Buying one ekkie... should I get another?

reddfoxx79

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Mar 4, 2021
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Houston
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Fennel, Solomon Eclectus female (12/25/20)..... Lulu, Solomon Eclectus female (10/1/20)..... Vegas, Harlequin macaw (2/2/21)
Hi. I'm new here. My daughter has an apartment attached to our house. She's getting an ekkie in a couple weeks, who is a 12-week-old female, almost weaned. The ekkie screams and acts a little bratty, she's super cute, and I attribute her orneriness to her just being a baby bird. At the store, she shares an aviary wall with a 20-week-old female ekkie, and they play through the glass and look for each other throughout the day. The older ekkie had a brother with her until a couple weeks ago, and the people who raised her said she's definitely acting more subdued since he left. While the younger one plays a lot in her cage, the older one just sits. I held her today for the first time, and after a few minutes, she started playing, tried to vocalize, and perched on my shoulder with one foot up. It seems to me that she needs a home, and people, and attention.

The older ekkie is sweet, doesn't scream, likes to be out and about, and isn't a huge fan of petting (which I read on here is okay). She's the kind of bird (they said) who wants to be around you without being in your face all the time. I think it would be a good idea to get both females.

The younger one would live in my daughter's apartment and the older one would live in my home office. We would like to take them to the outside aviary periodically in the yard for sunshine and playtime together. Now, we are new bird owners as far as these parrots go. I've had finches (I have two now), parakeets, canaries, and cockatiels. I know this is a whole different ballgame.

The people at the store who hand raised both birds said they would love if the ekkies could go to the same house, and it would be good for both of them in regards to their socialization and overall development. Is this true? What do you bird experts think? Thanks so much!
 

SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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You may not be aware of the reality that your daughter has selected one of the most demanding Parrots regarding its highly specialized diet requirements. In addition. Your 'home' maybe better severed by only bringing the older of the two home as in a few years, your daughter may likely be onto other things and you find yourself with two Parrots.

Not that would happen in your home, but sadly it does far more often than not!

Never bring a baby home until it has been on solid food for at least two weeks, preferable a bit longer.
 

noodles123

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Jul 11, 2018
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Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I would stick with one (personally)..at least until your baby is grown up. If you bring a new bird home, you should always quarantine it for 45 days unless it was already sharing a cage with your other bird.
One is going to need at least 3-4 hours out daily-- if you get another and they don't get along or get along too well (mating etc) then you would have to let them out separately (for a total of 6-8 hours at 3-4 hours each).
The cost of one is extremely high as well in terms of vet care etc.

I'm not saying you can never have more than one- just saying I think that you should get through puberty before assuming anything (not everyone is going to agree with me on that though).


Make sure that the bird is 100% weaned for a few weeks before you take him home. Getting an unweaned baby doesn't improve the bonding process (despite the common misconception that it does). It was likely perpetuated by breeders who have substantially less work hand-feeding if they sell unweaned ones who require feedings etc.


Babies change a lot at puberty and at sexual maturity, so when you get a baby, it is really hard to know what it will be like as an adult, so if you do get 2, age will impact the dynamics (which could easily change at puberty).
 
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reddfoxx79

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Mar 4, 2021
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Houston
Parrots
Fennel, Solomon Eclectus female (12/25/20)..... Lulu, Solomon Eclectus female (10/1/20)..... Vegas, Harlequin macaw (2/2/21)
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Thanks for the info. I absolutely want to be sure she's weaned before bringing her home.
 

ALRAINBOW

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Mar 27, 2020
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i bought a pair as i figured companionship when im not home . now having said this one poster said at some point i may need to bage them alone and far away from each other . so far there a happy couple
 
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reddfoxx79

New member
Mar 4, 2021
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Houston
Parrots
Fennel, Solomon Eclectus female (12/25/20)..... Lulu, Solomon Eclectus female (10/1/20)..... Vegas, Harlequin macaw (2/2/21)
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ALRAINBOW - I see so much conflicting information out there. Every bird and situation is different. If your birds get along without any problems, I don't see any reason to assume that will change in the future. It might or it might not. Cross that bridge when you come to it. For now, let them be happy together. I'm no expert, but sometimes observation trumps advice.
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
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163
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Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
ALRAINBOW - I see so much conflicting information out there. Every bird and situation is different. If your birds get along without any problems, I don't see any reason to assume that will change in the future. It might or it might not. Cross that bridge when you come to it. For now, let them be happy together. I'm no expert, but sometimes observation trumps advice.




What I am saying had nothing to do with ALRAINBOW' (it's just a reply to a reply by reddfoxx70)
This issue is that observation of 2 babies (pre maturity) will be very different from at adulthood--- just like a baby boy and a baby girl...They can take baths together and hang out as babies, but when they grow up, that changes. If they get very attached and try to mate, separating them can cause further trauma/emotional turmoil, so it's more about trying to set them up for success and there are pros and cons to either side, but I wouldn't say that observation should be the starting point- I'd start with facts and then decide if the risk is worth it.


If a bird can be okay by him/herself with enough flock support, having 1 can reduce the risks of behavioral problems with regard to mating and fighting etc. Getting 2 birds that live together and then are forced to separate can be very hard on everyone.
 
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