Alexandrine parakeet

Rowdy3303

New member
Aug 12, 2021
3
3
Florida
Parrots
Begin1
I may be adopting a female Alexandrine parakeet. She was found in a yard weeks ago. Bird rescue have tried to find her owners to no avail. They know she's an adult female but that's all.
I've fostered and cared for many types. But she will be with me forever. Can anyone offer any breed type helpful info? Anything will be amazing. As I don't see much on adult female , rescues. Thanks
 
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Rowdy3303

Rowdy3303

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Aug 12, 2021
3
3
Florida
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Betrisher

Well-known member
Jun 3, 2013
4,246
61
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Parrots
Dominic: Galah(RIP: 1981-2018); The Lovies: Four Blue Masked Lovebirds; Barney and Madge (The Beaks): Alexandrines; Miss Rosetta Stone: Little Corella
Alexandrines are lovely! Aside from that spectacular green, they're *extremely* intelligent and learn very, very quickly. If you put the time in to training your bird, she'll relish the challenges you give her and respond willingly.

One thing I know about all ring-neck species (including plum-heads, derbyans, moustaches etc) is that they can often be 'touch me not' birds. I've had mine since they were just babies, but they've never ever been comfortable with being petted or stroked or, indeed, touched in any way. Despite that, they just *love* me and never want to be separated from me, hanging out on my shoulder or wrist or on top of my head or swinging from my plait.

On the other hand, we certainly have some members whose Alexes love scritches and cuddles, so it just depends on your birdie and what her needs are. If she turns out not to enjoy being touched, just go with the flow and find out how she likes to express affection for you.

Some people are put off by that huge red bill, but honestly, no bird should ever have reason to bite a person and yours won't if you watch her carefully and take notice of the signals she gives you. Alexes use eye-pinning a *lot* and if you ask for something (eg. 'step up') and birdie flattens her feathers and pins her eyes at you (shrinks the pupils down to a pinpoint), then step away and try later. Having said that, though, the big red bill can pack a lot of force, so just be mindful of it without letting it frighten you.

Alexes are birds of the treetops, so they really adore flying. If you can give yours some opportunities to fly from room to room in your house, she'll benefit greatly from the exercise and be lots healthier because of it. This gives you the chance to do recall training too. It can be very useful indeed to have a bird that comes when it's called, especially if birdie ever gets out! Another useful thing is to teach her to fly *down* to you from a height. Many birds never learn this skill and it might matter one day if she ever did get out. My Barney got out a few years ago and sat in a tree looking desperately at me: he was unable to fly down and so instead he flew right away and was lost for over a month.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy your new Alex. Do post more photos, once she's home and settled in (might take weeks, but that's OK. There's plenty of time.) :)
 
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Rowdy3303

Rowdy3303

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Aug 12, 2021
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3
Florida
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Begin1
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Alexandrines are lovely! Aside from that spectacular green, they're *extremely* intelligent and learn very, very quickly. If you put the time in to training your bird, she'll relish the challenges you give her and respond willingly.

One thing I know about all ring-neck species (including plum-heads, derbyans, moustaches etc) is that they can often be 'touch me not' birds. I've had mine since they were just babies, but they've never ever been comfortable with being petted or stroked or, indeed, touched in any way. Despite that, they just *love* me and never want to be separated from me, hanging out on my shoulder or wrist or on top of my head or swinging from my plait.

On the other hand, we certainly have some members whose Alexes love scritches and cuddles, so it just depends on your birdie and what her needs are. If she turns out not to enjoy being touched, just go with the flow and find out how she likes to express affection for you.

Some people are put off by that huge red bill, but honestly, no bird should ever have reason to bite a person and yours won't if you watch her carefully and take notice of the signals she gives you. Alexes use eye-pinning a *lot* and if you ask for something (eg. 'step up') and birdie flattens her feathers and pins her eyes at you (shrinks the pupils down to a pinpoint), then step away and try later. Having said that, though, the big red bill can pack a lot of force, so just be mindful of it without letting it frighten you.

Alexes are birds of the treetops, so they really adore flying. If you can give yours some opportunities to fly from room to room in your house, she'll benefit greatly from the exercise and be lots healthier because of it. This gives you the chance to do recall training too. It can be very useful indeed to have a bird that comes when it's called, especially if birdie ever gets out! Another useful thing is to teach her to fly *down* to you from a height. Many birds never learn this skill and it might matter one day if she ever did get out. My Barney got out a few years ago and sat in a tree looking desperately at me: he was unable to fly down and so instead he flew right away and was lost for over a month.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy your new Alex. Do post more photos, once she's home and settled in (might take weeks, but that's OK. There's plenty of time.) :)
Thanks so much for the info. The rescue has no idea how old she is. So, I hope she bonds with me as her new friend. I want her healthy and happy. Baby steps as we figure each other out. I'm naming her Midori. Which means green in Japanese. I think it suits her. Pronounced mee door ree.
 
Last edited:

Soloist

New member
Oct 12, 2020
17
2
Alexandrines are lovely! Aside from that spectacular green, they're *extremely* intelligent and learn very, very quickly. If you put the time in to training your bird, she'll relish the challenges you give her and respond willingly.

One thing I know about all ring-neck species (including plum-heads, derbyans, moustaches etc) is that they can often be 'touch me not' birds. I've had mine since they were just babies, but they've never ever been comfortable with being petted or stroked or, indeed, touched in any way. Despite that, they just *love* me and never want to be separated from me, hanging out on my shoulder or wrist or on top of my head or swinging from my plait.

On the other hand, we certainly have some members whose Alexes love scritches and cuddles, so it just depends on your birdie and what her needs are. If she turns out not to enjoy being touched, just go with the flow and find out how she likes to express affection for you.

Some people are put off by that huge red bill, but honestly, no bird should ever have reason to bite a person and yours won't if you watch her carefully and take notice of the signals she gives you. Alexes use eye-pinning a *lot* and if you ask for something (eg. 'step up') and birdie flattens her feathers and pins her eyes at you (shrinks the pupils down to a pinpoint), then step away and try later. Having said that, though, the big red bill can pack a lot of force, so just be mindful of it without letting it frighten you.

Alexes are birds of the treetops, so they really adore flying. If you can give yours some opportunities to fly from room to room in your house, she'll benefit greatly from the exercise and be lots healthier because of it. This gives you the chance to do recall training too. It can be very useful indeed to have a bird that comes when it's called, especially if birdie ever gets out! Another useful thing is to teach her to fly *down* to you from a height. Many birds never learn this skill and it might matter one day if she ever did get out. My Barney got out a few years ago and sat in a tree looking desperately at me: he was unable to fly down and so instead he flew right away and was lost for over a month.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy your new Alex. Do post more photos, once she's home and settled in (might take weeks, but that's OK. There's plenty of time.) :)
Also to add to this, Alexandrines are very curious birds by nature, which may give you a fall sense of trust. Until you get to know your bird, please always keep a look out to their body language, as it is a very telling sign as Betrisher eluded to. But more telling are their pupils, when they are dilated, it means they are intrigued and stimulated...as I said be careful as sometimes this dilated can mean stimulated to attack or times it can mean stimulated like curious because you are new to her.

The great thing about Alexandrines, that I love is their curious nature, they don't normally sit still on a perch, they like to go search their surroundings. Moreover, you will need to supply your bird with plenty of chew toys. Alexandrines, are destructive by nature and like to chew so it is very vital you provide a lot of chew toys, for some this destruction turns people of but for me I find it very fascinating, I love to see nature at it's best and see a parrot chew things and not just on a perch and not do anything. With regards to their physical look, you have said that it is an adult female, so Alexandrines are sexually dimorphic, meaning you can tell a male from a female because the males by the age of 2 should have a fully black ring around their neck, while a female does not, as well the male will have a tail length close to 24 inches while a female will be 12-15 if my memory is correct.

But yes, I don't know how well you are versed with keeping parrots, and are brave enough to let this bird roam and fly freely for couple of hours but you will find they are majestic in flight especially with their long tails. I do hope you develop a great bond with the bird. You can always, start of with treat training and possibly get a clicker. But remember training a parrot is all about learning their behaviour and you adapting to their body language into tricking a desire behaviour, whether it be stepping up to your hand or flying to you on command. Good luck.
 

Charliesmom

New member
Apr 4, 2019
27
1
Minnesota
Parrots
Cinnamon green cheek conure
Sunday conure
African grey
Cockatiel
Ciaque
Senegal
Blue crown conure
Hahns macaw
Alexan
Mine is pretty much as described above. I have a female. I have many birds and she is by far my biggest chewer. Chews everything, even things she's not supposed to. Just put a new thermostat on the wall Haha.
She doesn't like to be touched either. But she loves attention! She loves to be talked to and near me and loves to do my hair. But me touching her...... no. But that's ok, all birds are different and that's just her personality and we still have a great relationship.
 

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