Hormones

jhsatx

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Jul 23, 2016
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We're experiencing our first hormonal bfa.

Last night during head scratching she started pinning, clucking and climbed up and began to pace on my shoulders.
She started the same this morning.

Bird spends a couple hrs in the am and pm out of the cage.
I fear retaliation if she is let out and replaced back in the cage often.

How much time should The bird be caged during this time of yr?

Hormonal check list:
.return to cage immediately
.Beware of feeding warm proteins
.plenty of good sleep
.reduce over stimulating
.
 

MosaicMadness

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Personally, I only let them out if I know I'll be around for awhile. My other "trick" is that I only give treats outside of the cage and on playstands and I'll put new goodies/fresh food in the cage when I want them to go back in. Normally (not 100%) they'll go into their cage after I do this and check out what I've put in there, close door and still have 10 fingers ;)
 

SailBoat

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We're experiencing our first hormonal bfa.

Last night during head scratching she started pinning, clucking and climbed up and began to pace on my shoulders.
She started the same this morning.

Bird spends a couple hrs in the am and pm out of the cage.
I fear retaliation if she is let out and replaced back in the cage often.

How much time should The bird be caged during this time of yr?

Hormonal check list:
.return to cage immediately
.Beware of feeding warm proteins
.plenty of good sleep
.reduce over stimulating
.

Welcome to the Wonderful World of Amazons!

I am assuming that you are in North America and for most Amazons here, this is commonly when they will naturally be more likely to have a Hormonal responses. This based on Amazon's normally being Spring layers. Please understand that Humans can cause an on set of Hormonal responses at different times of year.

Of late, there is a movement toward a natural 'Sun' driven schedule for Parrots. This model has our Parrots wake and sleep schedule matching the Sun's rise and setting during the year. This tends to assure a far more consistent Hormonal Schedule for them. (Source RB's Mom)

Now regarding your Blue-Fronted Amazon Hen: How Old is She and how long has She been with you. Has she been DNA verified female?

What you are describing can also so be 'displaying,' which is also part of a Hormonal Response or just a very happy Amazon. The transition between very happy Amazon and a full Hormonal Response can transition quickly. So, you are wise to be paying far more attention to her.

There are different positions regarding what action to take when your Amazon is transitioning into a Hormonal Response. My belief is that you want them to 'chill-out,' and unwind as quickly as possible! This can be done several ways and returning them to their cage may or may not be possible or advisable! 'If you can' move your Amazon to a perch or any neutral place to allow her to unwind. Some times, you can do little more than let them unwind in place.

During Hormonal Season avoid having your Amazon anywhere you cannot keep an eye on them and Shoulders are one of those places. Also, some Amazons should not be allow on the floor during this time period.

The most important point is: Each Amazon is different and can respond differently to different stimulation. Those Places, Interactions and/or Foods that effect your Amazon should be avoided.
 
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jhsatx

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Judging by the leg band the bird is 14.5.

Didn't have her sexed during her avian vet visit.

Fully flighted and clingy.
Will not perch, currently will not perch.

Has to be within eyeshot when not attached to me.

She flew into our lives as a feral this past June.
 

GaleriaGila

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The Rickeybird, 37-year-old Patagonian Conure
May I just toss in my Patagonian 2 cents? You may already be doing this, but...
I keep the Rbird on a natural light schedule... up with dawn, down with dusk, year around... THEN he's only a little monster rooster sex fiend from July to September). He has his own room, so I can do that easily.
 

SailBoat

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Judging by the leg band the bird is 14.5.

Didn't have her sexed during her avian vet visit.

Fully flighted and clingy.
Will not perch, currently will not perch.

Has to be within eyeshot when not attached to me.

She flew into our lives as a feral this past June.

First, Thank-you, for taking in a feral Amazon!

The life experience helps to explain her want (need) to be clingy. And, her want to be able to see you (and others in the family?). She has lost one family and does not want loss this one!

Assure that her cage is center of the traffic pattern, family activities. This will help comfort her.

Thank-you, for taking her to an Avian Vet. Since your AV is aware that she came flying into your life, it is highly likely that she was checked for a Micro Chip.

So, you are traveling though her first year with you and to say the least, everything is new for everyone regarding your 14.5 year old girl.

I am certain that you have read the 'Understanding Amazon Body Language" Thread as part of the two light blue, Highlighted at the top of the Amazon Forum. That Thread is something you want to continue to read alot to your Amazon until you have the Body Language clearly understood by you and anyone that will be working with her. As you have time read with her the I Love Amazons - ... Thread for additional information.

As part of your yearly AV visit, please have her DNA Sex verified at that time.

Note: Watch for any want to find and go into dark places (nesting locations) as this will clearly work toward developing a Hormonal Response.

As this and the coming years unfold, look forward to a growing relationship with your Amazon. In addition, as time passes she will develop a greater level of comfort, she will become more open to perching and setting by herself.

Amazon's Have More Fun! Enjoy!
 
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davefv92c

Banned
Nov 29, 2016
441
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sailboat, this unwinding thing is this the few times a day Lilly will be hanging upside down making all kinds of racket and a flapping away with her wings, she also does this hanging upside down off the sides of the cage is this hormones? dang and all along I just thought she was taking a trip to the jungle in her mind.lol
 

SailBoat

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sailboat, this unwinding thing is this the few times a day Lilly will be hanging upside down making all kinds of racket and a flapping away with her wings, she also does this hanging upside down off the sides of the cage is this hormones? dang and all along I just thought she was taking a trip to the jungle in her mind.lol

There is a World of differences between an Amazon having 'Fun' and an Amazon that is spinning out-of-control, driven by the effects of Raging Hormones.

You are defining an Amazon just having Fun!

An Amazon in Full 'Big Bird' Presentation, Wings out at the side, head feathers fully raised, Eyes flashing orange, Tail Feathers fully spread, body swaying!!! WARNING WARNING WARNING - Do Not Insert or leave close by anything that your valve!!!! Back away from this Amazon!!! You may need to place something between you and this Amazon!!!

You can watch them transition into this Crazed State. When working with an Amazon that I do not know, I have a towel close at hand to place between me and that Amazons if it spins-up!!!

Never attempt to face-down, shout-down or any other 'I'm the Boss here' thing!!! You will only ramp that Amazon up even more!!!

Move Away and allow time to do its thing. Its all chemically driven and the more 'the stupid Human' ramps it up, the Amazon will ramp up faster!!! It is a loss - loss reality!!!!
 

davefv92c

Banned
Nov 29, 2016
441
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never seen her in the bigbird mode, she seems rather easy going to me, but I would not stick my hand in her house while she is going through this playing thing either, I likes my fingers. lol
 
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jhsatx

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Update

LaLa has recovered!

After a couple+ months of convulsing and clucking, LaLa has returned.
She has morphed into a sweeter bird too.

She is starting to open up to other family members too.

The wife had a breakthrough the other day when LaLa crawled on down the couch and onto her for cuddle/scratching session.

Those in the know will attest to how much of a motivator food is, and we have used this to our advantage.

Many thanks to the contributors!
 

LordTriggs

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Rio (Yellow sided conure) sadly no longer with us
I've come to the conclusion Amazons are more akin to flying compost heaps considering the amount of food they inhale!

Sounds good that she's being friendly now and even opening up more. Clearly you have passed her test

now have all food you want for yourself under lock and key, in a different state from your home preferably!
 
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jhsatx

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Dirty bird has returned, 5 wks early this year I might add.

Noticed the recliner seems to trigger ole humpy, hope that helps someone.

Anyone else have a bird that gets humpy at specific moments?
 

SailBoat

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It all depends on where in this Huge World you are as to when an Adult Amazon will naturally begin an official Hormonal Season. The center in North America tends to be the 23 of December with a variation of up to six to eight weeks either side of the center.

Each year it will vary depending on the number of cloudy days and/or the amount of proper sleep the Parrot receives each day.

Welcome to the Wonderful World of Amazons!

To be honest, having no problem with an Amazon enjoy his or herself, I truly do not care about it. Look the other way and in general pay no attention! That is nothing compared to an Amazon chemically wound tight and coming loose with your body parts anywhere close to that Amazon! We find it advisable to have distractions near by: A Couple of Dancing Towels or a Blocking Bed Pillow(s), placing either or all between you and the Amazon. Just let them cool down and all will be fine again, shortly! Just simply move away.

Only idiots try to mix-it-up with a fully Hormonal Amazon, in full-attack-mode. Normally, this ends-up with the idiot in the emergency room!
 
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jhsatx

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Thanks for the info.

She isn't violent during the annual curse , floppy and clucky best describes the out of control behavior we've experienced.

It's nice to know the behavior can be ignored without action.

My protocol was to transfer to the cage during these episodes.
 
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jhsatx

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Well,,, last fall past without the curse and this spring also. Unfortunately :green: the humpster has returned, and with a vengeance. We were able to make it over a year without horrormones. I think she?s making up for lost time.

Some research indicated the stress of hormone surges is one of the reasons for the shorten life span of companion birds.
We aren?t seasoned enough to know if that?s true.

New things we are trying to suppress:

Leaving the room when she looses control,(we continue to monitor out of eyesight) until episode is over.
Relocating chew toys from cage.
Eliminating free feeding.
Extra exercise.

Please post any tips that help to shorten the duration of the curse with your birds.
 

wrench13

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My litany for my little Amazon Salty when the 'mones hit.

  • No soft warm mushy foods, like sweet taters, yams
  • I used a 12 on 12 off sleep schedule
  • no touching anywhere except head and neck - nowhere else!
  • no dark recesses in the cage or where he is out and about
  • Zero or very low sugar intake, like fruits, veggies like corn, and no or low sugar pellets
  • Lots of exercise and out of cage time (for playing and destroying toys)
  • No access to any kind of nesting materials like shredded paper or others
  • Ignore the humping and clucking, nothing you can do about them

Hope these help!
 

AmyMyBlueFront

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Jonesy a Goffins 'Too who had to be rehomed :-(

And a Normal Grey Cockatiel named BB who came home with me on 5/20/2016.
sailboat, this unwinding thing is this the few times a day Lilly will be hanging upside down making all kinds of racket and a flapping away with her wings, she also does this hanging upside down off the sides of the cage is this hormones? dang and all along I just thought she was taking a trip to the jungle in her mind.lol

Amy,my 31y.o. blue front ( had HIM since he was 4 months old,he picked me to go home with) does the "hang upside down,squawk/talk/flap flap" thing a lot. It's a big game to him! At times in the am I go to get his food/water/treat bowls looking for him (usually sits on a perch by his brekky bowl) only to find him hanging upside down from his roof,looking at me goofy. He also does this from the side of his mansion,while trying to swoon BB,his next door neighbor in his condo ( THAT is an entirely differnt story :rolleyes:)
Amy doesn't fly,never has,so I've been giving him flapflap lessons.He sits on his carry-me-around perch as I tell him "ok,on three,flapflap" and I count,then bring the perch down quickly but hold on to it,and he spreads his arms and flaps. I do this to strengthening his muscles. We do this a dozen times or so. Then he just turns upside down on the perch,looks at me and says "huh?huh?" He's never gonna fly..goofy bird.

As far as the 'mones go..danger danger! Usually he is a sweet heart but he turns into a terror/ doc jekyl/mr hyde and he stays put in his mansion 'til he chills out! I,ve had flesh RIPPED from my arm/hand/face over the years and I ain't gonna loose no 'mo!


Jim
 
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jhsatx

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Jul 23, 2016
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  • No soft warm mushy foods, like sweet taters, yams
  • I used a 12 on 12 off sleep schedule
  • no touching anywhere except head and neck - nowhere else!
  • no dark recesses in the cage or where he is out and about
  • Zero or very low sugar intake, like fruits, veggies like corn, and no or low sugar pellets
  • Lots of exercise and out of cage time (for playing and destroying toys)
  • No access to any kind of nesting materials like shredded paper or others
  • Ignore the humping and clucking, nothing you can do about them

Hope these help![/QUOTE]

Great list.

My thought was to remove the chew/shredding toys from the cage to avoid nesting associations.
You?re removing shredding toys completely?
I was thinking shredding would help burn off the imbalance?
Thanks for the list!
 

SailBoat

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Mid-late December 2020 our DYH Amazon pulled early into Hormone Season. At that point, we did not know that he was going to push all bounders as it was late May 2021, when flow slowed and stopped. That set the all time recorder for length of a season across all of the Amazons that had owned our home.

His primary triggers turned-out to be: Sleep, followed by Sugar (fruit), which was tiny compared to Sleep! I truly believe that each Amazon is effected differently and that it is a process of searching item by item until you find the magic trigger for your Amazon, THIS YEAR! I strongly recommend that you start with SLEEP and then Sugar. It is important to understand that when getting advise from Snobs that we automatically eliminate common items because we had traveled this road for decades.

SLEEP: A truly silent, dark home!
 
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jhsatx

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We started having bird time in our room a month or so ago before bedtime.
It may have been a trigger for our current situation.

A lot to learn with birds.
 

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