Anyone growing food for their birbs?

ChrisH123

Member
Mar 3, 2022
20
56
Parrots
Rose Breasted Cockatoo
Meyers Parrot
Every month I try to offer ONE new thing that my birds have never had (which usually means neither have I).

This month I went a little over the top and started growing MANY new things for them. Long story short I accidentally bought a 72 cell seed starter instead of a 36.
😬


So, crossing my fingers a bit that this experiment will turn out. LOL I'm super excited to offer the CHICORY (all parts) and BORAGE (flowers).

(Disclaimer: The eggplant and chives are for the hoomans).
20220322_102739.jpg
 

HeatherG

Well-known member
Apr 25, 2020
1,396
2,081
I am trying to decide whether to garden this summer. I haven’t made up my mind yet. I am wondering if I would be better off to buy my veggies and concentrate on using gardening time for exercise. Maybe I would still plant some tomatoes or nasturtiums for birds.
 

zERo

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2021
300
454
Texas
Parrots
Tony-Green QP(M)
Tom-Pineapple GCC(M)
Ryuk-Cockatiel(M)
Sheer Khan-Cockatiel(F)
Romeo-Cockatiel(M)
Billy- Green budgie(M)
Hedwig- Green budgie(F)
Striga- Blue Clearwing budgie(M)
Grim- Mauve budgie(F)
I grow strawberries and kale so far for them. Once I move I hope to grow more, when I have more room and hopefully a greenhouse.
 

chris-md

Supporting Member
Feb 6, 2010
4,204
1,519
Maryland - USA
Parrots
Parker - male Eclectus

Aphrodite - red throated conure (RIP)
I’ve got artichoke (dying I think), celery, and peppers growing for Parker. Eventually Swiss chard will be added.
 

PippTheBananaBirb

Supporting Member
Jan 7, 2022
2,544
Media
34
Albums
6
3,362
South Africa
Parrots
Budgies
Jeff(m)violet spangle(MIA)
John(m)green
Snowy(f)DF spangle
Griffen(m)yellowface sky-blue spangle
show budgies:
Grumpy(M)(RIP)cobalt blue
Sunny(f)Light green opaline
Cockatiel:
Pippen(?)Lutino
I am planting spring onion(human food), spinach(for the humans and birbs), beetroot(birds+humans), and peas(humans+birds).

Will share pics later :)
 

HeatherG

Well-known member
Apr 25, 2020
1,396
2,081
I bought some little garden plants and will plant them in a raised bed this weekend. Kale, tomatoes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cukes, acorn squash, and pattypan squash.

I need to find some herbs at a reasonable price as they were really high at the plant store.

I hope the raised bed makes gardening more possible for me! I couldn’t till the 10’ x 10’ plot by myself.
 
Last edited:

PippTheBananaBirb

Supporting Member
Jan 7, 2022
2,544
Media
34
Albums
6
3,362
South Africa
Parrots
Budgies
Jeff(m)violet spangle(MIA)
John(m)green
Snowy(f)DF spangle
Griffen(m)yellowface sky-blue spangle
show budgies:
Grumpy(M)(RIP)cobalt blue
Sunny(f)Light green opaline
Cockatiel:
Pippen(?)Lutino
I bought some little garden plants and will plant them in a raised bed this weekend.
That sounds so cool! I'd love to see some pics!
I need to find some herbs at a reasonable price as they were really high at the plant store.
Yep, they sure can be expensive! He good thing is, once you plant them you can continue harvesting the seed and planting more each year, for free! No more buying from the store(that's my goal... lol)
I hope the raised bed makes gardening more possible for me! I couldn’t till the 10’ x 10’ plot by myself.
Surprisingly, tilling/ploughing the soil is not necessary and can even damage the soil.

First, tilling soil can harm beneficial microorganisms, because it moves oxygen rich soil downwards where the carbon thriving organisms live and the carbon rich soil upwards where the oxygen thriving organisms live, and you can guess what happens. It's just not natural either, I mean, do you see mixing of the soil happening in the wild? I certainly don't.

Second, it can cause what's known as a ploughing pan/barrier, especially if you frequently plow your soil.

Third, if you're doing it to stop weed growth, just use mulch! Mulch is a must in gardens. I have it in my planters as well as raised bed. Mulch suppresses weed growth, preserves moisture, and gives nutrients to the soil(if you're using organic mulch(mulch made from previously living materials, example: dry grass, leaves, wood pieces etc.)

I know, it's shocking, I thought it's the ideal thing to do but no. It's best to just gently fracture the soil to soften it for planting.

As for the original point, yes raised beds can be easier for some people. I have a raised bed and a LOT of planters, some not being used yet.

Ok, Sorry OP that I went a bit off-topic, I just wanted to say that for any people who want to plant crops someday!
 
Last edited:

Most Reactions

Latest posts

Top