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Old 10-10-2019, 02:42 AM
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Re: Adding a new female Umbrella Too to my home with a Male

Umbrellas and Goffins are fairly different though (in terms of certain behaviors)---Not saying that they aren't both cockatoos, but Umbrellas seem to be a bit more prone to problematic situations in general based on stats. A pair of Umbrellas (especially male and female) is probably not going to be as smoothly-operating as a group/flock of goffins...Just based on what I have heard/read (I don't own Goffins, but I do have an Umbrella, and it seems that Goffins may be slightly less uptight about things). A pair of anything is more likely to "pair off", if you catch my drift, and if the birds form a bond, they may drift from you in some cases (especially if one is less inclined towards a particular person).

Whatever the case, your wife can't assume that she will "have her own bird" because birds pick who they pick. Luckily for her, a cockatoo can pick more than one special someone because of their flock dynamics. Why not work to strengthen the bond she's got with your current bird? I do believe that relationships with birds (especially cockatoos) can be developed, even if they don't seem too fond of someone at first.
Yes, they tend to have a single person that they are obsessed with, but they can have multiple favorite people. In the wild, they pick a mate but then they continue to hang out as a big flock (unlike most parrots). This is one of the reasons that they are so socially needy. She should work with what she's got and try to get over the idea of having "her" bird. Even if you did get another (of any species) there is no promise that it would bond to her (and even if it did, bonds often change at puberty). When I first got my bird, it picked my boyfriend over me (he didn't even like her). We are good now, but that can and does happen and not all people end up with birds who like them. Yes, they say "let the bird pick you" but at the end of the day, there is a lot up in the air here.

If you get another bird, that would mean that you would need enough time to interact with both birds out of the cage at separate times (playing, socializing etc)----If they do not get along (or get along too well...), this may mean 2 totally separate times for all of their play/social needs. That's roughly 8 hours a day at 4 hours per bird (because Umbrellas need a lot of time). Even if kept separate, hormones and aggression and jealousy can still become an issue just from them being nearby and your new bird could be a screamer etc..You have to consider the fact that your current bird sounds very mellow and a new one in the mix could totally rock that boat. Typically a well-behaved bird will modify its behavior for the worse when around a less polite bird (and not the other way around).

It sounds like she wants to experience what she thinks you have with your current bird, but each bird has its own personality and in all honesty, you guys sound like you lucked out on round one. If she gets a different one for "her" and it doesn't meet her expectations/ behave like yours, it will have defeated her purposes for getting another bird and it will have complicated what was once a good thing.

A year is not all that long, so I would also consider the fact that your current bird could still change etc. My bird has been adjusting to new things and changing for years, even as an adult (she is 11). I didn't fully know her a year after adopting her (adult re-home), even though I thought I did. Much like a child, they learn and change over time---even as adults---since the one-year adoption mark, she has formed more healthy bonds with people etc. My bird put my little sister through the ringer for that first year (tested her, bit her, bullied her). My sister finally got over her fear and learned how to call Noodles' bluff/assert herself/read body language and now they are great friends! Noodles loves her to death, which wasn't the case for the first year.

I am just afraid that because your first experience has been so good, that you may end up in way over your head (mostly due to hormones and jealousy) but also due to potential behavioral issues and personality differences between birds.

I say this lovingly, but the stereotypical umbrella cockatoo is an obsessive, fickle, flying, two-year-old with a chainsaw, the volume of a jet engine (+ wings), and ADHD tendencies---that is the stereotype for a reason....If your current bird is nothing like that, he is in the minority.

I would not risk ruining a good thing---it sounds like you guys have a great situation and this plan to add a new member could upset the balance.

Last edited by noodles123; 10-10-2019 at 05:04 AM.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2019, 07:26 AM
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Re: Adding a new female Umbrella Too to my home with a Male

Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
Umbrellas and Goffins are fairly different though (in terms of certain behaviors)---Not saying that they aren't both cockatoos, but Umbrellas seem to be a bit more prone to problematic situations in general based on stats. A pair of Umbrellas (especially male and female) is probably not going to be as smoothly-operating as a group/flock of goffins...Just based on what I have heard/read (I don't own Goffins, but I do have an Umbrella, and it seems that Goffins may be slightly less uptight about things). A pair of anything is more likely to "pair off", if you catch my drift, and if the birds form a bond, they may drift from you in some cases (especially if one is less inclined towards a particular person).

Whatever the case, your wife can't assume that she will "have her own bird" because birds pick who they pick. Luckily for her, a cockatoo can pick more than one special someone because of their flock dynamics. Why not work to strengthen the bond she's got with your current bird? I do believe that relationships with birds (especially cockatoos) can be developed, even if they don't seem too fond of someone at first.
Yes, they tend to have a single person that they are obsessed with, but they can have multiple favorite people. In the wild, they pick a mate but then they continue to hang out as a big flock (unlike most parrots). This is one of the reasons that they are so socially needy. She should work with what she's got and try to get over the idea of having "her" bird. Even if you did get another (of any species) there is no promise that it would bond to her (and even if it did, bonds often change at puberty). When I first got my bird, it picked my boyfriend over me (he didn't even like her). We are good now, but that can and does happen and not all people end up with birds who like them. Yes, they say "let the bird pick you" but at the end of the day, there is a lot up in the air here.

If you get another bird, that would mean that you would need enough time to interact with both birds out of the cage at separate times (playing, socializing etc)----If they do not get along (or get along too well...), this may mean 2 totally separate times for all of their play/social needs. That's roughly 8 hours a day at 4 hours per bird (because Umbrellas need a lot of time). Even if kept separate, hormones and aggression and jealousy can still become an issue just from them being nearby and your new bird could be a screamer etc..You have to consider the fact that your current bird sounds very mellow and a new one in the mix could totally rock that boat. Typically a well-behaved bird will modify its behavior for the worse when around a less polite bird (and not the other way around).

It sounds like she wants to experience what she thinks you have with your current bird, but each bird has its own personality and in all honesty, you guys sound like you lucked out on round one. If she gets a different one for "her" and it doesn't meet her expectations/ behave like yours, it will have defeated her purposes for getting another bird and it will have complicated what was once a good thing.

A year is not all that long, so I would also consider the fact that your current bird could still change etc. My bird has been adjusting to new things and changing for years, even as an adult (she is 11). I didn't fully know her a year after adopting her (adult re-home), even though I thought I did. Much like a child, they learn and change over time---even as adults---since the one-year adoption mark, she has formed more healthy bonds with people etc. My bird put my little sister through the ringer for that first year (tested her, bit her, bullied her). My sister finally got over her fear and learned how to call Noodles' bluff/assert herself/read body language and now they are great friends! Noodles loves her to death, which wasn't the case for the first year.

I am just afraid that because your first experience has been so good, that you may end up in way over your head (mostly due to hormones and jealousy) but also due to potential behavioral issues and personality differences between birds.

I say this lovingly, but the stereotypical umbrella cockatoo is an obsessive, fickle, flying, two-year-old with a chainsaw, the volume of a jet engine (+ wings), and ADHD tendencies---that is the stereotype for a reason....If your current bird is nothing like that, he is in the minority.

I would not risk ruining a good thing---it sounds like you guys have a great situation and this plan to add a new member could upset the balance.
Cockatoos are one of those species of birds that can form relationships with and can have multiple favorite people and other birds. Funny part is how well they adapt and act like that person. My female U2 knows people names even and call them when she see them if she want to get pick up by them and then start to minic and then talk to them. My male U2 last weekend saw his favorite lady friend he hasn't seen in a couple of weeks and was upset at her as she pick up Baby first, he started to gripe mumbling from far and then decided to fly over to her and bit her lightly, not to hard but enough to get his point across and started to yell at her with his crest up and then, he did his apology bonding clicking noise he does was fine with her.

They are very temperamental and have people like emotions and adapt to people differently based on the relationship they have with that person.

Most species of birds I say stick with one as a few that tend to prefer a person, over another and can get aggressive toward the other, but cockatoos are different and adapt faster then most birds do and love attention anywhere they can get it and adapt to many people and birds quite well.

My rescue male U2 mated to my female literally a week after introducing them, over a year later I can't separate them with them without calling to each other after a couple of minutes. Yes they get into trouble together as well and defend each other. I seen where my female as she larger can't reach to get a item she want to destroy, my male will get it and then give it to her and etc, it funny how well they work together. Yes my Little Corella cockatoo Frankie gets along with them now and get preen and etc and if he does something he not suppose to my male U2 will flock scream at him to let him know.

If you do get another bird in your flock, plan to train and spend time with the bird separate at first and have separate cages available and etc. You seem to have the time as you stated in first post, so likely would work out, just take it slow and don't force birds to get along and get the bird only if your willing to accept the fact they may not accept each other, or it take a while. My Little Corella cockatoo male Frankie, it took 3 to 4 months for my male U2 Cooper to accept him into flock and at first he would chase and fly after him to keep him away and even show wings and get larger to threaten him. Then he started doing his bonding call and accepted him one day out of the blue. Before I would have to spend time with them separately.Yes there was behavioral issues and personality differences between birds that took time to work out, so it is not easy. Now my cockatiels usually will stay on other side of where my cockatoos are and respect distance. I do keep them separate for the most part as know it take one bite from one of the larger birds. My cockatiels fly around and never attempt to get close to the larger birds and stay to themselves in their own flock.

What funny is my male U2 is way more lay back and tries to keep out of trouble for the most part, it my female U2 that crazy at times. I remember when she escape her cage while at work of course made a mess of the room, my male was still on his perch. Of course he could have when back on it, so he won't get blamed for the massive mess? They are slick and know when they did wrong as one day my female U2 chew up a wood trim, she heard me walk back upstairs and I heard her run back into her cage before I made it all they way back up the stairs. They are extremely smart. She even stay quite and pretended nothing happen, but had that guilty look about her.

Last edited by ParrotGenie; 10-10-2019 at 08:30 AM.
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2019, 11:40 AM
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Re: Adding a new female Umbrella Too to my home with a Male

Jonesy ( a goffin) and Amy (an Amazon) got along very well,but Amy likes ALL birds anyway. Like humans,birds have their own birdonality. Jonesy would fly to Amys playtop and hang out and play together or Amy would walk ( he doesn't fly) over to Jonesy crib and help himself to whatever toys or treats that where on Jonesy's roof,and at times preen eachother...but I ALWAYS watched them interact like a hawk!


Jim
__________________
Amy my beautiful Blue Front. Who was four months old when she picked me to go home with to her "forever" home in 4/1990.. DNA'd MALE in 2015
Jonesy, a cute Goffin 'too
that had to be rehomed :-(

And a Grey 'teil, BB...a.k.a. The Beebs
that was 18 weeks old 5/20/2016,






Rest in peace,my precious Smokey..4/2015 at 28 years young
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Old 10-10-2019, 02:13 PM
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Re: Adding a new female Umbrella Too to my home with a Male

Everything Noodles said is true. I have three birds and Rocky is by far the most demanding of my time and attention. Clyde and Freddie want me around, but they also will wander off to play with something or get a snack and they don't insist on being in my face 24/7. Rocky does. If he could come to work with me, he would.
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