3 Month old cockteil help

J.Y01

New member
Dec 19, 2021
3
3
Parrots
Indian Ringneck
Cockatiel
Hello, I bought a hand raised 3 month old cockatiel. This Is my first time owning a cockatiel.

It's friendly at times, it steps on my fingers but a few minutes later always flies away. I try to feed it fruits but gets aggressive and starts biting. It doesn't eat any fruits only seeds and I'm worried that it will affect its diet. It also is friendly at first and then doesn't like to be petted and keeps moving away. I understand it's still young.

What are some things I can do to make it more friendly and comfortable? Also for it to start eating fruits?

Any advice would help.

Much appreciated :)
 

LaManuka

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 29, 2018
20,798
Media
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Queensland, Australia
Parrots
Fang (11yo (ab)normal grey cockatiel), Valentino (budgie, gotcha date 14 Feb 2019 at approx 6mo), Jem (cinnamon cockatiel, little miracle bird)
Hello, I bought a hand raised 3 month old cockatiel. This Is my first time owning a cockatiel.

It's friendly at times, it steps on my fingers but a few minutes later always flies away. I try to feed it fruits but gets aggressive and starts biting. It doesn't eat any fruits only seeds and I'm worried that it will affect its diet. It also is friendly at first and then doesn't like to be petted and keeps moving away. I understand it's still young.

What are some things I can do to make it more friendly and comfortable? Also for it to start eating fruits?

Any advice would help.

Much appreciated :)

Hello J.Y01, welcome to the Forums to you and your cockatiel. Don't forget to tell us his name, will you?

Time moves much more slowly for parrots than it does for us, and you must remember that he has undergone many big changes in his short life so far. Your new bird will need some weeks or even months to become comfortable in his new surroundings, and to understand that you are not going to eat him! Little birds like cockatiels are prey animals and we look like predators to them. It takes time to earn a bird's trust and you should not force him, it's always best to allow the bird to set the pace.

The following link may give you some handy tips and tricks that may help...


I think you just need to slow down and give your birdie some space and time to settle in. With patience on your part that trust and bond between you will gradually develop. I also would not bother too much with feeding fruits, cockatiels in the wild are not big fruit eaters, and fruit is full of fructose (sugar) anyway which can cause health issues later on because they don't burn off those calories the way their wild cousins do. Much better to offer fresh vegies, fresh leafy greens like broccolini, bok choy and kale. Here's a list of parrot safe, low energy dense vegies you can feed...

*Spinach
*Celery
*Silver beet
*Broccoli
*Broccolini
*Rocket
*Pak Choy
*Bok Choy
*Capsicum
*Chilli
*Alfalfa
*Cucumber
*Brussels Sprouts
*Beetroot Leaves
*Cabbage
*Wheatgrass
*Cauliflower

Some other medium energy dense veg such as sweet potato, carrot, beetroot and squash are ok too, just fed in lower quantities.

Thank you for joining, and I wish the two of you a very long and happy life together 🙏
 
OP
J

J.Y01

New member
Dec 19, 2021
3
3
Parrots
Indian Ringneck
Cockatiel
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Hello J.Y01, welcome to the Forums to you and your cockatiel. Don't forget to tell us his name, will you?

Time moves much more slowly for parrots than it does for us, and you must remember that he has undergone many big changes in his short life so far. Your new bird will need some weeks or even months to become comfortable in his new surroundings, and to understand that you are not going to eat him! Little birds like cockatiels are prey animals and we look like predators to them. It takes time to earn a bird's trust and you should not force him, it's always best to allow the bird to set the pace.

The following link may give you some handy tips and tricks that may help...


I think you just need to slow down and give your birdie some space and time to settle in. With patience on your part that trust and bond between you will gradually develop. I also would not bother too much with feeding fruits, cockatiels in the wild are not big fruit eaters, and fruit is full of fructose (sugar) anyway which can cause health issues later on because they don't burn off those calories the way their wild cousins do. Much better to offer fresh vegies, fresh leafy greens like broccolini, bok choy and kale. Here's a list of parrot safe, low energy dense vegies you can feed...

*Spinach
*Celery
*Silver beet
*Broccoli
*Broccolini
*Rocket
*Pak Choy
*Bok Choy
*Capsicum
*Chilli
*Alfalfa
*Cucumber
*Brussels Sprouts
*Beetroot Leaves
*Cabbage
*Wheatgrass
*Cauliflower

Some other medium energy dense veg such as sweet potato, carrot, beetroot and squash are ok too, just fed in lower quantities.

Thank you for joining, and I wish the two of you a very long and happy life together 🙏
Thank you so much for your kind words and reply!

His or her name is wolfie! 😃

Yes you're 100% right! I should take it slowly especially since it's young.

In regards to feeding it vegies or food in general do you recommend to put it in the cage or let wolfie eat from my hand?

Thank you for the advice!

Much appreciated :)
 

LaManuka

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 29, 2018
20,798
Media
21
Albums
1
15,462
Queensland, Australia
Parrots
Fang (11yo (ab)normal grey cockatiel), Valentino (budgie, gotcha date 14 Feb 2019 at approx 6mo), Jem (cinnamon cockatiel, little miracle bird)
You and Wolfie are most welcome :)

Food like a good quality seed mix and/or pellets should be made available in the cage at all times. Cockatiels eat little and often throughout the day and some can become quite stressed if they think food is not available. You can clip things like bunches of broccolini or silverbeet to the inside or the outside of the cage, depending on Wolfie's level of confidence of course. If he will eat them from your hand so much the better, but they should also be left for him to nibble in his own time. Rinse and dry them well before serving to remove surface contaminants like pesticides and they can be left for pretty much most of the day provided the weather is not too hot. Wolfie may not take to them straight away - you can always prepare some for yourself and make a big show of eating and enjoying them too so that he realises it's food! Cockatiels are flock creatures and they like to be able to eat together with their flock too - and that flock is you :)

Honestly I think as long as you follow the mantra of making every interaction a positive one and not rushing things, you will be able to build a great relationship with him, it does sound to me like you are off to a pretty good start already :)

Don't forget to post some pictures when you can too...


Looking forward to seeing some pics of your little guy soon ;)
 

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