Disgusted by the exhibiting process of show budgies

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reeb

reeb

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I grew-up in a family where both my grandmother and my mother both bred English and American Budgies, and hybrids of the two, and hand-raised all of the chicks themselves from 2 weeks old forward, not for shows but as pets for local residents in my hometown, and for the local pet shop at the time to sell. My mom also got into cockatiels and conures, and now she's breeding and raising game birds like chicken, ducks, quail, chukkars, doves, pigeons, etc. I bred both English and American Budgies for a bit over 20 years and hand-raised them as pets only, and I actually had an agreement with another local pet shop in my hometown about 20 minutes from where I live now, as they were only able to find parent-raised babies and were thrilled to take my tame birds to sell as pets...

As such, I was exposed to a few of these Budgie "shows", and bird shows in-general, and I too was absolutely horrified, first at seeing the birds in their little cages at the shows, all of them horrified, scared to move, scared to make a sound, like statues, and then even more after talking to a few of the show-breeders and listening to how they PURPOSELY MAKE THEIR BIRDS INTO LIVING STATUES THAT LOOK A CERTAIN WAY.

And that's exactly what they do, they spend all of their "training" time, and that description is a bunch of BS, literally scaring the Budgies into submission , so that they essentially create a bunch of living bird statues that will not more, will not make any sounds, they simply sit in their tiny cages and when shown the "stick" that they are terrified of, they step-up onto it and then freeze...

I was told by many of these show breeders that they actually hit their birds with perches, hold them under water, make them stay in total darkness in a little, tiny box for 24 hours at a time, etc. AND THE THINGS THEY DO TO THEM TO MAKE THEM LOOK A CERTAIN WAY IS ABSOLUTELY HORRENDOUS AND IS ANIMAL NEGLECT AND ABUSE...They either stop feeding them for weeks at a time if they are too large, or they force-feed them tons and tons of high-fat baby bird formula several times a day, of course by Tube-Feeding them when they aren't hungry if they are too small. They are constantly pulling their feather out, including flight feather and blood feathers that are implanted in their bones, with pliers, to make them look a certain way. They pull out feathers on their faces and heads with tweezers and needle-nose pliers to get rid of unwanted spotting, or to influence spots to grow in a certain place. They rip out toenails completely and then immerse the quick in liquid sulfur to stop the bleeding (same with the blood feathers they pull) in order to start the toenails growing over from scratch so that they can control the growth. I could go on and on, as they do things to their eyes as well, but I won't...

It reminds me of a show-gardener or prize rose grower, trimming and pruning their plants/flowers to shape them and make them look a certain way, tying them to stakes to make them grow a certain way, and feeding them chemicals and such to influence their colors, size, etc. That's what these show-bird breeders do. And it's not just Budgies, it's all birds that are shown...

Worse than the way show Budgies and other parrots are treated is the way show game foul is treated, specifically show chickens, ducks, and geese. They do things to them that most people wouldn't wish upon their worst enemy. It's disgustingly awful..

These are living creatures that are extremely intelligent and have very sensitive feelings, and this is how they are treated, like prize flowers that are grown and shaped a certain way in order to win ribbons and money.

It's absolutely horrific :( I could never even imagine my budgies going through this kind of stuff.
 

Cardinal

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Currently I have none, but I have the capacity to adopt a minimum and maximum of two budgies - preferably a bonded pair or two males.
As such, I was exposed to a few of these Budgie "shows", and bird shows in-general, and I too was absolutely horrified, first at seeing the birds in their little cages at the shows, all of them horrified, scared to move, scared to make a sound, like statues, and then even more after talking to a few of the show-breeders and listening to how they PURPOSELY MAKE THEIR BIRDS INTO LIVING STATUES THAT LOOK A CERTAIN WAY.

I was told by many of these show breeders that they actually hit their birds with perches, hold them under water, make them stay in total darkness in a little, tiny box for 24 hours at a time, etc. AND THE THINGS THEY DO TO THEM TO MAKE THEM LOOK A CERTAIN WAY IS ABSOLUTELY HORRENDOUS AND IS ANIMAL NEGLECT AND ABUSE...

Worse than the way show Budgies and other parrots are treated is the way show game foul is treated, specifically show chickens, ducks, and geese. They do things to them that most people wouldn't wish upon their worst enemy. It's disgustingly awful..

These are living creatures that are extremely intelligent and have very sensitive feelings, and this is how they are treated, like prize flowers that are grown and shaped a certain way in order to win ribbons and money.



Hi Ellen

Thanks for sharing this. I totally agree with you. I saw the documentary Chicken people about the fancy chicken hobby and the people who raise them and show them. It did not seem cruel to me. Actually I felt that it is far better than how chickens would typically be treated in a factory farm- either for eggs or meat.

Agree with you entirely on the budgies though; hope you enjoyed reading Helen's website.

cheers :greenyellow::greenyellow::greenyellow:

Avin
 

caiquewalk

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I went to a bird show here in Sydney. The name of the show i wont disclose because i will probably get into throuble.

At first the thought of a bird show excited me, but after witnessing and being told that the birds had to sit in a small cramped boxes with no food or water whole day. These birds were not allowed to move. The lady i spoke to who owned the majority of the parrots seemed like she had no love at all for her birds. Sad Sad sad.
 

EllenD

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Ellen, what a sad commentary on the human species. :(


I know...and to think that hundreds of thousands of bird owners do this all across the world, every single day...

But then again, think about what humans do every single day TO EACH OTHER...
 

EllenD

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As such, I was exposed to a few of these Budgie "shows", and bird shows in-general, and I too was absolutely horrified, first at seeing the birds in their little cages at the shows, all of them horrified, scared to move, scared to make a sound, like statues, and then even more after talking to a few of the show-breeders and listening to how they PURPOSELY MAKE THEIR BIRDS INTO LIVING STATUES THAT LOOK A CERTAIN WAY.

I was told by many of these show breeders that they actually hit their birds with perches, hold them under water, make them stay in total darkness in a little, tiny box for 24 hours at a time, etc. AND THE THINGS THEY DO TO THEM TO MAKE THEM LOOK A CERTAIN WAY IS ABSOLUTELY HORRENDOUS AND IS ANIMAL NEGLECT AND ABUSE...

Worse than the way show Budgies and other parrots are treated is the way show game foul is treated, specifically show chickens, ducks, and geese. They do things to them that most people wouldn't wish upon their worst enemy. It's disgustingly awful..

These are living creatures that are extremely intelligent and have very sensitive feelings, and this is how they are treated, like prize flowers that are grown and shaped a certain way in order to win ribbons and money.



Hi Ellen

Thanks for sharing this. I totally agree with you. I saw the documentary Chicken people about the fancy chicken hobby and the people who raise them and show them. It did not seem cruel to me. Actually I felt that it is far better than how chickens would typically be treated in a factory farm- either for eggs or meat.

Agree with you entirely on the budgies though; hope you enjoyed reading Helen's website.

cheers :greenyellow::greenyellow::greenyellow:

Avin

I'm not familiar with that documentary, but maybe that was showing the good-side of showing chickens, because my mother knows a few people who show chickens, ducks, geese, quail, doves, pigeons, grouse, etc., and the reason I didn't go into what is done to them is because I don't even want to type it out...

You're correct about how birds raised to be food are treated, however that has gotten much, much, much better and really is monitored extremely closely, ONLY BECAUSE THE FDA STEPPED-IN. That being said, this applies only to the very large poultry farms that sell to the huge food companies, or who are owned by the huge food companies. The abuse of chickens and turkeys that are going to be food at small, private farms all over the country is still horrible...

I'll give you one example of a person that I know-of who raises show chickens from the moment they hatch. Now keep in-mind that this person takes the very best of care of her breeder chickens who are creating the show chickens for her, as they are retired show chickens that cost her thousands of dollars. They live inside her house, are pampered, fed the very best diets, etc. However, the poor chicks that are destined to be money-winning show-chickens start being tortured from the moment they hatch...The one thing that hit me very hard as far as the things she does is that because she wants their feathers to look a certain way, she waits until all of their feather come in for the first time, and then she plucks every single one of them! Then she puts the young chicken in a tiny little brooder for heat, and as feathers start coming back in, she applies things to them like chemical, ointments, creams, etc., she ties them, clips each feather individually, she preens the poor things herself to her liking....she also dyes their feathers the same color the bird already is, as to make their natural color brighter...it's terrible. Every day these birds are simply picked-at and tortured all day long. And the biggest source of torture is the way that they are fed...

I'll simply state that if a bird, a dog, a cat, a reptile, etc. hits physical maturity and is full-grown, and they are healthy and happy, they are eating a nutritious, varied diet, and their over-all body size is smaller or larger than what you wish it to be for the purpose of showing to win money, THAT DOESN'T MEAN THAT YOU SHOULD DO THINGS TO THE POOR ANIMAL TO CHANGE IT'S NATURAL BODY SIZE...uhg...
 

marrmarr

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I'm not here to judge anyone but most of the people who put people/animals into exhibition usually have low self esteem and push that onto another living being. become obsessed with what they wish they could be, "perfect". I read this thread while I watched my budgie fly around the living room playing and almost teared up. consumerist brainwashing and disunion of the ego within these bird owners is to blame. kids, dogs, cats, birds, even fishes all have feelings and the similarities between all is often forgotten.
 

Cardinal

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Currently I have none, but I have the capacity to adopt a minimum and maximum of two budgies - preferably a bonded pair or two males.
This is the trailer of the Documentary I was referring to. It is there on Amazon Prime.

[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9ZShxa6wJ0"]Chicken People Official Trailer 1 (2016) - Documentary - YouTube[/ame]

cheers

Avin
 
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reeb

reeb

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I'm glad I started this thread because I think it is very important for people to know the truth about these shows! I mean I was so unaware of the reality of them until I actually went to a show and did a lot of research. I hope others will find this thread informative when considering entering their birds into shows.
 

Terry57

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I would like to say that all shows are not like this. I am a member of a small bird club who puts on shows, and the birds entered in these shows are spoiled and pampered. It is a shame that all shows are not held to the same standards. I don't show my birds, but have several close friends who do, and I know how much their birds are loved and well treated.
As far as food and water, it would be an automatic disqualification if the birds don't have access to both here.
 

AkridChaos

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Ah man, what a depressing thread to read through. I’m surprised this is the normal for the average training of a show bird. What I don’t get is how it’s even normal and acceptable to do these things. Why do feathers need to be controlled how they grow? Why does the bird have to act like something it is not? Why isn’t its own natural beauty the one being judged instead of the false one the judges want to see? Being a bird parront, after reading this, there’s no way I could ever go to a bird show. I wouldn’t be able to look at a bird that makes no sound nor has a personality any more, and obviously had its feathers pulled out in one way or another. I would never be able to see the beauty in it, because the bird is something completely unnatural to what it really should be. Who cares if the bird makes noise? They’re supposed to. Their calls are beautiful. That’s like punishing someone for talking or singing by, well, as I read through the thread, hitting them with a stick or holding them underwater. Most people wouldn’t think to do that to a person. Why would you do that to the bird? And why the need to pull out their beautiful natural feathers? So what if one or a few of their feathers aren’t “perfect”. It’s not like every strand of your hair is perfect, and do you care about that? Likely not. It’s part of living. Personally I’d like to see a feather that shows the bird is living it up, maybe a few fray spots where they didn’t perfectly preen themselves, over a perfect feather where you potentially plucked the bird completely and used chemicals/ointments to control the growth of new ones (chicken show bird someone mentioned earlier). Just WHY?! Would you pluck every hair in your body out to make it grow back a certain way? No! Because it would hurt like crazy for one, and two it’s ridiculous anyway, and I guess time consumption plays a factor. But seriously I don’t get why it’s even necessary. Their feathers are their feathers, and are meant to grow a specific way based off their genetics. Why would you try so hard to alter it? Why can’t the way it looks naturally be appreciated for the beauty it really is? Their genetic code makes the feathers that way specifically, so that’s how they should be. Why the need for any plucking? Why the need to force the bird into silence and stillness? There’s nothing beautiful about it. When I picture a bird, I picture something naturally beautiful in every way from its natural calls to their personality to their grace in flight and pride in their feathers (the constant preening proves this). To alter them in any way just honestly mars or hides their true beauty. And for a judge to demand seeing something so unnatural to what a bird truly is, well, that says a lot about them and their guidelines. What’s so wrong about having a natural but TAME bird as a show bird in a contest? I’d rather go see a happy bird making its natural calls, tamely sitting on their human companion, maybe even fly around the room and come back to the owner with a certain cue, act like the complete goofball that they naturally are, than go see a statued, lifeless bird with no hint of a personality. And honestly that goes for any pet and even humans (mostly the children in the beauty pageants) for that matter. I just can’t get any joy out of seeing something unnatural to what it should be. Maybe I’m too old school, I don’t know. But to me, natural beauty is best beauty. The only time I’m prone to calling someone or something ugly is when it’s not natural. Like say, a geisha. They have all that face paint on them. How is that attractive to anyone? I can’t even see your beautiful face under all that. I get most of them probably don’t have a choice in the matter, just like the show birds (and other animals) but for someone to force something like that on another acting like its beautiful is just, well, ugly. All of it. Both the person forcing it onto another, and the one it was forced upon. I think I’ve ranted enough here, you get my drift...
 
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reeb

reeb

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I would like to say that all shows are not like this. I am a member of a small bird club who puts on shows, and the birds entered in these shows are spoiled and pampered. It is a shame that all shows are not held to the same standards. I don't show my birds, but have several close friends who do, and I know how much their birds are loved and well treated.
As far as food and water, it would be an automatic disqualification if the birds don't have access to both here.



Yes, the same applies to shows here. Food and water is a must.

I also don’t think it is a requirement for budgies to be silent in order to be “perfect”. When I went to a show it was definitely very noisy!

Nevertheless, I hate how they are plucked and overfed and shoved in tiny cages just for “perfection”.
 

GBudgie

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Hi everyone,

So I have 10 show budgies, and I love how they look and I really enjoy breeding with them. However I have never actually entered them into competitions (and I don't plan to). I went to my first show this weekend to check it out, and while I really enjoyed seeing some beautiful birds I could see a lot of distress as well. Nevertheless, I have included some pictures from the show at the end of this post.

I decided to do some more research on showing budgies, and I spent a bit of time on the Budgerigar Society of South Africa website, as well as on the international Budgerigar Society website and the World Budgerigar website. I then came across this absolutely despicable and downright cruel method for preparing show budgies for shows. I think this is a general method that a lot of people do use (both here and elsewhere in the world).

Before I post the article, there are certain show requirements that I would like to mention. These include not being mid-molt during the show (your bird will be automatically disqualified). There are specific spotting patterns on the cheeks that must meet certain criteria. Obviously the colours need to match the colour mutation standards. It's all really silly and cosmetic, and I just think it's ridiculous. Here is a link to some of these standards.

Anyway, here is the article I mentioned (I have copy pasted it for convenience sake, and I have emboldened some of the scariest and most cruel sections):

"Start selecting your show team three months before your first show. Start looking for the good show prospects. If you see one, catch it up and put it into a smaller stock cage. This will help the birds get used to a smaller cage. I put several birds into each cage. Make sure you don't crowd them, though. After the birds have been in the smaller cages for a few days, you can start putting them into the show cages for an hour or so at a time. Each time you put a bird into the show cage, leave it a little longer. This will let the bird gradually get used to the cage. The last week or two before the show, I will leave the bird in the show cage for about 24 hours. Make sure you always have plenty of food and water in the show cage when you do this.

After the birds have been in the show cage a few times and have settled down, start training them with a stick. I usually start training the birds by racking the stick across the bars occasionally until the birds get used to this and will stay steady when you do it. To train them to stay on the perch, gently push the stick against their legs. They will step onto the stick, and you can lift them up onto the perch. After a while they will jump up onto the perch when you put the stick through the bars or just barely touch their legs. If you have a bird that leans over the perch, or won't stand up, you can try tapping on the front rail. Many times this will make them straighten up and stand up. After a while they will get the idea. If tapping doesn't work, you can try gently nudging them on the chest. Remember always be gentle and patient. If you feel yourself losing patience, put the birds away and try another time.

Two months before the first show, I pull the two main long tail feathers on each bird. Also check the primary wing flight feathers. If any are broken or frayed, pull them. The best way to pull feathers is to firmly grasp each one and pull steadily.

Two months before the show I start spraying my birds three times a week. If the weather is warm enough, I take the birds outside and spray them with the garden hose fitted with a flower nozzle. I soak the birds thoroughly and let them dry. If it is too cold spray them inside but lighter. One month before the show I increase the spraying to a daily basis. I stop spraying three days before the show.

One of the hardest things for people to learn is how to remove the excess spots from the mask. The way I learned was to look at pictures of show birds to see how the spots were supposed to look. I practised on the birds that I wasn't going to show. I finally learned to spot my birds. You leave one spot under each cheek patch and four on the mask. The four on the mask should be the same size with a symmetrical look.

The second most important thing next to your birds is your show cages. Give your show cages some attention. If they need repair, then do it now. Give them a good cleaning. After you get them clean, check to see if they need repainting. Remember a budgie will look much better in a clean bright show cage.

When you go to the show, take a well conditioned and prepared budgie in a clean bright show cage. Then if your bird is a good bird, and shows well, your bird will have the best chance of taking an award. If your bird doesn't do well don't let it be your fault! Good luck on the show season."

Am I the only one that thinks that this is straight-up animal cruelty?!

Here are some pictures from the show:

I am a member of the Bssa - Budgerigar Society of South Africa.
I read over this post of Reeb your member, it's macilious, astoundingly inaccurate and bears many artifical lies directed at a associations that is well know international for the care and well being of Budgies from wild variety budgies of colour to all of which there are standards on how you learn to take care of your birds, from the general information that they are not meant to be kept in tiny dirt soiled backyard Aviaries or tiny budgie cages sold in petshops, to importance of well balanced diet and nutrients to large flight aviaries.
The importance of large flight avaries are due to fact these birds need to fly to stay healthy. A bird that not healthy, can't fly can't be bred. Knowledge on how to care for your birds the right way in aspects is essential. To see the standards of how these birds are kept in go view

Water hose their birds down in preparation for a show??? Those birds would die of shock on the stop.

Let's be honest any bird kept in cage would then classed as cruelty by apparently a low self esteem person as one members and that would mean all your members would be classed then as guilty of this judgment, let's address some Reebs false comments in his story of cruelty, no member hoses their birds down with water hose for preparation, why is that well show budgies are large who do something like that to their own birdsalong a false inaccurate post
 
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GBudgie

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Hi everyone,

So I have 10 show budgies, and I love how they look and I really enjoy breeding with them. However, I have never actually entered them into competitions (and I don't plan to). I went to my first show this weekend to check it out, and while I really enjoyed seeing some beautiful birds I could see a lot of distress as well. Nevertheless, I have included some pictures from the show at the end of this post.

I decided to do some more research on showing budgies, and I spent a bit of time on the Budgerigar Society of South Africa website, as well as on the international Budgerigar Society website and the World Budgerigar website. I then came across this absolutely despicable and downright cruel method for preparing show budgies for shows. I think this is a general method that a lot of people do use (both here and elsewhere in the world).

Before I post the article, there are certain show requirements that I would like to mention. These include not being mid-molt during the show (your bird will be automatically disqualified). There are specific spotting patterns on the cheeks that must meet certain criteria. Obviously the colours need to match the colour mutation standards. It's all really silly and cosmetic, and I just think it's ridiculous. Here is a link to some of these standards.

Anyway, here is the article I mentioned (I have copy pasted it for convenience sake, and I have emboldened some of the scariest and most cruel sections):

"Start selecting your show team three months before your first show. Start looking for the good show prospects. If you see one, catch it up and put it into a smaller stock cage. This will help the birds get used to a smaller cage. I put several birds into each cage. Make sure you don't crowd them, though. After the birds have been in the smaller cages for a few days, you can start putting them into the show cages for an hour or so at a time. Each time you put a bird into the show cage, leave it a little longer. This will let the bird gradually get used to the cage. The last week or two before the show, I will leave the bird in the show cage for about 24 hours. Make sure you always have plenty of food and water in the show cage when you do this.

After the birds have been in the show cage a few times and have settled down, start training them with a stick. I usually start training the birds by racking the stick across the bars occasionally until the birds get used to this and will stay steady when you do it. To train them to stay on the perch, gently push the stick against their legs. They will step onto the stick, and you can lift them up onto the perch. After a while they will jump up onto the perch when you put the stick through the bars or just barely touch their legs. If you have a bird that leans over the perch, or won't stand up, you can try tapping on the front rail. Many times this will make them straighten up and stand up. After a while they will get the idea. If tapping doesn't work, you can try gently nudging them on the chest. Remember always be gentle and patient. If you feel yourself losing patience, put the birds away and try another time.

Two months before the first show, I pull the two main long tail feathers on each bird. Also check the primary wing flight feathers. If any are broken or frayed, pull them. The best way to pull feathers is to firmly grasp each one and pull steadily.

Two months before the show I start spraying my birds three times a week. If the weather is warm enough, I take the birds outside and spray them with the garden hose fitted with a flower nozzle. I soak the birds thoroughly and let them dry. If it is too cold spray them inside but lighter. One month before the show I increase the spraying to a daily basis. I stop spraying three days before the show.

One of the hardest things for people to learn is how to remove the excess spots from the mask. The way I learned was to look at pictures of show birds to see how the spots were supposed to look. I practised on the birds that I wasn't going to show. I finally learned to spot my birds. You leave one spot under each cheek patch and four on the mask. The four on the mask should be the same size with a symmetrical look.

The second most important thing next to your birds is your show cages. Give your show cages some attention. If they need repair, then do it now. Give them a good cleaning. After you get them clean, check to see if they need repainting. Remember a budgie will look much better in a clean bright show cage.

When you go to the show, take a well conditioned and prepared budgie in a clean bright show cage. Then if your bird is a good bird, and shows well, your bird will have the best chance of taking an award. If your bird doesn't do well don't let it be your fault! Good luck on the show season."

Am I the only one that thinks that this is straight-up animal cruelty?!

Here are some pictures from the show:

 

GBudgie

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Yes the same applies to shows here. Food and water is a must.

I also don’t think it is a requirement for budgies to be silent in order to be “perfect”. When I went to a show it was definitely very noisy!

Nevertheless, I hate how they are plucked and overfed and shoved in tiny cages just for “perfection”.
Go join a club you need it, let me know which club, CPBS, TBC, let me know which one you join so I can be there, before you write anymore obtuse junk that you as an individual can choose to do way better, own it, you don't need to pluck to enter a bird, if you overfeed your birds you know nothing of the nutrition they need.
It's nothing to do with perfection, perfection doesn't exist, not even in humans. It's about being proud of what you've bred, loving them and providing the best for them you can.
As well as being knowledgeable enough on how to breed otherwise you cause feather faults in your birds, etc which cause them pain or taking to a vet when need the help, not leaving in them some backyard soiled avairy to die.
So do you actually know anything about the owners of those birds that you did not ask permission to take photos of or to make use of, I'm not joking, I'm very serious take down those photos or have the balls to send your full name to me, when you post a rare, one of it kind in SA up that you didn't get permission for, it becomes a problem, the prosecuted told me you need take it down and post something when you are more knowledgeable, preferably the truth would be appreciated.
 
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Scott

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Reeb, you did not ask permission from the owners of these birds to take photos or make use of them.

You will need to remove them from your post.

If you had asked you would have been informed, the flash causes stress to the birds.

You also informed an opinion, of malicious inaccurate assumptions within a once off hour visit. You noted you've read from international sources.

What's written by you, is sad. What you've written is logically not be done or followed.

Bssa doesn't educate visitors,an fee entry is paid only to view birds.

The members will learn through their clubs, how to care for the birds from large cleaned flights to balance diet.

All Budgies from wild variety budgie of colour to English show budgies are shown.
Only birds in condition may be benched due to fact that moulting causes stress.

Join a club to learn more, you'll find out the above you've written is very inaccurate and as individual you decide the care you provide to own birds, as they are like our own children.

After you've joined a club, It would be pleasant to see a positive corrected post by you.
Let us begin with manner of quote; reeb's post never contained the following:

"reeb said:
It's very sad and concerning when you come across an post such as Reeb's."

Your response to a three and one half year old dormant thread posited as quote. Member reeb is esteemed contributor but not present to rebut all manner of allegations and demands. Opinions welcome in arena of spirited debate but inadmissible as certitude pending factual submissions and discussion.
 

Terry57

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Reeb, you did not ask permission from the owners of these birds to take photos or make use of them.

You will need to remove them from your post.

If you had asked you would have been informed, the flash causes stress to the birds.

You also informed an opinion, of malicious inaccurate assumptions within a once off hour visit. You noted you've read from international sources.

What's written by you, is sad. What you've written is logically not be done or followed.

Bssa doesn't educate visitors,an fee entry is paid only to view birds.

The members will learn through their clubs, how to care for the birds from large cleaned flights to balance diet.

All Budgies from wild variety budgie of colour to English show budgies are shown.
Only birds in condition may be benched due to fact that moulting causes stress.

Join a club to learn more, you'll find out the above you've written is very inaccurate and as individual you decide the care you provide to own birds, as they are like our own children.

After you've joined a club, It would be pleasant to see a positive corrected post by you.
Wow, so much to unpack here. First, you joined the forum on Wednesday, and on Sunday you think you can tell members who have been here for years what they can and can't post here?
You are a member, not a moderator and it would be a good idea for you to remember that.
I have been to many, many bird shows, and every single one encourages people to take pictures. Funny how things work differently in other people's experiences. That's a good thing to remember as well.
You know what else you should remember?
Be respectful.
I highly suggest you read this thread, the "Closing" applies:

Forum courtesy: guide to forum threads

If you can't speak respectfully to the other members, then perhaps this isn't the right forum for you.

Go join a club you need it, let me know which club, CPBS, TBC, let me know which one you join so I can be there, before you write anymore obtuse junk that you as an individual can choose to do way better, own it, you don't need to pluck to enter a bird, if you overfeed your birds you know nothing of the nutrition they need.
It's nothing to do with perfection, perfection doesn't exist, not even in humans. It's about being proud of what you've bred, loving them and providing the best for them you can.
As well as being knowledgeable enough on how to breed otherwise you cause feather faults in your birds, etc which cause them pain or taking to a vet when need the help, not leaving in them some backyard soiled avairy to die.
So do you actually know anything about the owners of those birds that you did not ask permission to take photos of or to make use of, I'm not joking, I'm very serious take down those photos or have the balls to send your full name to me, when you post a rare, one of it kind in SA up that you didn't get permission for, it becomes a problem, the prosecuter told me you need take it down and post something when you are more knowledgeable, preferably the truth would be appreciated.

The "prosecuter" told you she needs to take down her pictures? LOL, okay.
How do you know she didn't have permission anyway?

I'm not joking either, do not post again in this manner.
 

GBudgie

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Nov 24, 2021
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Let us begin with manner of quote; reeb's post never contained the following:

"reeb said:
It's very sad and concerning when you come across an post such as Reeb's."

Your response to a three and one half year old dormant thread posited as quote. Member reeb is esteemed contributor but not present to rebut all manner of allegations and demands. Opinions welcome in arena of spirited debate but inadmissible as certitude pending factual submissions and discussion.

What I asked him in both posts, posted by myself, was to remove photos of the birds, which Reeb never had permission to take as flash does stress the birds or neither had permission to make use of.
"That's my issue" It as per law or now know as the popi act.
Note:Third time I've asked.
He can easily make use of international resources for pics, the same place he got his information from.

Thats besides the fact of the maciliously incorrect information he posted, I am aware he has clearly never been a member of either a club or bssa, otherwise he wouldn't have posted it with macilious cause, because he would have known they are guidelines.

As for the rest of international resources, use your savy or your brain, don't go doing everything you see and thinking it's the norm because it's not. Each member has their own ways and it's something that needs to be experienced.

Club member of R200/12USD/9 pound per year, this is where gain your a-z knowledge to take care of them. First thing I did to know more.

Bssa members of R180/11USD/8 pound per year. New members this year are free, this was structured by bssa due to covid financial issues for the new members wanting to join.
This allows you to register your birds and if you want to show you can enter any variety of Show budgie thats in condition.

Unfortunately SA has alot of backyard breeders of many type of animals, none of them register any of their animals and very seldom take good care of them, as they just into breeding and selling unregistered animals.

1.You don't need to prepare a bird that's already in condition.
Tip-well balanced diet and nutrients is important for growth of their feathers.
The importance of large flight avaries are due to fact these birds need to fly to stay healthy.
You can't force moulting, it's one of the birds most stressful periods.

2.You don't need to train a bird to sit on perch, it will automatically do it by itself. It comes natural.
You do not stick the bird with a stick, etc
Tip-point your finger at the tip of the perch and voice up, your bird will know, they are not stupid.
3.You do not take a stick over the bars.
Tip-You play music for them during the day, they love music, it makes them use to people and hold them when are chicks,adults are same they will come to you to be held.
4.You never water hose your bird, you will shock the birds and they will die.
Tip-You can place down low water level bathing facilities for them, they will naturally bathe themselves. They love water. Stay by them when they bathe.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Scott

Moderator
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RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
What I asked him in both posts, posted by myself, was to remove photos of the birds, which Reeb never had permission to take as flash does stress the birds or neither had permission to make use of.
"That's my issue" It as per law or now know as the popi act.
Note:Third time I've asked.
He can easily make use of international resources for pics, the same place he got his information from.

Thats besides the fact of the maciliously incorrect information he posted, I am aware he has clearly never been a member of either a club or bssa, otherwise he wouldn't have posted it with macilious cause, because he would have known they are guidelines.

As for the rest of international resources, use your savy or your brain, don't go doing everything you see and thinking it's the norm because it's not. Each member has their own ways and it's something that needs to be experienced.

Club member of R200/12USD/9 pound per year, this is where gain your a-z knowledge to take care of them. First thing I did to know more.

Bssa members of R180/11USD/8 pound per year. New members this year are free, this was structured by bssa due to covid financial issues for the new members wanting to join.
This allows you to register your birds and if you want to show you can enter any variety of Show budgie thats in condition.

Unfortunately SA has alot of backyard breeders of many type of animals, none of them register any of their animals and very seldom take good care of them, as they just into breeding and selling unregistered animals.

1.You don't need to prepare a bird that's already in condition.
Tip-well balanced diet and nutrients is important for growth of their feathers.
The importance of large flight avaries are due to fact these birds need to fly to stay healthy.
You can't force moulting, it's one of the birds most stressful periods.

2.You don't need to train a bird to sit on perch, it will automatically do it by itself. It comes natural.
You do not stick the bird with a stick, etc
Tip-point your finger at the tip of the perch and voice up, your bird will know, they are not stupid.
3.You do not take a stick over the bars.
Tip-You play music for them during the day, they love music, it makes them use to people and hold them when are chicks,adults are same they will come to you to be held.
4.You never water hose your bird, you will shock the birds and they will die.
Tip-You can place down low water level bathing facilities for them, they will naturally bathe themselves. They love water. Stay by them when they bathe.
Veracity of your rebuttal sags with faulty pronoun assumption - "reeb" is verified female. ♀️

Kindly provide affidavits of personal expertise before barking allegations and commands. Can you prove use of flash photography? Before asserting "malicious" intent, a grasp of spelling or employment of corrective software helpful to convey seriousness. I would imagine a lofty prosecutor would directly address reeb on the forum rather than passive aggressively speak through you.
 

Skarila

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Apr 19, 2021
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✻Pascal the Emma's (Venezuelan) Conure

Previous owned:
✻Archibald the cockatiel (fostered 6 months)
✻RIP - 28 YO Zeleni the mischievous IRN
✻RIP -Sunny the budgie
While it is always welcoming to read more correct info about something, and it is okay to share that information and point out if a member got it all wrong, but Lord, the amount of RUDENESS.

So about the pictures - they are not taken with a flash. A photo with a flash looks so much more different and any photographer can confirm this. The contrast is actually low and there is no flashback on the bars at all. The background would've been much darker. Obviously there is indoor lighting. No flashes give warm light, especially not on phones. Conclusion? No flashes were used, birds were not stressed. And funniest of all - not even your birds, since you keep repeating that the person didn't "ask the owners for pics". So why care?

Instead of going full Karen here for whatever reason that rustled your jimmies, some kindness and understanding will take you much further.
 

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