How to know the sex of my Senegal Parrots

Douz

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Sep 21, 2021
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Parrots
Senegal
Hello everyone,

Greetings from Africa.
I have two question to ask wonderful people in the forum.

1. I bought 2 Senegal parrot a month ago and I got another one two days ago, but when I brought in the new one into the cage I house the previous two, I notice the new one is a bit stubborn and attacks the other two when they go new him/her especially if the attempt eating from the bowl. And he/she eats a lot, and practically did not allow others to eat and will finish the food that belongs to three of them. One of the previous is always in panic he/she avoids him/her totally and will never new the food bowl... This is getting me worried and I like to keep all of them in one cage.

2. Is there a way I can know the sex of the three of them because I don't know and I don't believe what the seller told me.

Thank you in advance for your help.
 

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wrench13

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Senegals, like most parrots are not sexually dimorphic, meaning there is no physical difference between the sexes (aka monomorphic), The only way to tell is to have a blood test done. This can be done with a shed feather or from a drop of blood from a nail or other. Not an expensive test to have done, maybe $20-25 at your vets.
 

MrLaurieKeats

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As much as you may like to keep all three birds in one cage, it seems that the new addition has changed things considerably. It would be best if you provide separate housing if they are not compatible, for the safety of your birds.
 
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Douz

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Sep 21, 2021
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Senegal
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Senegals, like most parrots are not sexually dimorphic, meaning there is no physical difference between the sexes (aka monomorphic), The only way to tell is to have a blood test done. This can be done with a shed feather or from a drop of blood from a nail or other. Not an expensive test to have done, maybe $20-25 at your vets.
Ok thank you I will consider that.
 
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Douz

New member
Sep 21, 2021
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Senegal
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As much as you may like to keep all three birds in one cage, it seems that the new addition has changed things considerably. It would be best if you provide separate housing if they are not compatible, for the safety of your birds.
Thank you... I will observe them for a day more, if they will tag along along and if they did not I will separate them.
 

Skarila

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Previous owned:
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✻RIP - 28 YO Zeleni the mischievous IRN
✻RIP -Sunny the budgie
Senegals, like most parrots are not sexually dimorphic, meaning there is no physical difference between the sexes (aka monomorphic), The only way to tell is to have a blood test done. This can be done with a shed feather or from a drop of blood from a nail or other. Not an expensive test to have done, maybe $20-25 at your vets.
I need to correct here - they do very slight physical differences in sexes. If I know something, it's sennies.

The males will generally have a bigger head than the female. Their vest is very often much higher compared to the females (the V part). the V part in females will often go much lower on the belly.

Another mark could be their underfluffs (the butt feathers). In males it is almost always fully yellow, while in females there are always at least a few greens, among the yellows. However this is not always a rule, but it could be a very good guess of the sexes. This is very true for most of the sennies, but ofcourse not always. I've seen males who have the orange V quite low, like a female, but their butt fully yellow, and proven to be a male via DNA. But if you want to be 100% sure, just go for a DNA test if possible.

Senegals are quite solitary parrots, they work wonderfuly as single parrots. Very, very often they hate other species, they do not tolerate well even their own species. The chance of an adult senegal (after years) to accept another species, OR even their own is very slim - often they will not accept the other bird. They could be tolerant (depends on the bird), but often they will go for the blood if their space has been invaded. If you want a pair of sennies, it's best to get them when they are babies, much higher chance they will like each other. Now if you have 2 sennies that are bonded, or like each other, adding a 3rd was a really big mistake. In the wild, their flocks are very "rare", as in the bonded pairs keep distance from the others. They do make a flock, but the pairs have a rather big distance from each other. They are the opposite of conure parrots who 10 of them would just snuggle next to each other, making a huge ball/line of fluff.

Please separate the sennies, the new one into their own cage. When they have the chance, they will kill. they are really vicious parrots when agitated.
 
OP
D

Douz

New member
Sep 21, 2021
4
0
Parrots
Senegal
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
I need to correct here - they do very slight physical differences in sexes. If I know something, it's sennies.

The males will generally have a bigger head than the female. Their vest is very often much higher compared to the females (the V part). the V part in females will often go much lower on the belly.

Another mark could be their underfluffs (the butt feathers). In males it is almost always fully yellow, while in females there are always at least a few greens, among the yellows. However this is not always a rule, but it could be a very good guess of the sexes. This is very true for most of the sennies, but ofcourse not always. I've seen males who have the orange V quite low, like a female, but their butt fully yellow, and proven to be a male via DNA. But if you want to be 100% sure, just go for a DNA test if possible.

Senegals are quite solitary parrots, they work wonderfuly as single parrots. Very, very often they hate other species, they do not tolerate well even their own species. The chance of an adult senegal (after years) to accept another species, OR even their own is very slim - often they will not accept the other bird. They could be tolerant (depends on the bird), but often they will go for the blood if their space has been invaded. If you want a pair of sennies, it's best to get them when they are babies, much higher chance they will like each other. Now if you have 2 sennies that are bonded, or like each other, adding a 3rd was a really big mistake. In the wild, their flocks are very "rare", as in the bonded pairs keep distance from the others. They do make a flock, but the pairs have a rather big distance from each other. They are the opposite of conure parrots who 10 of them would just snuggle next to each other, making a huge ball/line of fluff.

Please separate the sennies, the new one into their own cage. When they have the chance, they will kill. they are really vicious parrots when agitated.
Oh. Thank you for this. I really appreciate. I will separate the new one from the other two immediately.
 

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