Baby-Making Considerations for Oblivious Owner

TippiBird

New member
Jun 22, 2017
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Hi guys! I'm in need of some help.
I've had my female 14 y/o Congo for 13 years, but I think she could be happier if she were not in an indoor cage and got more attention (I live in a coop so she lives with my parents). Someone coming over to do house repairs saw her and said he has been looking for a mate for his 20 y/o male Grey, who lives in a large outdoor area that I am welcome to examine. They would have chicks and he plans to keep them all and basically have a parrot family. I have zero knowledge on this subject.

a) Would they keep reproducing until they weren't mating age anymore, meaning there would be an endless stream of babies?
b) Is there a possibility the babies would reproduce with each other?
c) What are the chances that my Grey and his will actually like each other, and how will I know? I know some birds just don't get along well, is there a chance my Grey could get hurt?
d) Anything else I should know?
 

SailBoat

Supporting Member
Jul 10, 2015
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DYH Amazon
And, we are all going to live happily ever-after in a big Parrot family!

That individual likely has no more experience than you do!

Just Say No! and keep saying NO!
 

Inger

Well-known member
Mar 20, 2017
3,299
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Everett, WA
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Bumble - Pacific (or Celestial) Parrotlet hatched 02/19/17
Good on you for asking questions. I'm with Mr. Boats.


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SilverSage

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Sep 14, 2013
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Eclectus, CAG, BH Pionus, Maximilian’s Pionus, Quakers, Indian Ringnecks, Green Cheeked Conures, Black Capped Conures, Cockatiels, Lovebirds, Budgies, Canaries, Diamond Doves, Zebra Finches, Society F
Please do not. As a breeder myself I am obviously not against breeding when you do it RIGHT!

And doing it right takes hundreds of hours of research, extremely expensive equipment, at least one person able to stay home around the clock, a huge veterinary budgies, and BABIES WILL DIE. Not they MIGHT die, they WILL die from all sorts of things that never occurred to you until you had a baby die from it.

And yes the babies would try to inbreed with each other.

And yes the process of breeding will be so hard on your bird that it could kill her if you don't do everything right.

And yes the male will likely kill her right off if you put her in his cage.

This is not a solution. Please if you truly think your bird wants to live outside, buy her a second cage so she can spend time outside safely. No need to produce a mass flock of parrots who will likely not thrive in order to get her an outside space.


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SilverSage

New member
Sep 14, 2013
5,937
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Columbus, GA
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Eclectus, CAG, BH Pionus, Maximilian’s Pionus, Quakers, Indian Ringnecks, Green Cheeked Conures, Black Capped Conures, Cockatiels, Lovebirds, Budgies, Canaries, Diamond Doves, Zebra Finches, Society F
Huge veterinary BUDGET. I'm now envisioning a giant budgie in scrubs examining pets.


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Anansi

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Dec 18, 2013
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Hello, and welcome to the Parrot Forums family! I agree with the above advice. breeding is a heavy undertaking that needs to be done with a lot of planning and research done beforehand.

Not to mention that the dangers to your bird would be real. Aside from the possibility of the two not getting along and something happening between them in the outside aviary while no one is around to intercede, there is also the possibility of disease. Any bird that you allow to come into contact with your own should be one that you are confident has never been exposed to disease. It doesn't sound like you know this guy or his grey very well.

And btw, what exactly are you looking to do in this instance? Re-home your grey to him? Or just periodically loan her out for baby-making excursions?

Huge veterinary BUDGET. I'm now envisioning a giant budgie in scrubs examining pets.

Hilarious imagery!!!
 

Lacewing

New member
Feb 16, 2017
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USA
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Murphy Jr. English Budgie
Saw this same post on another forum. You should get good advice.
 

LordTriggs

New member
May 11, 2017
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Surrey, UK
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Rio (Yellow sided conure) sadly no longer with us
in short no. That person is either going to be selling babies or they're going to end up with lots of inbreeding. Yes they will breed constantly given the right conditions until one of them died

Like everyone else has said it's a huge strain and could kill your bird, they may not get on and they may get sick easily.

Also a person randomly approaching you and asking I would be super wary. I would only let any bird I own to go to a legitimate rescue if it wasn't able to stay with me.

Really it is your parent's bird now. You should focus on finding a larger home to live in where your grey can live with you if you feel there isn't enough interaction
 

plumsmum2005

New member
Nov 18, 2015
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England, UK
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Lou, Ruby, and Sonu.
Fly free Plum, my gorgeous boy.
Loads of good comments and advice previously but you do not know this male birds history is he fit and well? Has he shown any aggression previously, the current relationship with her could alter dramatically as a result of her mating.

An outdoor aviary would be something to put on a wish list, babies no.

There could be ownership issues some way down the line also. Would not go there!
 
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Kiwibird

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2012
9,538
60
Parrots
1 BFA- Kiwi. Hatch circa 98', forever home with us Dec. 08'
My first thought upon hearing this "big parrot family" concept is more likely "sell the babies and not cut you in on the profits". Trust is earned, not implicit and I wouldn't trust a complete stranger who wanted to take my bird to use as a baby maker. Seriously.

It's a good thing you asked. You're answer should be a firm and final "no thanks". If you feel your bird is unhappy in her current situation, then you either need to make a plan to move somewhere you can have her or find her a home where someone wants to love and work with her as a pet and has the time/accommodations for her, not someone who wants to breed her. Pet parrots make poor breeders, breeder birds make poor pets. There isn't really a (no pun intended) gray area there. Your bird has lived her life as a pet and will likely do best continuing in that role, be it with you or your parents or someone else who has the *right* intentions.
 
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