Age isn’t just a number when it comes to parrots...

PippTheBananaBirb

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Jan 7, 2022
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Budgies
Jeff(m(MIA)violet
John(m)green
Snowy(f)white
Griffen(m)yellowface sky-blue
Gertjie(f)white(joining soon)
Show budgies:
Grumpy(M, RIP)cobalt blue
Sunny(f)Light green
Cockatiel:
Pippen(?)Lutino
I hope I don't offend anyone, but this is something important I have been wanting to discuss for months:

Age and keeping parrots.

Now, you may ask, "Why is this so important?" Here's the thing:

There are way to many kids who go out and buy a bird. But there are also a lot of older adults who decide to go get a baby African grey(this is so common in South Africa, it really annoys me).

1. Children

I am in not saying it is impossible for a minor to have a parrot. I myself am a minor and own 6 small parrots(I do not plan to get any more). But, you need to think about your future.

Do you plan on moving out?
Going to university?
Getting married? Having children?

Often, you have no idea what you want to do in life. And even if you have everything planned, things don't always go your way.

Is your parents willing to pay for expensive vet bills? Do you have enough money saved to buy all the things your bird needs? Cage, food, toys, et cetera?

If you're a minor and you want a bird, please think it through. Talk to your parents/guardian beforehand.

I do worry what will happen to my birds when I move out, but I trust everything will be fine.

2. Older people

Ok, before you guys get defensive, let me explain.

I know there are a lot of older people on this forum who own birds. But here's the thing:

If you're 70, and you want to go get a parrot, just think about the possibility of you passing away and having the parrot stay behind. If you're getting an adult, then it's more unlikely. But, parrots can live very long.

So if you want to get a parrot, and the chances of you passing in the near future is very high, it is best to think about it beforehand.

If you are an older adult and you're able to take good care of your birds, good! But as said, keep in mind the life expectancy. So if you're 50, please don't get a baby parrot that will outlive you.

Again, I am not saying if you are 50+ and want a parrot, that you can't, but rather just consider the possibilities.


I hope this post will raise awareness about why your age is important in getting a parrot.
 
May 2, 2021
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Stormy(M): blue Australian budgie
Picasso(F): green Australian budgie
Apollo(F): sky blue dominant pied Australian budgie
Bump :)
Thankfully my budgies will all probably have passed away by the time I graduate collage (thankfully because I'll have time to figure some stuff out after collage before I get another bird, but I REALLY wish they lived longer).
 

SailBoat

Supporting Member
Jul 10, 2015
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Western, Michigan
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DYH Amazon
As a Senior with a DNA projection of 16 to 20 additional years ahead of me, having a Amazon in his 20's is clearly an issue and much consideration was put in place when we agreed to bring Julio into our life.

Since he is a flyer and has always been a flyer, he could live well into his late 70's. That places a huge difference and clearly states that he will out live us! But, we have handled that with a very tightly worded Will and a well funded support for the family member that has a love for and Julio enjoys being with.

Sadly, our Forum recently lost a beloved member that left behind two Parrots and they shifted nicely to a family member But it could have been very different, so you point is well made. For us, as older members, it makes real sense to have a plan in place to assure a smooth and assured transition for our Feathered Family Member(s).
 
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PippTheBananaBirb

PippTheBananaBirb

Supporting Member
Jan 7, 2022
3,206
Media
34
Albums
6
6,438
South Africa
Parrots
Budgies
Jeff(m(MIA)violet
John(m)green
Snowy(f)white
Griffen(m)yellowface sky-blue
Gertjie(f)white(joining soon)
Show budgies:
Grumpy(M, RIP)cobalt blue
Sunny(f)Light green
Cockatiel:
Pippen(?)Lutino
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #4
As a Senior with a DNA projection of 16 to 20 additional years ahead of me, having a Amazon in his 20's is clearly an issue and much consideration was put in place when we agreed to bring Julio into our life.

Since he is a flyer and has always been a flyer, he could live well into his late 70's. That places a huge difference and clearly states that he will out live us! But, we have handled that with a very tightly worded Will and a well funded support for the family member that has a love for and Julio enjoys being with.

Sadly, our Forum recently lost a beloved member that left behind two Parrots and they shifted nicely to a family member But it could have been very different, so you point is well made. For us, as older members, it makes real sense to have a plan in place to assure a smooth and assured transition for our Feathered Family Member(s).
I'm glad you are responsible and have plans for your pets, I also think Jim was aware that he may pass soon, so that's why his birds are in good hands.

It makes me really sad when people don't even consider what can happen.

I do think even if you're not old, you still need to have a plan in place for your pets. Heart attacks, car accidents, all these things can happen regardless of age. And it happens so suddenly. I do want to have a plan in place, so that if something happens to me and my family, that my pets will be ok. I would want to have my mom/younger brother care for my birds if something happens, and if they can't, I want them to go to a rescue.
 

Vampiric_Conure

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May 16, 2022
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Redshift (M)-21 yrs - Cockatiel
Charlie (M) - 22 yrs - Peach Front Conure
Well said! We have to make sure our beloved birds are taken care of when we pass. I'm in my mid 40's and have no intention of getting a bird that lives well past 30 years! My birds, if I have more and I pass away, will likely go to my local parrot club for rehoming, as none of my family are bird people.
 

Rozalka

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May 23, 2018
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Bourke's parrots, green cheeked conure, budgie
My advise - if you are a minor thinking about getting a bird and you have no idea what you're planning next... maybe it's better to not get a bird at all.
3 years ago just before starting studying I had bad time - I was literally crying because I realized that I shouldn't get any birds so early. But it was too late. I already had birbs and had to leave them with my parents because I couldn't take them with me.
 

LoveOfallAnimals

Active member
Jul 17, 2022
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Female eclectus
Honestly, I think this applies to everyone and with any animal. People of all ages die unexpectedly. It isn't anything we like to think about, but it is the truth. Before anyone gets any animal, they should take all of that into consideration. Then once you have them you should have solid plans put into a will regarding the care of your animals just like you would your children.

I think a lot of people get birds once they are older in life because that is when their life will truly accommodate the bird. I don't think any child should be allowed to get any pet that the parent isn't willing to step up and be responsible for. Children have no idea of the life changes ahead of them.
 
May 2, 2021
3,097
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4
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6,839
Vermont, USA
Parrots
Stormy(M): blue Australian budgie
Picasso(F): green Australian budgie
Apollo(F): sky blue dominant pied Australian budgie
My advise - if you are a minor thinking about getting a bird and you have no idea what you're planning next... maybe it's better to not get a bird at all.
3 years ago just before starting studying I had bad time - I was literally crying because I realized that I shouldn't get any birds so early. But it was too late. I already had birbs and had to leave them with my parents because I couldn't take them with me.
I do agree, but it was also so important for me to get birds. They helped with my social and emotional development so much, and they stopped me from
killing myself
at least 5 times. Without them, I probably wouldn't be here today, and I definitely wouldn't be HERE, on the forums!

Even so, I do understand your point. Life is just so unpredictable. So my advice to minors looking into parrots is:
If you have a solid plan for when you go to collage, uni, or any higher education, have time to care for the bird, have a quality avian vet and parents who are able to pay the expenses, have enough time to play with the bird and spend time with it, and are willing to give up a fair bit of your social life to do so, you can probably do it.

The problem is, most kids don't have all these steps. Getting a bird requires factors that may be totally out of your control! Plus the correct food toys, cage, etc. are very expensive! I wouldn't recommend that a child gets any bird with an average lifespan of 15 years or more, due to the sheer amount of life changes they will go through.
 

moxxiethecockatoo

Well-known member
Jul 20, 2022
141
281
Parrots
I have previously owned one cockatiel and two budgies. I currently own one sulphur crested cockatoo
Honestly, I think this applies to everyone and with any animal. People of all ages die unexpectedly. It isn't anything we like to think about, but it is the truth. Before anyone gets any animal, they should take all of that into consideration. Then once you have them you should have solid plans put into a will regarding the care of your animals just like you would your children.

I think a lot of people get birds once they are older in life because that is when their life will truly accommodate the bird. I don't think any child should be allowed to get any pet that the parent isn't willing to step up and be responsible for. Children have no idea of the life changes ahead of them.
I actually chose to get my cockatoo at a young age because I actually already set a plan for myself. I have everything worked out and eventually while Moxxie the cockatoo is a "pet" he will eventually be incorporated into my careers.
 

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