Parrot Forum Header Left  
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Community > Senior Avians

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 10-31-2016, 08:53 PM
Rival_of_the_Rickeybird's Avatar
Supporting Member
Parrots:
None. My wife has one too many. Kidding!
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Ohio
Thanks: 3,449
Thanked 2,806 Times in 830 Posts
Rival_of_the_Rickeybird is on a distinguished road
Re: Defining a senior bird?

Parrot Purgatory. Of course. I appreciate your guidance. I have waited a long time for stewardship. Bird and wife don't really understand me.
__________________
Welcome to my world. Hey, I love my lady, my lady loves the bird, so I love the... my lady.
The story of my persecution
http://www.parrotforums.com/question...4-updates.html
Reply With Quote
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Rival_of_the_Rickeybird For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (11-01-2016), ChristaNL (09-25-2018), GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), SailBoat Supporting Member (10-31-2016), Scott  (11-01-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-31-2016, 09:09 PM
SailBoat's Avatar
Supporting Member
Parrots:
DYH Amazon
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Western, Michigan
Thanks: 36,199
Thanked 24,425 Times in 8,278 Posts
SailBoat will become famous soon enough
Re: Defining a senior bird?

Scott, very sorry for the humor spin-off of the discussion of Defining a Senior Parrot.

However, what did somewhat shine though was the reality that a Parrot with an Active Life Style will benefit, even if the Rival than suffers Parrot Purgatory.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to SailBoat For This Useful Post:
GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), Scott  (11-01-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 10-31-2016, 09:37 PM
Kentuckienne's Avatar
Supporting Vendor
Parrots:
Gus, Blue and gold macaw rescue
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Middle of nowhere (kentuckianna)
Thanks: 1,211
Thanked 3,828 Times in 1,694 Posts
Kentuckienne will become famous soon enough
Re: Defining a senior bird?

I feel uncomfortable making a relevant contribution to a thread instead of a bad pun, bad joke or bad poem.

Is the working definition of a "senior" parrot a bird whose body has begun to develop signs of degenerative changes associated with age - arthritis, bad joints, wasting of muscle mass, thinning of bone, weakening of immune system, loss of hearing and vision? Basically everything that can go wrong will go wrong. Any age bird could develop some of these symptoms age brings them all on. It sounds as if maybe the whole syndrome is happening in younger birds, perhaps because of diet and environmental factors?

I've read lots of reference articles that say the average life of a Rickeybird in the wild is 30-35 years, and in captivity they can survive to one million and thirty. But I've never ever seen any citations for those numbers. Who collected the data on how long captive parrots live? There's no central reporting agency. There's word of mouth. Birds can't tell us. People inherit birds with no idea how old they are. Are some birds living to 100+? Where is all this data on how long parrots live? Surely someone did a graduate thesis on this?

I guess what I'm wondering is ... Does it make sense to talk about parrots aging at a different rate if we don't really have the data to make reasonable assumptions about their ages in the first place?
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Kentuckienne For This Useful Post:
ChristaNL (09-25-2018), GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), Scott  (11-01-2016), Teddscau (05-19-2017), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (05-16-2018)
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2016, 08:04 AM
SailBoat's Avatar
Supporting Member
Parrots:
DYH Amazon
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Western, Michigan
Thanks: 36,199
Thanked 24,425 Times in 8,278 Posts
SailBoat will become famous soon enough
Re: Defining a senior bird?

Quote: Originally Posted by Kentuckienne View Post
I feel uncomfortable making a relevant contribution to a thread instead of a bad pun, bad joke or bad poem.

Is the working definition of a "senior" parrot a bird whose body has begun to develop signs of degenerative changes associated with age - arthritis, bad joints, wasting of muscle mass, thinning of bone, weakening of immune system, loss of hearing and vision? Basically everything that can go wrong will go wrong. Any age bird could develop some of these symptoms age brings them all on. It sounds as if maybe the whole syndrome is happening in younger birds, perhaps because of diet and environmental factors?

I've read lots of reference articles that say the average life of a Rickeybird in the wild is 30-35 years, and in captivity they can survive to one million and thirty. But I've never ever seen any citations for those numbers. Who collected the data on how long captive parrots live? There's no central reporting agency. There's word of mouth. Birds can't tell us. People inherit birds with no idea how old they are. Are some birds living to 100+? Where is all this data on how long parrots live? Surely someone did a graduate thesis on this?

I guess what I'm wondering is ... Does it make sense to talk about parrots aging at a different rate if we don't really have the data to make reasonable assumptions about their ages in the first place?
Well stated! And with a twist of humor!

The good news is that there are documented cases with older Avian Knowledgeable Vets and older Avian Vets who's clients have been with them for many Decades. In addition to, those same Vets seeing younger clients. This group of Vets have seen the transition from 'Home' made meals, to prepackaged Seed Diets, to original Pellet Diets and now to the 'natural' based Pellet Diets, and also the return to a wide and more Healthy Fresh Food Diets that have gained popularity on the Parrot Forums and other Parrot groups.

The Studies are just this year making their way to the Avian Community driven by the Avian Vets and supported /undertaken by their Educational Institutions. With the upcoming Avian Conferences in January - March 2017, the documentation will be more readily available.

Last edited by SailBoat; 11-01-2016 at 08:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to SailBoat For This Useful Post:
Anansi  (11-01-2016), GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), Kentuckienne Vendor (11-01-2016), Scott  (11-01-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2016, 09:59 AM
Scott's Avatar
Super Moderator
Parrots:
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo / RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Thanks: 74,810
Thanked 37,984 Times in 13,510 Posts
Scott is on a distinguished road
Re: Defining a senior bird?

I am going to ask my vet during Angel's next re-check to define what he considers "senior." He has mentioned cardiovascular illness affects a disproportionate number of his clients. As with humans, it can be a mix of genetics, diet, and activity level.

I love thread migrations! And especially humor! All healthy twists and turns necessary to keep the conversation alive!!
__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Scott For This Useful Post:
GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), SailBoat Supporting Member (11-01-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2016, 10:38 AM
Kiwibird's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
1 BFA- Kiwi. Hatch circa 98', forever home with us Dec. 08'
Join Date: Jul 2012
Thanks: 8,609
Thanked 16,735 Times in 6,467 Posts
Kiwibird will become famous soon enough
Re: Defining a senior bird?

I would personally probably consider a bird in the last 20-25% or so of it's expected lifespan a "senior", which would obviously vary by species. We have a fairly reasonable idea of the lifespans of most captive species these days, so it wouldn't be too difficult IMO to classify a 15 year old budgie developing arthritis as a "senior" where a 15 year old macaw is just settling down from puberty and still a "young adult". And I think a lot has to do with the individual, just like humans. We generally consider a human of 65+ years old a "senior" even though many people remain in good health and active until 80's+. Genetics, diet, lifestyle... it all plays a role.

My parents birds are all on the cusp of being "senior" birds and an interesting "case study" as single home birds with known backgrounds. The GCA and G2 were bought as unweaned babies, the DYH was bought as a mature wild caught shortly after being imported. All 3 have received the exact same care for 40+ years in the same home. The goffin is the youngest, and is in perfect health. He has so much energy, it's like he's eaten a bowl of bird crack every morning. The oldest, the DYH, has some minor arthritis in the foot she broke many years ago, but is in otherwise perfect health and still as active as ever, flying around, playing, getting into trouble. She could be well into her 50's or even 60's and we'd never know. The GCA, however, started having health issues around puberty. Lost all his head feathers (which never came back) and no vet has ever been able to offer a reason why, but he was in relatively good health until the past few years and is now really going downhill fast. He developed a cataract, had a major stroke, has had a couple suspected seizures, not growing back molted feathers and is becoming increasingly immobile from arthritis. It has long been suspected he may be a product of inbreeding, as was apparently common in the early days of captive breeding parrots. He eats the same healthy diet as the other 2 and has no deficiencies or dietary-related health issues like liver disease, was always been active until recently and has been a happy/well adjusted/loved parrot all his life. It's very sad, especially when the other 2 are so vibrant and full of life still, but gives an interesting perspective on how individual in the same environment react differently to the aging process.
__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Kiwibird For This Useful Post:
ChristaNL (09-25-2018), GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), RavensGryf Supporting Member (11-10-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2016, 11:13 AM
GaleriaGila's Avatar
Supporting Member
Parrots:
The Rickeybird, 35-year-old Patagonian Conure
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Cleveland area
Thanks: 27,007
Thanked 29,283 Times in 9,457 Posts
GaleriaGila will become famous soon enough
Re: Defining a senior bird?

Really thought-provoking.
I will look forward to reading some pf those proceedings from the convention... can we access some of those things online? Come to think of it, I believe I still have a membership in the State Library (as a former State employee) through which I can access
peer-reviewed journals, veterinary and others. Gonna check that out.
__________________
My Rickeybird
35 year old Patagonian Conure
The Artist. He chews holes -uh- designs - in cloth. I sell them in my eBay art store, Galeria Pet Portraits.
The Scrapbook. 1984-?. http://www.parrotforums.com/incredib...4-updates.html
The Star. Cinema verite! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyC...22fVRRwfLk9gwA
The Pet of the Day. Suggest one!http://petoftheday.com/archive/2016/May/20.html
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to GaleriaGila For This Useful Post:
TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2016, 11:20 AM
Kentuckienne's Avatar
Supporting Vendor
Parrots:
Gus, Blue and gold macaw rescue
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Middle of nowhere (kentuckianna)
Thanks: 1,211
Thanked 3,828 Times in 1,694 Posts
Kentuckienne will become famous soon enough
Re: Defining a senior bird?

Quote: Originally Posted by Kiwibird View Post
I would personally probably consider a bird in the last 20-25% or so of it's expected lifespan a "senior", which would obviously vary by species. We have a fairly reasonable idea of the lifespans of most captive species these days, so it wouldn't be too difficult IMO to classify a 15 year old budgie developing arthritis as a "senior" where a 15 year old macaw is just settling down from puberty and still a "young adult". And I think a lot has to do with the individual, just like humans. We generally consider a human of 65+ years old a "senior" even though many people remain in good health and active until 80's+. Genetics, diet, lifestyle... it all plays a role.

My parents birds are all on the cusp of being "senior" birds and an interesting "case study" as single home birds with known backgrounds. The GCA and G2 were bought as unweaned babies, the DYH was bought as a mature wild caught shortly after being imported. All 3 have received the exact same care for 40+ years in the same home. The goffin is the youngest, and is in perfect health. He has so much energy, it's like he's eaten a bowl of bird crack every morning. The oldest, the DYH, has some minor arthritis in the foot she broke many years ago, but is in otherwise perfect health and still as active as ever, flying around, playing, getting into trouble. She could be well into her 50's or even 60's and we'd never know. The GCA, however, started having health issues around puberty. Lost all his head feathers (which never came back) and no vet has ever been able to offer a reason why, but he was in relatively good health until the past few years and is now really going downhill fast. He developed a cataract, had a major stroke, has had a couple suspected seizures, not growing back molted feathers and is becoming increasingly immobile from arthritis. It has long been suspected he may be a product of inbreeding, as was apparently common in the early days of captive breeding parrots. He eats the same healthy diet as the other 2 and has no deficiencies or dietary-related health issues like liver disease, was always been active until recently and has been a happy/well adjusted/loved parrot all his life. It's very sad, especially when the other 2 are so vibrant and full of life still, but gives an interesting perspective on how individual in the same environment react differently to the aging process.
It almost sounds as if the GCA is developing an auto-immune disorder. I know people who suffer from these - there are many manifestations. One person was most affected first in her joints and then it began to attack soft tissues. One infant turned out to lack a gene necessary to metabolize something that then built up to toxic levels. I don't know how safe steroids are for birds, but they seem to help some people. If you pretend he's a person and put all the symptoms into WebMD or other diagnostic tool, what do you come up with?
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Kentuckienne For This Useful Post:
GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), SailBoat Supporting Member (11-01-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2016, 11:10 PM
smbrds's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Normal (or not so!) Grey Cockatiel
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Central Florida
Thanks: 477
Thanked 751 Times in 455 Posts
smbrds is on a distinguished road
Re: Defining a senior bird?

Quote: Originally Posted by GaleriaGila View Post
Good question!

I suppose there's nothing like wild natural selection to keep the gene pool good.

As you know, I've had the Rbird since he was a baby, so I have the advantage of knowing exactly how old he is.
Luckily, same here with Baby too. The worried part is the differing lifespans in many books, articles....so I just look to read and talk to those who have them and it is reassuring.

Love my little guy every day, every moment.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to smbrds For This Useful Post:
GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), Scott  (11-10-2016), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 12-05-2016, 12:59 AM
Member
Parrots:
Syd, one 65yr old Sulphur Crested Cockatoo And now Zak, 24yr old Sulphur Crested Cockatoo
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Thanks: 19
Thanked 65 Times in 19 Posts
Cindymcm is on a distinguished road
Re: Defining a senior bird?

I have a senior citizen here, 60 odd. I've never really thought of him as old but thinking about the changes in him recently, when i was in my teens 20 years ago, he was happy to climb all over my arm and play with stuff more, jump and squeak on his perch etc. He was quite mobile and happy eating food from his claw. Now days he is really very slow getting around, only eat from a dish and won't hold his food. Won't consider getting on my arm and X-rays proved he definitely has arthritis which explains why he doesn't want on my arm. He also isn't very good at preening anymore.

It is easy to not notice these things if you have had them in the family a long time but it certainly helps when you do.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Cindymcm For This Useful Post:
GaleriaGila Supporting Member (09-24-2018), TiredOldMan Supporting Member (10-30-2018)
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > Community > Senior Avians

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Senior Section smbrds Suggestions 9 10-02-2016 02:59 PM
Any Senior Pis? Piasa Pionus 11 02-01-2016 10:29 AM
I'm a Senior Member already??? Lullx Off Topic 9 03-23-2015 09:43 AM
Senior Nutri-Berries Featheredsamurai Parrot Food, Recipes and Diet 5 11-02-2013 01:11 PM
Senior GC getting cranky Robinrae Conures 2 09-09-2013 09:25 PM



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.