Greenwing Macaws; Male or Female?

Stacy831

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Feb 9, 2021
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Irene: Albino budgie (7 yrs), Ozzy: Lutino budgie (7 yrs), Elma: Green budgie (7 yrs)
Hi! Up until now, with things going so well, I’ve been thinking about getting another bird. I have been looking into getting a greenwing macaw, for I am drawn to their beauty and intelligence. However, I am yet to get one in another year or so.
The one question that has been on my mind lately, is whether I should get a male or a female.
Although every bird is different, I do think it is reasonable to be cautious of other people’s experiences.
From what I’ve heard, male greenwings are notorious for being difficult to take care of as soon as they start developing sexual maturity. I have read many devastating stories about people who went from raising a young male greenwing, as sweet as can be, to having been changed into a completely different bird 10 years later. It is very sad to have raised a baby bird for so long, only for you to become afraid of getting too close. If there is even the slightest bit chance of this happening, I rather go for a female greenwing, for they are known to be calmer. This doesn’t always happen though, I have heard of people who have had male greenwings for so long without this ever happening to them. Every bird has its ups and downs. How do female & male greenwing macaws behave when hormonal? What are some comparisons between males and females?
As for a female greenwing, the only thing I am worried about is the chance of her getting egg bound. Just how often do greenwing macaws or female macaws in general get egg bound? Is there anything I could do to prevent my macaw from wanting to lay eggs? What are the early signs of an egg bound bird? What do you guys think? Is there anyone who has experience with greenwings? All advice is greatly appreciated, and I am open to hearing other people’s opinions. Thank you!


{Extra!} - Hello! I’m new to the parrot forums… In advance, I’ll be asking a lot of questions in the near future. You’ll be seeing a lot of me from here on out, so I might as well introduce myself! My name is Stacy, and I currently have three little budgies named Irene, Ozzy & Elma. (Despite their names, all three of them are confirmed to be male) They were given to me by a wonderful family who could no longer take care of them. I adopted them back in 2018, and they have been a joy ever since! They are one of the many reasons why I’ve come to love birds as much as I do now. I have had them for three years now, and I couldn’t be any happier! :greenyellow:
 

Scott

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Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Welcome Stacy, thanks so much for thorough introduction and kudos for researching before acquiring your dream Greenwing!

My Greenwing was male and adult when purchased. The species generally has excellent reputation for relatively mellow disposition. Mine certainly was; plenty of trademark bluffing but never bit to break skin. Have not heard of significant differences among the sexes, perhaps other members will share anecdotes.

While any female bird can egg bind, the overwhelming majority of cases are with much smaller species. I believe macaws far less susceptible because of size physiology, and they are not as prolific layers as smaller avians.

Irene, Ozzy, and Elma are proven avian goodwill ambassadors! I absolutely share your admiration for the majesty and intelligence of macaws!
 
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Stacy831

Stacy831

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Feb 9, 2021
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Irene: Albino budgie (7 yrs), Ozzy: Lutino budgie (7 yrs), Elma: Green budgie (7 yrs)
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Thank you! I am glad to hear that. :)
I took this into consideration, and I do think that a female would be the better option. If there is a possibility of her becoming egg bound, what do I do in a situation like that? I'd like to know beforehand just in case!
 

Scott

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Aug 21, 2010
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San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Thankfully I have never experienced egg binding by my females, though efforts to prevent are worth a pound of cure!

Best defense is minimize hormonal issues leading to laying. Generally accepted technique is to only touch from the neck-up, avoid excessive cuddling and stimulating by touching back, under wings, belly, and especially vent area. However.... bird susceptibility varies; I handle select birds in excess of the above. (except vent) Over time you'll learn the triggers and what constitutes "too much" touching. Definitely avoid nest boxes and enclosures for single female birds.

First signs of egg binding include swelling near vent, lethargy, difficulty standing, straining to eliminate, etc. Treatment is available, preferably by certified avian vet or equivalent. More details from veterinary source: https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/egg-binding-in-birds
 

SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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Western, Michigan
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Babies are a delight, but they do transition to adults and that transition can be a bit difficult to a true horror story. In the majority of cases it is Humans not prepared or able to understand that baby is now becoming an Adult.

It is important to remember that Mac's have the potential of a very long life of 75+ years and out living their Humans. It is important to consider this reality as most other family members are likely to not have your love of all things Parrot.

Point being, there is great reason to allow an Adult Parrot to 'Choose You.' By allowing this, the adult Parrot, who's personality is now stable and knows what s/he is looking for in a Human will be much better at choose the correct Human! After all, they tune into us on an emotional level, while we are all into appearance!

The result is the relationship is well underway with the Parrot wanting to develop a bond relationship!
 
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Stacy831

Stacy831

New member
Feb 9, 2021
3
0
Parrots
Irene: Albino budgie (7 yrs), Ozzy: Lutino budgie (7 yrs), Elma: Green budgie (7 yrs)
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Babies are a delight, but they do transition to adults and that transition can be a bit difficult to a true horror story. In the majority of cases it is Humans not prepared or able to understand that baby is now becoming an Adult.

It is important to remember that Mac's have the potential of a very long life of 75+ years and out living their Humans. It is important to consider this reality as most other family members are likely to not have your love of all things Parrot.

Point being, there is great reason to allow an Adult Parrot to 'Choose You.' By allowing this, the adult Parrot, who's personality is now stable and knows what s/he is looking for in a Human will be much better at choose the correct Human! After all, they tune into us on an emotional level, while we are all into appearance!

The result is the relationship is well underway with the Parrot wanting to develop a bond relationship!
They sure are! I have no experience in looking after baby macaws, so I'm not quite aware of how to take care of one--But I am willing to learn. As of right now, I am split between the decision of getting a baby or an adult macaw. I am grateful to you for bringing this to my attention, so thank you! I am still set on a greenwing, though.. That won't change. Getting one as an adult will be my #1 choice, with a baby being my last resort.
However I find it difficult, where can I find myself an adult greenwing macaw? I don't have many local shelters near me. Another thing to consider, is the fact that he/she may have behavioral problems or bad habits from previous families. The worst case scenario would be me having to rehome the bird due to serious behavioral issues. Rehoming a bird is something that I want to avoid if I can. Other than that, I see no issues in adopting an older bird. :21:
 

SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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We work with a very select group of parrots: Only Amazons, commonly older, commonly ill, commonly abused and all of them had no want to every trust another Human. To that, we commonly are feeding them medications. Now that is about as deep down a deep dark hole one can start from.

In all cases, they have elected to trust that we are not going to kill them and that we are kind of okay. From there they elect to kind of like us and that grows to a place of common Love for each other.

When one dumps all expectations and except the Parrot for who it is and celebrate every tiny sign of opening up to us by not eating us alive are truly great moments.

It is very important that not that long ago, all Parrots had been wild caught and had very bad experiences with Humans until it arrived in a 'Forever Home.'

The fact that you have more than one Rescue near by is far more that others have. Try being open to Any Mac, and you maybe surprised just what is available in the "I want that Human" group!
 

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