadvertently stimulating these bouts!
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