Friendly cockatoos but they're lonely

Ratsratsrats

New member
Feb 21, 2021
17
0
Soon to be NC!
Parrots
Currently, none
Hello, my life has changed very suddenly and I might be working at a sanctuary soon (if you want the shortened version of this please go to the end). They have three macaws with behavioral issues and two cockatoos. I posted about the macaws in the macaw section. Everyone I've talked to at that sanctuary says they're too afraid to pick up the birds so they don't get proper handling and they don't get proper care. The friendliest of their birds are the two cockatoos, which are kept in cage and you're allowed to pet them through the bar. They say that they have behavioral issues though and that when you try to hold them they bite so they don't get the best care.
I watched these cockatoos get pet on on chest by visitors and it made me cringe knowing that that's a mating ritual for birds. When I went over I pet their head and they were craving the attention and wanting their new feathers to be popped which I help them out with for like 30 minutes.
I want to work at the sanctuary and bond with their cockatoos to help them out and give them a better quality of life. But my question is can I Bond these two cockatoos together? One is an umbrella cockatoo and one is a salmon created cockatoo (I think). The cages are housed next to each other and when there's no one passing by they're huddled against each other through the bars as if they want to be cuddling but they can't. If I can get them bonded I want to build them their own aviary (through donations) connected to a greenhouse. I might start an Instagram account for the birds, but I might also just talk to the owners and convince them to hire social media manager, that way they can get more donations.

Short: I want to work at a sanctuary where everyone is too scared to work with the birds. The cockatoos are very friendly, but I want to know if I can Bond a salmon crested cockatoo with an umbrella cockatoo. They live next to each other and seem to want to cuddle, but there are bars between them.
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
341
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
Welcome and I am sorry to be a kill-joy:

macaws and cockatoos should not be housed in the same home (especially 3 ) many MACAWS ARE HYPERSENSITIVE (often, or can become so) to the dander/powder these birds produce (cockatiels and greys don't hold a candle in comparison to the dangerous amount of dander/powder produced by most cockatoos---especially u2s and m2s)...it can kill them even if it takes time. Macaw respiratory hypersensitivity is very serious and should not be ignored...especially with the most notorious of powder-down birds (u2s and m2s)..
Even if you didn't have ,macaws (which you do, so this is a moot point), I'd ask, how old are your cockatoos, what type and how long have you interacted with them? Have you ever had interactions with them outside of the high stimuli environment of a rescue and if so, for how many months (because these guys are not simple to know)? These parrots are as complicated as they get, and I too can woo almost any umbrella (because I have one who is 15 and no longer have any fear---period) BUT---that does not mean that they will get along, or be "chill" with others...This is very serious. I love them dearly, but what is your bird ownership experience (honestly) and how many years have you personally lived with one or more umbrella of sexual maturity in your home? 4-8 you could have a sexually immature baby and that is not the same. I think it is awesome that you want to care for the MOST RE-HOMED bird in the bird-trade, but so many people let the bonding begin, only to find that they are in over their heads. I am asking questions because I care so much about these guys and I grew up working with many other species-- they are very unique, so just make sure you know what the rules are as far as touching on the head and neck only without any shadowy spaces or "cuddles" (which are the undoing of these birds as adults).

If you had no other birds, I would still strongly caution you to spend more time and research etc and make sure you had time for a toddler with EXTREME special needs etc, before committing, but you already are in deep with your other birds, and cockatoos can seriously harm those that you have.



Don't get me wrong, U2s can be so sweet and funny and ridiculous, but they are INTENSE and keeping such dusty birds around a macaw can cause serious damage over time.
 
Last edited:
OP
R

Ratsratsrats

New member
Feb 21, 2021
17
0
Soon to be NC!
Parrots
Currently, none
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
I don't know their age and haven't spent much time with them. I just want to help out the sanctuary since no one is willing to reach into the cages and handle the birds. The birds are housed in the same building with a variety of other exotic mammals and reptiles. The place has way to many animals because their location in florida had to be suddenly shut down and they needed to emergency ship the animals from that location. I just want to help since I'm not afraid of nasty bites and maybe even convince the owner to send the birds off to a proper bird sanctuary.
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
341
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I so appreciate that you want to help and it sounds like they need it. I just really want to make sure that you know what you may be getting into..because for me, life with a U2 was shockingly more intense than life with any other parrot I have experienced.


You could look at fostering (maybe) but I still wouldn't do the macaw,cockatoo combo. Keep in mind that, if you form a bond, surrendering that bird afterwards does leave an emotional scar and can impact future behavior...Then again, if these guys are going to be euthanized or something (if they stay) then I guess that would change things.


Have you had large parrots before? It sounds like you may have, as you knew about the sexual nature of such petting, and the preening needs, but just make sure you are fully prepared and have a set job, work schedule, funds, study ABA etc. There is a lot that goes into retro-fitting lifestyle to accommodate any bird, but cockatoos, again are so very needy and emotional. I love them, I have one..I thought I knew what it would be like to "own" one because this was not my "first rodeo" with parrots, but it was still a major shock to my system (mine was an adult when I got her, and I have had her for many years). It's definitely a huge undertaking when you think about their unique mate/flock dynamics (they need even more than other parrots socially, but you also can create a monster if you lack boundaries).I'd be happy to go into more detail but I don't want to bombard you. They are genuinely different from other parrots (sometimes for better and for worse). I would just urge as much cockatoo experience as possible (not just parrot experience) before taking the plunge to full ownership, but if you really are committed and have lived with parrots, have a ton of time, practice tough love, set a schedule/ and know where you are going to be working/living indefinitely, then they do need people to adopt them for sure (again, most re-homed due to extreme noise, plucking and aggression etc-- some of which can be mitigated by human behavior, but some of which cannot). Make sure you are in it for the long-haul and have the money and schedule to give them the bedtimes and playtimes that they need (12 hours sleep for cockatoos is a must, nightly).

You are doing the right thing by trying to help.

Both macaws and cockatoos require massive cages--- macaws (depending on the type) need insanely large ones. Both require insane costs for upkeep, toys, veterinary care (CAV) etc. Macaws will be more expensive in terms of housing.

Do you know what type of cockatoo? That also makes a difference, because while all are generally considered a bit nutty/needy/loud, I would say that I have seen far more surrendered U2s (followed by moluccans) than any other type. They top the charts when it comes to surrenders due to their tendency to struggle in captivity if their needs are not being met (and they determine those, not people, as you know). They are very sensitive and emotional-- their body language is also tricky when compared to parrots like Amazons or Greys--- you do learn it as you go, but they can get offended easily if you mis-read and it's not so much about not being able to handle a painful bite, as it is about bonding and avoiding bites (as each time a parrot bites, it provides greater practice, human reactions, stress reactions etc). If people are getting bitten, they are doing it wrong. u2s can be SOOOO HILARIOUS and they really can be sweet, but you always have to keep in mind that their ultimate drive is to pair off and mate, and they can get super angry if sexually frustrated or jealous etc.

Age will also be a huge factor, as babies are deceptive in their behavior. I am pro adult-bird adoption because it is much more of a "what you see is more likely to be sort of what you get" ,,,vs babies who haven't developed their adult personality with hormones etc...Not to mention the insane number of these birds in rescues.

It sounds like they are in a terrible situation and again, I applaud you for noticing. It's very sad and I hope you can help because it sounds like someone needs to! Poor birds...I just wouldn't ever even consider getting 3 macaws at once, plus a cockatoo (not only because they shouldn't be in the same home, but because they are so dang complicated and expensive and you could get in way over your head with even one of these birds in many cases).


I would also avoid shipping if you are able (even if you have to drive many hours) because the one time I did it (after triple checking controlled temps, diseases etc) it still was really hard on Noodles...Then again, I guess she did survive it, so that is something you have to decide, but it can be very very stressful for them. If you do ship, make sure you have a certified avian vet lined up because stress weakens their immune system and can cause dormant diseases to flare up etc. It also makes them more susceptible to bacteria and viruses in general.
 
Last edited:
OP
R

Ratsratsrats

New member
Feb 21, 2021
17
0
Soon to be NC!
Parrots
Currently, none
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
I so appreciate that you want to help and it sounds like they need it. I just really want to make sure that you know what you may be getting into..because for me, life with a U2 was shockingly more intense than life with any other parrot I have experienced.


You could look at fostering (maybe) but I still wouldn't do the macaw,cockatoo combo. Keep in mind that, if you form a bond, surrendering that bird afterwards does leave an emotional scar and can impact future behavior...Then again, if these guys are going to be euthanized or something (if they stay) then I guess that would change things.


Have you had large parrots before? It sounds like you may have, as you knew about the sexual nature of such petting, and the preening needs, but just make sure you are fully prepared and have a set job, work schedule, funds, study ABA etc. There is a lot that goes into retro-fitting lifestyle to accommodate any bird, but cockatoos, again are so very needy and emotional. I love them, I have one..I thought I knew what it would be like to "own" one because this was not my "first rodeo" with parrots, but it was still a major shock to my system (mine was an adult when I got her, and I have had her for many years). It's definitely a huge undertaking when you think about their unique mate/flock dynamics (they need even more than other parrots socially, but you also can create a monster if you lack boundaries).I'd be happy to go into more detail but I don't want to bombard you. They are genuinely different from other parrots (sometimes for better and for worse). I would just urge as much cockatoo experience as possible (not just parrot experience) before taking the plunge to full ownership, but if you really are committed and have lived with parrots, have a ton of time, practice tough love, set a schedule/ and know where you are going to be working/living indefinitely, then they do need people to adopt them for sure (again, most re-homed due to extreme noise, plucking and aggression etc-- some of which can be mitigated by human behavior, but some of which cannot). Make sure you are in it for the long-haul and have the money and schedule to give them the bedtimes and playtimes that they need (12 hours sleep for cockatoos is a must, nightly).

You are doing the right thing by trying to help.

Both macaws and cockatoos require massive cages--- macaws (depending on the type) need insanely large ones. Both require insane costs for upkeep, toys, veterinary care (CAV) etc. Macaws will be more expensive in terms of housing.

Do you know what type of cockatoo? That also makes a difference, because while all are generally considered a bit nutty/needy/loud, I would say that I have seen far more surrendered U2s (followed by moluccans) than any other type. They top the charts when it comes to surrenders due to their tendency to struggle in captivity if their needs are not being met (and they determine those, not people, as you know). They are very sensitive and emotional-- their body language is also tricky when compared to parrots like Amazons or Greys--- you do learn it as you go, but they can get offended easily if you mis-read and it's not so much about not being able to handle a painful bite, as it is about bonding and avoiding bites (as each time a parrot bites, it provides greater practice, human reactions, stress reactions etc). If people are getting bitten, they are doing it wrong. u2s can be SOOOO HILARIOUS and they really can be sweet, but you always have to keep in mind that their ultimate drive is to pair off and mate, and they can get super angry if sexually frustrated or jealous etc.

Age will also be a huge factor, as babies are deceptive in their behavior. I am pro adult-bird adoption because it is much more of a "what you see is more likely to be sort of what you get" ,,,vs babies who haven't developed their adult personality with hormones etc...Not to mention the insane number of these birds in rescues.

It sounds like they are in a terrible situation and again, I applaud you for noticing. It's very sad and I hope you can help because it sounds like someone needs to! Poor birds...I just wouldn't ever even consider getting 3 macaws at once, plus a cockatoo (not only because they shouldn't be in the same home, but because they are so dang complicated and expensive and you could get in way over your head with even one of these birds in many cases).


I would also avoid shipping if you are able (even if you have to drive many hours) because the one time I did it (after triple checking controlled temps, diseases etc) it still was really hard on Noodles...Then again, I guess she did survive it, so that is something you have to decide, but it can be very very stressful for them. If you do ship, make sure you have a certified avian vet lined up because stress weakens their immune system and can cause dormant diseases to flare up etc. It also makes them more susceptible to bacteria and viruses in general.

The sanctuary has two cockatoos. An umbrella and a salmon crested cockatoo. I suppose I may not have made it clear enough because I felt rushed to type. They're housed in separate cages right next to each other and seem to want to cuddle. I haven't personally owned a bird, but have cared for others birds and have done research because I've been interested in small birds for some time. I'll be moving fairly close to the sanctuary soon, half an hour away.
I'm not sure I'll be able to take them into my home, but at the very least I want to improve their quality of life at the sanctuary or convince the sanctuary owner to let me take them to a bird sanctuary because it's obvious that they work better with mammals and reptiles since no one is able to work with the birds.
Idk, it's a bit of a weird situation. Once I move there I'm sure the path will be clearer.
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 21, 2010
32,164
6,199
San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
What you describe is unfortunate warehousing of rescued animals in a sanctuary-like setting. Is their goal truly as sanctuary where animals live out their natural lives, or do they permit fostering/adopting? Important distinction as permanent life in a sanctuary is all about adaptation while socializing for adoptions becomes necessary.

Absolutely possible for cockatoo species of closely similar size to share a cage and bond. Certainly want to avoid unwanted breeding to include hybrids, so no nest boxes.

You'll need more information and good understanding of ground rules before proceeding. Kudos for seeking to enrich their lives!
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
341
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I would not house them together, as that will likely lead to hormones and possible breeding, plus, there is no cage large enough to house 2 at once (unless you get a massive aviary--keeping in mind wire gauge, bar spacing and metals, as zinc, copper and most metals in the US aside from stainless can be poisonous just from mouthing-- powder coated iron cages can be safe if you can verify the contents of the powder coat and replace it when chipping). My U2 loves ALL animals and birds (from a far). She is so insanely interested in all other animals that it is hazardous almost. My point is, 2 cockatoos may get along really well, but then you have to consider what that leads to. Some of the smaller species do really well together, and they all certainly have a high social drive, but that doesn't mean you will like the results of social interaction if it impacts hormones and thus mood.


A male and a female of those two species can hybridize (a cockatoo and cockatiel can also reproduce). Also, even if they are the same gender, they can still get hormonal together. 2 females sometimes will engage in sexual behavior and then both start laying infertile eggs (which is a health hazard). Two males can also get hormonal. An opposite sex pair can mate and reproduce and that is something which must be avoided, as it is beyond complicated.

teflon/ptfe/pfoa/pfcs= not safe for use in the same home with any bird, and they are found throughout most kitchens, but also are found in blow dryers, space heaters, electric blankets, scotch guard, straighteners, drip trays, heat lamps, utility lamp reflectors, ironing boards, irons etc etc. They are EXTREMELY common in rice cookers, popcorn poppers, microwave popcorn (in the bag), electric skillets, pots, pans, air fryers etc. This is not something to mess with at all. You do not want to use them if you have birds---even if you put them on another floor and shut the door, these chemicals can and do kill.

Fumes of any sort and standard cleaners, air fresheners, perfumes, candles, glad plug-ins, fabreeze, stains, polishes, insect sprays, carpet shampoos, flea treatments etc etc all are also things that you cannot use safely if you own a bird.

Each bird needs AT LEAST 3-4 hours out of cage time daily and 12 hours sleep (on a set schedule). They need a bedtime and wakeup routine. If they fight or try to mate and cannot be out at the same time, this becomes very very complicated, given the fact that each needs so much time out of the cage and because of bedtime restrictions. They are also extremely complicated when it comes to visiting others with them, as most people use deadly products in their homes, like bleach and ptfe/pfoa/pfcs/Teflon.

Hormones are extremely serious for parrots-- especially larger cockatoos and eclectus parrots. Sometimes, they bond to another bird and then become aggressive towards humans and other times, they can bond with humans and become aggressive to other birds. These are just 2 of the complicated (but overwhelmingly common) scenarios...Although there is PLENTY negative to say about cockatoos, one small perk is that they do tend to be slightly less prone to becoming "one person" birds, but when I say that, please understand that their obsessions with a single person can still lead to blood-shed and stitches---the difference is, their preferences are slightly more flexible due to the fact hat (as stated previously) they bond with a mate but continue to stay with the flock. The downside of this same "perk"/curse is that it also makes it extremely difficult to meet their needs because you are literally filling the shoes of hundreds of other parrots, plus a mate (and while you do not want to be a mate or lead them to believe that you are, if they bond to you, they will almost always make this assumption/jump).

If you live in an apartment or plan to, neither macaws or cockatoos are a good fit (no matter the species). They are destructive and certain cockatoos are jet-engine loud (in actual decibels, not exaggerating). In a tantrum, Noodles has screamed at deafening levels for over 8 hours before. That isn't daily (the 8 hours), but it can easily get that way if you do not understand ABA and know how to respond etc (that is a major reason why they are given up). If you plan to travel internationally or go out of town often, unless you bring your birds (which is very complicated) that is another serious thing that these guys do not tolerate well-- boarding them poses disease risk and deprives them of socialization etc.

A really super important thing to know about parrots is how insanely well they hide illness. I have known birds who lost toes and acted totally normal. They will not show any signs until things are dire. This requires an insane amount of attention to every little detail and a certified avian vet (regular vets may be able to provide triage-style care in an absolute emergency, but when it comes to many serious situations, they do not measure up).

Adopting a cockatoo (especially a U2 or M2) is a lot like adopting a super-needy child with special needs and extreme "allergies" to your lifestyle. This child may love you in an overly obsessive way, or be mad at you. When you have a bonded cockatoo, there are moments where there is nothing cuter or funnier, but this "child" also is far louder than any megaphone and has a chainsaw on its face. Imagine a 3-year old with autism (no offense intended-- I work with many people on the spectrum and even they agree) that never grows up but still requires set bedtimes etc--- it can be very tricky to explain this to co-workers when you cannot do anything until you get home and put the bird to bed. You will also cook for them and the dust they produce is intense. You will want to drop around 650-2000 on a serious air filter and purifier (non ionizing, non sanitizing, non ozone producing--- you can get one with these settings, as long as they can remain off at all times).

Last thing for now: birds can be asymptomatic, lifetime carriers of deadly diseases and can spread these to others despite showing no symptoms and potentially, negative test results as well. This means that you should never take your bird around other birds and always quarantine new birds in a separate air space for, ideally 3 months but absolutely no less than 45 days (unless they already were in close contact). Feather dander in air shafts/hvac units can spread dangerous disease as well and clothes should be changed between handling during quarantine.


I am putting this all out there in case you are thinking of taking them into your home because I just want to make sure you are prepared. There is nothing as rewarding, time-consuming or frustrating than a cockatoo lol! They are so amazingly unique, but they are so unnatural in our homes and it can be a struggle. They are in a terrible situation right now, so I just want you to have an idea of what you may need to adjust ahead of time.
 
Last edited:
OP
R

Ratsratsrats

New member
Feb 21, 2021
17
0
Soon to be NC!
Parrots
Currently, none
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #8
I'm not sure about the majority of the parrot owning population, but I'm not against hollowing out an egg or swapping it out for a dunce. With the brief moments I had to talk with employees it doesn't seem like either of them are females, but if I were to take them home with me or try to bond them I would like to get them DNA tested. I suppose when the time comes to decide I'll post again. If I do end up getting them I want to build them a large greenhouse with a outdoor aviary attached. Greenhouse would be heated during winter.
But the future is still uncertain and I still have one more move to make in my life, I ultimately want to end up in Pennsylvania I need to take them to consideration when getting a long term pet such as a cockatoo.
I don't think they adopt out animals, but I'm hoping I do become good enough friends with the owners to convince them to adopt out their guinea pigs, chinchillas, and tortoises so that they have more funds to take care of their more exotic animals like sloths and porcupines. But also help with their serious overcrowding issue they're having at the moment.
I moved there in June and hope to be working there in July, at the very least volunteering to help out.
 

whitney.phillips919

New member
Feb 23, 2021
12
0
I don't know their age and haven't spent much time with them. I just want to help out the sanctuary since no one is willing to reach into the cages and handle the birds. The birds are housed in the same building with a variety of other exotic mammals and reptiles. The place has way to many animals because their location in florida had to be suddenly shut down and they needed to emergency ship the animals from that location. I just want to help since I'm not afraid of nasty bites and maybe even convince the owner to send the birds off to a proper bird sanctuary.


This is so awful. I would be wanting to help too. What a monstrous thing to think about. They can’t sell the animals so they have to just sit there and suffer [emoji24] I want all of them


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 21, 2010
32,164
6,199
San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
General rule of thumb with cockatoos is light brown eyes signify female, coal-black typically male. I can attest that is not always the case, so either physical evidence of eggs or DNA sampling a must.

Oh, two cockatoos of disparate species yet similar size can co-habitate. I have a proven male Goffins paired with female Citron in large flight cage. Both separated from previous same-species mates due to cockatoo aggression. I observed them for nearly a year as they lived in adjacent flight cages, tested waters by letting them visit on neutral grounds. Bottom line, female Citron a tad larger than Goffin, just enough to keep him respectful. No nest box, and aside from mutual feeding, no unwanted sexual aggression. Both happy, full feathered, and willing to interact with their humans in low-key manner.

I hope they don't implode from overtaxing scarce resources and have issues with overcrowding and wide array of species. There are good reasons sanctuaries tend to focus on narrow band of unwanted animals and tailor their entire operation accordingly. Not easy to be a jack-of-all-trades facility!
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
341
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I'm not sure about the majority of the parrot owning population, but I'm not against hollowing out an egg or swapping it out for a dunce. With the brief moments I had to talk with employees it doesn't seem like either of them are females, but if I were to take them home with me or try to bond them I would like to get them DNA tested. I suppose when the time comes to decide I'll post again. If I do end up getting them I want to build them a large greenhouse with a outdoor aviary attached. Greenhouse would be heated during winter.
But the future is still uncertain and I still have one more move to make in my life, I ultimately want to end up in Pennsylvania I need to take them to consideration when getting a long term pet such as a cockatoo.
I don't think they adopt out animals, but I'm hoping I do become good enough friends with the owners to convince them to adopt out their guinea pigs, chinchillas, and tortoises so that they have more funds to take care of their more exotic animals like sloths and porcupines. But also help with their serious overcrowding issue they're having at the moment.
I moved there in June and hope to be working there in July, at the very least volunteering to help out.

The egg itself is a small part of the risk-- laying is harmful to their bodies when it happens often (it depletes nutrients and can lead to egg-binding, prolapse, internal bleeding etc). Even if a bird never lays, they can prolapse if their hormones lead to constant contractions of certain sexual muscles. Many cockatoos are picky eaters and they are prone to obesity and dietary issues, as well as serious behavior problems (often related to hormones). Dietary deficiencies make them more likely to have issues, but it is not limited to birds with poor diets.



Cockatoos love shadowy spaces (cavity nesters) and should never have access-- especially U2s, M2s and sulfur crested. That means no allowing under furniture, up against your body, in cabinets or drawers, huts, tubes, tents, blankets, in paper piles, up against the backs of couches/in pillows etc... Nope, nope , nope...do they love it? YES. Will it mess with them? LIKELY.


If a bird does lay, they will know that you hollowed out their egg if you do...that would not work (although it is creative). They see EVERYTHING and their vision (colors and details) is far superior to ours. The weight change alone would be a dead giveaway and if they haven't lost interest, they could recreate the cycle and produce more follicles for another clutch.

You never want to remove an egg until the bird loses interest (although you may quickly boil a fertile egg and mark it with a pen dot so that you know it has already been dealt with and prevent hatching-- you must return it once safe to touch). Nevertheless, that doesn't change the fact that broody birds have extreme behaviors in many cases, and the laying is not good for them in general. There is a good website with dummy eggs for various species, but again, I do think you are underestimating how allowing these 2 to get together could seriously impact behavior.

If you are contemplating ownership, don't even think of this as a pet. I truly believe they (U2s especially) are a larger commitment than a human child or a spouse. Why? Because it is all on you and they live forever...plus, they self destruct when unhappy and our homes already are ill-suited for them. You can't divorce a cockatoo and no one pities you when you say how much work/stress it is...plus, they are so dang sensitive to common household products which can kill them. They never grow up, they have the capacity to scream in such a way that it drives you to absolute madness and destroys relationships with humans in the home and they have a tri-point bite (which is particularly brutal when they want it to be). Those are the bad parts--- if you are in it for real and have the experience/means, then expect it to be far more work than play (but know that the play can be so freaking adorable).


I agree that it CAN work but you don't know it will work...that is the thing. You have to be prepared for it not to work before having one cage only and just hoping it will. The reproduction and hormonal behavior can also change this a lot and smaller species tend to be less notorious than u2s.


In terms of petting/touching, my u2 is way cooler about that than our grey was, but the grey was so much calmer, quieter and just independent in comparison. Plus, you really have to be careful with petting too much with a cockatoo, as they would let you pet them all day and then get hormonal and annoyed.
 
Last edited:

Siobhan

New member
Apr 19, 2015
685
5
Illinois
Parrots
Clyde, Quaker; Freddie, tiel; Rocky, umbrella cockatoo.
Is anyone actually reading the original post? She's not talking about taking them home. She's talking about working with them at the sanctuary and trying to make them more comfortable there.

If you're able to pet them through the bars, and if the people who run the place will let you, go ahead and try interacting without the cage between you, one at a time at first. See if the birds will accept your friendship. Let them lead the way. If they are craving human interaction, they might. If that goes well you can try having them together for play time but be alert in case there's aggression between the birds or toward you if one or both of them gets jealous. You'll have to take it slow and make sure they will get along before putting them in a shared enclosure and you don't want to spend a lot of effort and money building one for them to share until you're sure it will work.
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 21, 2010
32,164
6,199
San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Is anyone actually reading the original post? She's not talking about taking them home. She's talking about working with them at the sanctuary and trying to make them more comfortable there.

If you're able to pet them through the bars, and if the people who run the place will let you, go ahead and try interacting without the cage between you, one at a time at first. See if the birds will accept your friendship. Let them lead the way. If they are craving human interaction, they might. If that goes well you can try having them together for play time but be alert in case there's aggression between the birds or toward you if one or both of them gets jealous. You'll have to take it slow and make sure they will get along before putting them in a shared enclosure and you don't want to spend a lot of effort and money building one for them to share until you're sure it will work.

Well yes, I read and responded accordingly, attempted to answer specific questions of multi-species co-habitation. :confused:
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
341
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
Is anyone actually reading the original post? She's not talking about taking them home. She's talking about working with them at the sanctuary and trying to make them more comfortable there.

If you're able to pet them through the bars, and if the people who run the place will let you, go ahead and try interacting without the cage between you, one at a time at first. See if the birds will accept your friendship. Let them lead the way. If they are craving human interaction, they might. If that goes well you can try having them together for play time but be alert in case there's aggression between the birds or toward you if one or both of them gets jealous. You'll have to take it slow and make sure they will get along before putting them in a shared enclosure and you don't want to spend a lot of effort and money building one for them to share until you're sure it will work.


I did read it and other posts and I was still under the impression that adoption was in the cards for macaw and cockatoo..Granted, there are 2 threads going and my responses drew from both.
 

Most Reactions

Latest posts

Top