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Old 06-17-2015, 10:41 AM
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Adopting parrots in 20's

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What sort of experience have people had with adopting birds in their 20's? Particularly macaws?
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Old 06-17-2015, 11:11 AM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

Do you mean the bird is in it's 20's or the humans
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Old 06-17-2015, 11:12 AM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

The birds?
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Old 06-17-2015, 11:31 AM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

Well I adopted my amazon when I was 19 and he was around 10 (possibly older, we'll never know for sure). He was difficult at first (aggressive, never been handled, never been trained, did not trust humans and some other 'undesirable' traits like screaming, though not the most serious case of it). I was patient (VERY patient lol) and persistent in getting him trained. He has blossomed into a wonderful companion bird over the years who is loving, social, enjoys training/learning and I wouldn't trade him for the world!

Older birds *can* come with issues that need to be addressed by the new owner. They can also instantly fall in love with their new owner or have been well cared for in their prior homes and have few to no issues. That all comes down to the individual bird and that birds past. IMO, one should hope for the best, but be prepared for some hard work if need be when considering adopting an older bird. Adopting an older bird isn't for everyone, but if you are willing to take on a potential challenge, it is one of the most rewarding experiences you can have to watch an older bird with a 'past' move on to being sweet and loving again
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Old 06-17-2015, 12:07 PM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

Quote: Originally Posted by haydyn23 View Post
What sort of experience have people had with adopting birds in their 20's? Particularly macaws?
Adopting an older bird is not bad at all. As with any bird, it's the "getting to know each other" phase that takes patience. The bird gets to know your routine, style, and surroundings, where they determine what they can get away with..ha ha ha. In turn your observing their habits ( from previuos owners) and their disposition.

I adopted Trixie, my major Mitchel Cockatoo when it was 45. I was the 5th owner for her. Kept her just about 24 years where she died of old age at just shy of 69 years old. We had our ups and downs in figuring each other out, but it all works out and we ended up as two best buddies. She was a great bird.

My opinion, There's absolutely nothing wrong with adopting an older bird
You'd be pleasantly surprised how easily they adapt.
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Old 06-17-2015, 01:32 PM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

This largely depends on the bird, and how they were raised and how set in their ways they are.

I've done this lots of times. The oldest bird I ever fostered was 60... and many of the birds I fostered were in their teens or twenties...

My most bonded bird (Ever!) came to me when she was 35.

My present 43 year old zon came to me when she was 35 or 36.

I had a macaw that was 32 when I got her, another of my Fosters was in her 40s. Most were in their teens. Maggie, my greenwing, was in her teens when I got her...

The benefits of adopting an older bird generally tend to be that the worst of the hormonal behaviors are already behind you, and many of them come already fairly well trained, or just in need of a basic refresher.

The downside is some of them are set in their ways. And some come with bad behaviors that need to be modified, and/or health issues related to abuse or neglect.

Birds that come from bad situations to good situations generally tend to turn around quickly, and seem to be especially grateful of their new situation once they settle in.

On the whole, my experience with older birds has been very positive.
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Old 06-17-2015, 05:47 PM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

I received a call in 2014 from distant family asking if I would take a parrot since his owner had passed. I had been looking at parrots and was trying to determine what type of parrot I would bring in our home for months when this call came in. This parrot was at the city pound, the police had to be involved in the death, very sad situation, but no fowl play.

When we went to pick up Buddy, he was in a police, mechanic bay office. They put him in a space separate from the other animals. Buddy is now a 25 yo parrot, he spent 20 years with his previous owner, a strong relationship. As now known as typical Buddy, he said "Hello!" as we walked in to see him. After we put his cage with him in the back seat of our double cab truck, we went to Sonic to get drinks. I heard a noise in the back seat, turned to look and found Buddy with his head pressed against the bars in a very clear "scratch me" position. I scratched his head, he let me! Since then he and I have built a fast, strong relationship. I let him control the pace.

I learned later how amazons are "quirky" and felt honored that on the first day in minutes he wanted a head scratch from me! I brought home an Ekkie in January 2015 and one major difference between them is I can shovel food in Buddy's bowl with no issue, Venus (the Ekkie), I can get one hand full in and any other attempts result in biting. Buddy has never hurt me, never drawn blood. I pushed him to take a bath and he bit me holding on gently but squeezing harder the longer I tried to coax him to get wet. He settled in fast, loves his cage (he's a cage potato), but loves to shower with me, not on his own and we have a great relationship. I think in Buddy's case he was so lonely since his owner was so sick (stroke victim with paralysis) and she couldn't interact with him daily on her own like they had been, he was looking for that link.

Buddy doesn't say much but I've talked to several people that know him and he has a robust vocabulary, he just doesn't share or talk. We get Hello for sure, we've gotten a wow and when my niece graduated in 2014, we were watching the graduation via a feed and he was repeating names as they called them out and they walked to receive their diplomas.

So as someone on this site said, a rescued parrot is like a treasure chest, you just have to find the right key to unlock them to find out what they know. Time and patience helps too. Buddy easily adjusted to me but I think that was a one off since he had been lonely and his basic needs met for several years. They do look for connections based on their previous relationships. The police told me that when they arrived on site that Buddy had no food or water for several days. They immediately gave him water which he took with gratification, then he took seed. His owner would share her dinner with him so he was use to real food, but towards his owner's end highly and easy processed foods like I understand he loves macaroni and cheese. I've never given him macaroni and cheese. Each bird is unique depending on their previous relationship but you can open new doors for them and strike up new relationships.
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Old 10-10-2018, 07:04 PM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

Does anyone have an price advice on adopting older birds? I’ve found a 28 year old male citron cockatoo that I’m going to meet soon. The current owner has only had him a year and says he’s been great with her but previous life is unknown. I’ve done lots of research about cockatoos before deciding to jump on this train. I’m home and have lots of available time to spend with a bird. But my question is this....if i meet Him and we click and he appears to be healthy and well mannered what is a reasonable price? I know how long they CAN live but I also know how much that can depend on diet. I don’t mind spending a lot of money on a too but I’m nervous to bring home an older one without knowing that it will be around a while still.
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Old 10-11-2018, 02:44 AM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

well a Cockatoo can easily live to their 60's and further given the proper diet and such.

One thing I will say is that she is selling him for a reason, you need to determine that reason and honestly I would not take the classic "not enough time" because everyone gives that answer and then you realize that you're dealing with a screaming biting plucking beast who thinks everything is trying to kill them. Just take your time with this guy and really dig deep on what the person currently with him does know before you decide, and really ask yourself if you're prepared to spend 40 or so years with them as they are at the point you meet them, screams and bites all included
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:51 AM
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Re: Adopting parrots in 20's

Japie is of unknown origins but I've more or less patched together his history till at least 2000, so I stick with that for administrative reasons (he could be twice that old) I do not really care.

I love older birds (in a parrot-kind-of-way, not slang); they've done the puberty-thing, they've settled and are still curious about everything and are just as capable as a youngster to learn new stuff.
Maybe not as easily impressed of molded as the babies, but who cares: you know what you've got to start with (or the bird will tell you anyway) and nobody knows where you'll be in a few years. They may surprise you at any time.



Too's are *the* most frequently rehomed parrots, because they are messy, unbelievably dusty, noisy and extremely demanding.
So go with what LordTriggs said already: find out the *real* reason this one is "up for grabs" and demand it goes through a full set of avian-disease tests before you even pick him/her up (if you can manage be there when the blood is drawn so you know it is really *that* bird being tested).
It is okay to just to pay for the tests and the extraas (cage etc.).


I cannot tell you anything about a price- they vary wildly everywhere for babies, breeders and rehomers. Some are just given away, some are being sold for twice what they are worth even in a shop.
It's a crazy planet!
(I never paid much for my rehomers- though they became costly very fast because of all the tests and meds, transportation, larger cages etc.etc. - but you know that when you adopt.
About half the babyprice for my greys -and they are cheap overhere compared to the States-, the macaw was given to me, my first grey came free as well.
)


I would never (lol, never say never!) go for one of the larger male too's because if they are hormonal- they are unbearable!

Are you prepared for the worst case scenario?
(if you are- everything will be a lot easier)

Older birds tend to be a bit more mellow than the ones just out of puberty, and not all of them are this bad - but you could just as easily face 4-5 months of continuous loud screaming and determined biting, every, single, year. (Like I said: worst case scenario)
This guy is in his prime and will be for decades to come.

So make sure you know everything about this bird before shopping (and be prepared for lies - desperate people will tell you anything... just ask the neighbours, they will definitely tell you if the bird screams a lot.)

Last edited by ChristaNL; 10-11-2018 at 04:00 AM.
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