How often to clean cage?

TomL

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Jul 15, 2021
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I have one canary bird currently, I'm waiting for a local breeder to contact me on when a companion may be available. The other one died/was killed by an animal breaking into a cage. He is skittish now, every time I put in feed or water he acts like he is being threatened, an effect of what happened before.

How often are cages normally cleaned? Does traditional music help songbirds and canaries? How sensitive are their eyes and ears?
 

Scott

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Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Sorry to know one of the companions passed violently, your canary is justifiably skittish and wary. Servicing food and water a mandatory function, you'll want to earn his trust. Do you plan to handle the eventual pair?

Cleaning the cage a multi-step process. Changing the paper (or other material) collecting waste every day or two, more frequently if feeding fresh veggies and fruits. Spot cleaning droppings from other areas as desired. Toys can be washed for freshness periodically depending on level of use. Heavy cleaning of perches and cage structure depends on level of contamination. I'd imagine less frequently for canaries, more often for messy larger species.

Birds extremely visual and responsive to sound. For entertainment many folks use TV, computer monitors, radios, or Alexa-type devices for stimulation.
 
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TomL

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I wonder what the rationale is for frequent cage cleaning as if we are cleaning up after dogs when we walk them outside, required to retrieve all offal in a bag for sanitary reasons? As far as I have seen the bird's poop is dry, does not pose any threat, so I don't see any reason for excessive concerns which can disturb the birds.
 

Scott

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Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
While bird droppings far less odious and transferable than dog waste, all feces/urates harbor bacteria. The microscopic world is teeming with organisms invisible to the naked eye. Flies and other vermin live to transfer eliminated material from bottom of cage to food supply, water, toys, etc.

You asked for opinion and I shared, please define responsible cage cleaning.
 

Laurasea

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Cleaning daily food and water dishes, and perches and toys. Changing papers daily or every couple of days.
Pests will find you, bugs, Flys, roaches, mice.

And as mentioned, mold, fungus , bacteria will flourish. Birds are sensitive to mold and fungus. Bacteria will airesolize, become airborne from dried feces, as do mold spores. That can also cause problems to your health.

Birds are messy, and they poop many times a day.
 

T00tsyd

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May 8, 2017
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Green cheek conure - Sydney (Syd) Hatched 2/2017
I clean Syd's day cage every evening after he goes to bed in his sleep cage. By that I mean changing paper, emptying and washing all food dishes and wiping with wet cloth and appropriate disinfectant perches, bars, floor etc. Every couple of weeks I dismantle it completely, to get to all the places that the regular clean cannot reach and use a steamer on it, wash toys that need it. Syd likes change so I move his set up around and change in some of the toys every couple of days. Perhaps I'm fussy but I like a cage that looks good and is clean.
I love the way he looks at a new set up and spends time finding his way around. It keeps him interested and his cage becomes an adventure.
 
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TomL

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Thanks for the feedback and I really appreciate it. Based on the current cage, space around it, minimal amounts of offal I don't see any reason to disturb my little friend who lost his companion who was much more kinetic, vigorous and copious in consumption and residue. I just don't see a rational basis for cleaning up after a small canary who eats little and excretes small amounts.
 

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