Getting an Indian Ringneck

IndianRingnecks4me

New member
Sep 2, 2018
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Hi guys. Im going to buy an indian ringneck soon and on top of all the research, I'd like more info by indian ringneck owners. Just stuff like how to care for them, what to feed them etc. I love reading long things so a long answer is great! I also would like a suggestion for the cage! I'll spend around 150 on the cage though. Thanks and I look forward to your answers!
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
352
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
You know you can't use Teflon/PTFOA/PTFE I assume (in everything from non-stick pans, to ironing board, to rice-cookers, to blow-dryers).


Anything with a scent and anything that produces smoke is out (no cleaners (ammonia, bleach, lysol, pinesol etc....all kill birds)....must be avian-safe or something like vinegar and water...Hairspray, paints, nail-polish remover, candles- scented or non, smoke of any kind, burning food, spray-on-deodorant, air freshener (Fabreeze) etc..


Make sure you research sleep---birds need set lighting and sleep schedules, so late bedtimes are a no-go...as is sleeping in (for you).
 
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Owlet

Well-known member
Oct 27, 2016
2,163
426
Colorado
Parrots
Lincoln (Eclectus), Apollo (Cockatiel), Aster (GCC)
I have to disagree with noodles on the sleep part. YOU can do whatever you want sleep wise for the most part. You must be comfortable with putting the bird somewhere it will NOT be bothered at night and get a full 9 hours of sleep. You WILL have to get up relatively early to feed your bird but after that, who says you cant you back to sleep for a bit?
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
352
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I have to disagree with noodles on the sleep part. YOU can do whatever you want sleep wise for the most part. You must be comfortable with putting the bird somewhere it will NOT be bothered at night and get a full 9 hours of sleep. You WILL have to get up relatively early to feed your bird but after that, who says you cant you back to sleep for a bit?


if your bird goes to bed at 10 one night and wakes up at 10 the next day, and then you keep it up until 12 and wake it up at 10 again and 8 the next, that is a huge problem for their health (if it goes on long enough---and it does depend on the variety of bird)...Regardless,they need the minimum amount of sleep consistently and they do tend to get into a cycle. My bird puts herself to bed and it is like clockwork---if I try to keep her up, she becomes irritable and cranky. With a bird, you can't just wake it up whenever you please--if bird goes to sleep at say, 6pm but you stay up until 2am, you aren't keeping that bird covered until you feel like waking up at 10am. I have read 10-12 hours per night for most birds.

You can't always put it back to sleep for a bit----depends on the bird, but I have known more than one that didn't sleep if it was light outside...again, it may depend on the type, but this has not been my experience. Mine is super angsty when sleepy....more prone to over-preen etc...I mean, yeah, you can lock them in their cage again, but that doesn't change the fact that by the time you wash out water dishes, chop veg/fruit, change food and cage liner and talk to bird, you will be pretty awake...even if you feel like crap. And your bird may or may not nap.


Owlet- you are right that a bird can go to bed "late", but assuming this person has a job, then they will need to wake the bird before work and a late bedtime will not be conducive to appropriate sleep.
 
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Owlet

Well-known member
Oct 27, 2016
2,163
426
Colorado
Parrots
Lincoln (Eclectus), Apollo (Cockatiel), Aster (GCC)
I'm talking about the human sleeping whenever, not the bird. I know birds need steady sleep.

Owlet- you are right that a bird can go to bed "late", but assuming this person has a job, then they will need to wake the bird before work and a late bedtime will not be conducive to appropriate sleep.

I never said ANYTHING about the bird going to bed late. The HUMAN can sleep whenever they'd like as long as the bird is place in an area it will NOT be bothered by human activity. My post was entirely about HUMAN sleeping habits.
 
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noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
352
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I'm talking about the human sleeping whenever, not the bird. I know birds need steady sleep.

Owlet- you are right that a bird can go to bed "late", but assuming this person has a job, then they will need to wake the bird before work and a late bedtime will not be conducive to appropriate sleep.
I never said ANYTHING about the bird going to bed late. The HUMAN can sleep whenever they'd like as long as the bird is place in an area it will NOT be bothered by human activity. My post was entirely about HUMAN sleeping habits.


Yes- as long as they are quiet enough to allow the bird to sleep. My whole point is that birds need a bedtime and that you have to wake up when the bird does in order to feed it , uncover it etc. Sorry if I misunderstood. In my original post, I said, "birds need set lighting and sleep schedules, so late bedtimes are a no-go...as is sleeping in (for you)."---because a sleeping human can't uncover and feed a bird and a working human will inevitably have to wake their bird up before work.
 
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itchyfeet

New member
Nov 1, 2014
1,013
7
Middle Earth
Parrots
Ethyl the cockatiel, Henry & Clarke the IRN's, and Skittles the lovebird (my daughters)
I'm not overly conscious of any of my fid's sleeping habits. They're free to do their own thing, as am I. It's winter/early spring here at the moment so I will try to ensure they're covered overnight, but their room has full windows on both sides so they can do as they please a bit in the natural light.

There's not a massive range of cages in NZ, so these are our go to:
http://theparrotplace.co.nz/ppkeri/wp-content/uploads/images/products/p-1913-604-2.jpg
The ringnecks & lovebirds have their feed doors cable tied with alternative food and water containers - they're smart creatures!

Nearly as important as the cage, are bongs/a playstand for around the house, so they have places to be in your company.

Are you getting a newly weaned baby? Find out how much they're handled...IRN's aren't super hands on birds, and if your hoping to harness train etc., having them used to having their wings handled will make a huuuge difference.

They're amazing parrots :) But can be very finicky to work with. Have you got a colour in mind?
 
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IndianRingnecks4me

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Sep 2, 2018
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I'm not overly conscious of any of my fid's sleeping habits. They're free to do their own thing, as am I. It's winter/early spring here at the moment so I will try to ensure they're covered overnight, but their room has full windows on both sides so they can do as they please a bit in the natural light.

There's not a massive range of cages in NZ, so these are our go to:
http://theparrotplace.co.nz/ppkeri/wp-content/uploads/images/products/p-1913-604-2.jpg
The ringnecks & lovebirds have their feed doors cable tied with alternative food and water containers - they're smart creatures!

Nearly as important as the cage, are bongs/a playstand for around the house, so they have places to be in your company.

Are you getting a newly weaned baby? Find out how much they're handled...IRN's aren't super hands on birds, and if your hoping to harness train etc., having them used to having their wings handled will make a huuuge difference.

They're amazing parrots :) But can be very finicky to work with. Have you got a colour in mind?

Hi. I have not decided on a colour but if I can choose it'll be yellow or blue. I haven't even decided which individual ringneck Im gonna get but it will most likely either be a few months/1 year old or a new born. Right now, Im just doing a lot of research.
 

itchyfeet

New member
Nov 1, 2014
1,013
7
Middle Earth
Parrots
Ethyl the cockatiel, Henry & Clarke the IRN's, and Skittles the lovebird (my daughters)
Don't get a new chick. Make sure they're fully weaned. Hand feeding is not worth the risk. Keep an eye on classifieds too - both of mine are amazing, neither is direct from a breeder.
If you have a few to choose from, colour will become a little irrelevant as personality traits make the difference in bonding - but it is one of the things I love about the species. If any more come to us, I'm hoping for a grey or violet. Henry was our first arrival, and he was just so super well trained and socialized his colour become invisible.
 

SilverSage

New member
Sep 14, 2013
5,937
53
Columbus, GA
Parrots
Eclectus, CAG, BH Pionus, Maximilian’s Pionus, Quakers, Indian Ringnecks, Green Cheeked Conures, Black Capped Conures, Cockatiels, Lovebirds, Budgies, Canaries, Diamond Doves, Zebra Finches, Society F
I raise IRNs so what I’ll tell
You is based on what usually leads people to get rid of their IRNs or neglect/abuse them.

1) DO NOT trust a breeder who says their baby is “a bit flighty, just needs a little work.” Those are usually people who have put in the bare minimum work and let me tell you, properly raising an IRN is at least 10x as hard as properly raising a Conure, cockatiel, etc. they require a LOT more one on one time to socialize. Those “flighty” babies left over are the ones that were fed and not much more.

2) if snuggling is important to you, don’t get a ringneck. Seriously don’t. No matter how snuggly the baby is. Adults are very very different.

3) plan for flight. Ringnecks THRIVE when allowed to fly, and many turn to nasty biters if clipped, especially if clipped early. I’m not getting into a clipping vs flying debate, I’m just stating that this species reacts poorly to being deprived of flight as a rule.

4) plan for a long tail. The tails on these guys can be over 12” as adults. Usually I recommend a wide cage with no care to height but with ringnecks you need to think about that tail.

5) if you have your heart set on s certain sex, don’t buy from a breeder who won’t sex the bird before you buy it. Expect to pay for the DNA sexing yourself.

6) don’t be afraid to have a bird shipped to you; getting the right breeder is important part of knowing your bird has been raised right and you aren’t getting a damaged baby or supporting abusive raising practices with your money. BUT, demand a video chat with your bird. Not a recorded video, a live video chat where you can see how the baby interacts. A well socialized baby will be EAGER to step up and interact with a human, but nervous or flighty. Don’t trust a breeder who says nervous or flighty babies are normal.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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IndianRingnecks4me

New member
Sep 2, 2018
6
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  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #12
I raise IRNs so what I’ll tell
You is based on what usually leads people to get rid of their IRNs or neglect/abuse them.

1) DO NOT trust a breeder who says their baby is “a bit flighty, just needs a little work.” Those are usually people who have put in the bare minimum work and let me tell you, properly raising an IRN is at least 10x as hard as properly raising a Conure, cockatiel, etc. they require a LOT more one on one time to socialize. Those “flighty” babies left over are the ones that were fed and not much more.

2) if snuggling is important to you, don’t get a ringneck. Seriously don’t. No matter how snuggly the baby is. Adults are very very different.

3) plan for flight. Ringnecks THRIVE when allowed to fly, and many turn to nasty biters if clipped, especially if clipped early. I’m not getting into a clipping vs flying debate, I’m just stating that this species reacts poorly to being deprived of flight as a rule.

4) plan for a long tail. The tails on these guys can be over 12” as adults. Usually I recommend a wide cage with no care to height but with ringnecks you need to think about that tail.

5) if you have your heart set on s certain sex, don’t buy from a breeder who won’t sex the bird before you buy it. Expect to pay for the DNA sexing yourself.

6) don’t be afraid to have a bird shipped to you; getting the right breeder is important part of knowing your bird has been raised right and you aren’t getting a damaged baby or supporting abusive raising practices with your money. BUT, demand a video chat with your bird. Not a recorded video, a live video chat where you can see how the baby interacts. A well socialized baby will be EAGER to step up and interact with a human, but nervous or flighty. Don’t trust a breeder who says nervous or flighty babies are normal.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ok, but the place where Im gonna get birds, I can go and visit them in person.
 

SilverSage

New member
Sep 14, 2013
5,937
53
Columbus, GA
Parrots
Eclectus, CAG, BH Pionus, Maximilian’s Pionus, Quakers, Indian Ringnecks, Green Cheeked Conures, Black Capped Conures, Cockatiels, Lovebirds, Budgies, Canaries, Diamond Doves, Zebra Finches, Society F
Fantastic! That’s perfect. I highly suggest having them harness train your baby. Irns make great adventure buddies when safely harnessed and the best time to do that is while the baby is still hand feeding.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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