Amazon body language

MykaMom

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Aug 24, 2019
14
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Illinois
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Yellow Nape Amazon
Chickens
When my parrot is doing the Line Dance of Death, he is generally chasing my adult daughter around the house. It's a SMALL house. Redirecting doesn't work: I've started grounding him(closing him in his rarely ever closed cage) after the third chase. Any suggestions? I know he's frustrated with her refusal to hold him, truthfully she is afraid of his bite.

This behavior started in the spring when he started his 'I'm 10, you're my mate and she is boy's behavior. Will he outgrow this in a year or so?
 

SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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DYH Amazon
Commonly, Amazons experience their first chemical rush at a much earlier age (between 3 and 6 years).

Please take the time to read this Thread to expand your understanding of Amazon Body Language - I reread it regularly!
The length of time this behavior is extending implies that it could have several drivers beyond natural 'season.' A couple of examples: Diet (sugar, both added and natural), sleep (lack of), handling (in areas that excite), etc...
Redirecting, can differ between Parrots. What works with one only excites another. My best luck has come with the dancing bath towel place between the Amazon and the target. Keeping its actions busiest near the floor. The towel should never leave the floor -- when that happens, they see the target.
Will he out-grow this? Once the drivers are determined and either reduced or eliminated it will reduce. We have a DYH Amazon, which we keep his sleep schedule very near the Sun Schedule, which helps greatly during the bulk of the year. The Winter to Spring can be a nightmare.
Look for the drivers (triggers) and work to limit them.
 

TrebleMama

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Nov 22, 2019
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Michigan
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Treble-Red-Headed Amazon
Well we saw Defcon 3 last yesterday, exactly how the OP explained it! The whole day had been very chaotic with people in and out, my nerves were getting frayed after dealing with having to do a bunch of store errands the week of Thanksgiving (they were madhouses!), and even when Treble was in his cage he was able to see all the commotion, (in hindsight I should have closed the doors to the room but I'm still very much a parrot newbie and didn't even think of it).

By late afternoon I was agitated, one of my kids was having a complete meltdown and crying/whining etc. And then I very stupidly decided to take Treble out of the cage-DUMB DUMB DUMB!! After stepping on my finger he bit me for the first time, hard, which of course caused me to freak out, since I'm still intimidated by his size, so I quickly put him on the top of his cage and that's when Defcon 3 happened, it was quite spectacular to watch :p I sent all the kids to their rooms, because they needed to decompress as much as he did, and I took a shower and had a large cup of coffee to settle myself down. The mood in the house finally calmed down and by last night he was back to normal and contentedly playing with my husband and his toys. Lesson learned-do NOT overstimulate the baby LOL :green1: I tried to have him step on my finger again last night but I was still shaken up and he wasn't cooperating so I backed off and gave myself some time to regain my confidence. This morning I knew I had to 'get back on the horse' so to speak so I made sure I was the first person to interact with him and take him out of his cage. He stepped up no problem, whew!
 
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SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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DYH Amazon
The truly wonderful thing with the vast majority of Amazons is they provide clear indications that they are spinning-up!

The Greatest Mistake Humans Make is not checking the emotional state of their Amazon prior to entering the Amazon's space. Or, to even let them know that you are entering!

You so well covered the importance of keep an eye on what is happening around an Amazon. They, like Humans are easily effected by the emotions of the Holidays and Holiday company.

Dealing with Defcon 3 is much easier to deal with when you see it building.
 
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OP
Birdman666

Birdman666

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Sep 18, 2013
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San Antonio, TX
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Presently have six Greenwing Macaw (17 yo), Red Fronted Macaw (12 yo), Red Lored Amazon (17 y.o.), Lilac Crowned Amazon (about 43 y.o.) and a Congo African Grey (11 y.o.)
Panama Amazon (1 Y.O.)
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Bite pressure training also helps considerably... though if they get too amped up that does tend to go out the window.

I need to post some Kiwi and Sally play videos... those myths about YOU SHOULDN'T EVER... will be BUSTED!
 

scozmos

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Jul 27, 2020
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Alfie - a 14 yr old male Red Lored Amazon via rescue
I've been asked to contribute my take on amazon body language. So here it is. This is by no means an exhaustive list. If anyone thinks of things I've left out, and I'm sure there is, feel free to add to this.

Amazons more than any other parrot use body language to communicate. You can usually tell just by looking at them what they are going to do before they do it. People call them “moody” but it’s more like they are 100% honest about their feelings, and they can be rather “opinionated” at times. Sometimes that means, “Sorry, I’m just not interested right now.” When they tell you something like that, especially if they continue to tell you that, and you ignore it, then don't be surprised if they bite.

Leaning forward, wings quivering I am in launch mode. Pick me up NOW, or I’ll come to you.

Alfie has now owned me for almost a year and boy, do I know it! The quote above is constant, pick me up now! He'll launch himself towards my shoulder at every opportunity, often just as I'm leaving the room so, I have to be quick and careful.

If, for some bizarre reason, I somehow slip out without him noticing, the entire neighbourhood finds out! :green1: Mr Grumpy starts with an incessant call, which then progresses to I'm bloody angry now so get here quick!

All that said, if he gets half an hour on my shoulder, or in my vicinity every morning, he's reasonably happy from then on but....... trying watching TV when he's out! Pay attention to ME!!!!!

We're learning together. The only real shame is, his previous owner had such a deep voice, we're convinced he is speaking but haven't a clue what he's trying to say.
 
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wrench13

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Nov 22, 2015
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Yellow Shoulder Amazon, Salty
Try reading about contact calls in the Amazon sub forum. Especially if he calls to you when you leave the room. My 'zon Salty has a specific call he utters when I leave the room, and if I answer it with my usual response back to him "I'm here, where are you?" he is fine until I come back in. Use that call when you'll be out for a bit but will soon return. Also, try to let Alfie know if you will go out and will not return for a longer period, like work or the store. Again, use a specific phrase "I will see you soon, Alfie" . If you do that religiously, he will learn that even tho you are going out, you will be back, and he will stress less. They really are like little children, that need to be reassured that your presence will be forthcoming.
 

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