I'm new to the forum, and even newer to posting.

Melody

New member
Dec 21, 2019
5
0
Hi, I'm fairly new here, and VERY NEW at posting. I know how to reply - I've just never started a post or thread myself.

I have loved birds all my life. I started with taking in injured wild birds as a young girl and doctoring them back to health. I don't know of a time when I was a kid that I didn't have at least one bird. I grew up in an actual village (yes, we really do have those in the U.S.), so while I grew up "in town", to a lot of people, I grew up "out in the sticks".

When I was growing up, people didn't know the things about parrots that they know now. If people had birds, they were kept in cages, and you were told to keep your fingers away. Knowing what I know now, it just makes me cry for all the imprisoned birds who were taught a couple words as party tricks. We always had wild birds that could talk. Crows (black birds, Ravens) could repeat words, and we're known to be very smart. But the kind that were kept in cages were never considered to be that intelligent. I was always the weirdo who thought they were.

As my kids were growing up, we ALWAYS had various kinds of birds, and my kids knew they could talk, and sing songs or whistle songs. But even then, we were still taught that birds stayed in cages - for their own safety.

Now I am a grandmother, and 9 months ago I became a widow. I have been watching YouTube videos of various birds for the last couple years, after my husband became enthralled with our neighbor's Moluccan. My husband DIDN'T KNOW about birds (we'd only been married 5 years) so I was really excited to teach him. We started discussing getting one, but then he got sick. After he died, I just kept watching videos. Then I started talking to my youngest (she's 32) about getting a bird. I also had become very familiar with Kelly & Pebble, and love them both to pieces. Recently, Kelly put out a video talking about "the Parrot Crisis", and saying "adopt - don't shop". Well, ALL of my birds were adopted, I'd never bought one. And there was no need for rescues back then. I started looking into it, and found that it really IS a problem. So, I decided that while I might look at birds in a store, I wouldn't look to buy, just to learn.

As we've learned so much about these beautiful creatures, we've become aware of how traumatizing it is to them to be re-homed. If you look at Pebble, you can see what that has done to her. These amazing creatures average from a 2-3 year old to a 5 year old human emotionally. I have a 5 year old granddaughter. And I have a brand new 5 1/2 year old granddaughter who has been in the foster care system since birth. I see what the re-homing changes have done to that little one. And she speaks our language. So I couldn't purposely do that to a bird. I know things happen in life that we don't expect and can't help. But, for me to get a BABY parrot - of ANY type - would be uncaring and irresponsible on my part! We KNOW how long THEY live. I figure, that given my parent's lifespan and health issues, compared to my own healthier choices, I probably can plan on another 23 years of active life. That is still way too short for a long-lived baby parrot! But, if I were to take in a bird that had to be re-homed, and NOT a larger bird, which I'd LOVE right now (and always wanted), that would be the most responsible way for me to go. I had been looking at Caiques and Quakers because of the size. Conures had been mentioned, but I live in a 55+ community that just got new owners, and the old owner was cool with the cockatoo - the new owners didn't know about her!

So, do you think I'm looking at this the right way? Or should I just leave the birds to younger people?
Thank you.
 

texsize

Supporting Member
Oct 23, 2015
2,712
Media
2
502
so-cal
Parrots
1 YNA (Bingo)
1 OWA (Plumas R.I.P.)
1 RLA (Pacho R.I.P.)
2 GCA(Luna,Merlin) The Twins
1 Congo AG (Bella)
5 Cockatiels
It sounds like you would be able to give a bird a wonderful home and lots of love.
So many things in your post brings memories back to me.
As I was growing up and in grammar school we had a neighbor that inherited a Macaw. I don't remember the species for sure but it was either a green wing or scarlet Macaw.
This poor thing was in a small dome cage just a little bit bigger than it was.
I feel so terrible about that, I wish I had a time machine to go back and tell them how cruel it is. If I recall correctly the woman of the house was a chain smoker to boot.

We once were able to nurse a baby Robin back to health and release it into the wild but it was just that once that we had a bird as kids.

Welcome to P.F.
 

GaleriaGila

Supporting Member
May 14, 2016
14,212
4,258
Cleveland area
Parrots
The Rickeybird, 37-year-old Patagonian Conure
Gee, I'd love to have you as a neighbor! And I am glad to have you as a Forums-Neighbor, for sure!
I think you'll search your good heart and make the right decisions, I really do.
And it'll be a pleasure to share your continued journey.


9lhIlM0.jpg
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 21, 2010
32,134
6,144
San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Welcome to the forums Melody, thanks for a lovely introduction! Please accept my deepest condolences for the loss of your husband.

You have astounding insight and compassion, prerequisites for "parronthood." Twenty plus years is a long while, sufficient horizon to contemplate a bird of any age. Impossible to "age match" for the sunsetting of two lives given infinite variables.

Deep respect for considering older re-homed or serially adopted parrots. So many are awaiting a stable home with loving parront. I am certain whatever you choose will be mutually rewarding!
 

Jen5200

Well-known member
Mar 27, 2017
1,873
Media
23
Albums
2
193
Washington State
Parrots
Baby - Sun Conure;
Tango - GCC;
Bindi - Sun Conure;
Stanley - Pineapple GCC;
Screamer “Scree� - Cockatiel;
Tee - Pineapple GCC; Jimmy - Cockatiel
Welcome to you! I love the way you are thinking about this and putting the bird’s needs first :). I think you’d be a great home for an older parrot, or a smaller and not as long-lived parrot. I have conures and cockatiels - 4 rehomed to me and 2 from the rescue that I volunteer at. Have you ever considered volunteering at a rescue? It is a great way to connect with the bird community and be in contact with birds that may need a home. I also get lots of contact with larger birds at the rescue, and have smaller birds at home.... we have cockatoos at the rescue that are over 60 years old (the oldest pair are in their 70’s!).
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
341
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
Hi, I'm fairly new here, and VERY NEW at posting. I know how to reply - I've just never started a post or thread myself.

I have loved birds all my life. I started with taking in injured wild birds as a young girl and doctoring them back to health. I don't know of a time when I was a kid that I didn't have at least one bird. I grew up in an actual village (yes, we really do have those in the U.S.), so while I grew up "in town", to a lot of people, I grew up "out in the sticks".

When I was growing up, people didn't know the things about parrots that they know now. If people had birds, they were kept in cages, and you were told to keep your fingers away. Knowing what I know now, it just makes me cry for all the imprisoned birds who were taught a couple words as party tricks. We always had wild birds that could talk. Crows (black birds, Ravens) could repeat words, and we're known to be very smart. But the kind that were kept in cages were never considered to be that intelligent. I was always the weirdo who thought they were.

As my kids were growing up, we ALWAYS had various kinds of birds, and my kids knew they could talk, and sing songs or whistle songs. But even then, we were still taught that birds stayed in cages - for their own safety.

Now I am a grandmother, and 9 months ago I became a widow. I have been watching YouTube videos of various birds for the last couple years, after my husband became enthralled with our neighbor's Moluccan. My husband DIDN'T KNOW about birds (we'd only been married 5 years) so I was really excited to teach him. We started discussing getting one, but then he got sick. After he died, I just kept watching videos. Then I started talking to my youngest (she's 32) about getting a bird. I also had become very familiar with Kelly & Pebble, and love them both to pieces. Recently, Kelly put out a video talking about "the Parrot Crisis", and saying "adopt - don't shop". Well, ALL of my birds were adopted, I'd never bought one. And there was no need for rescues back then. I started looking into it, and found that it really IS a problem. So, I decided that while I might look at birds in a store, I wouldn't look to buy, just to learn.

As we've learned so much about these beautiful creatures, we've become aware of how traumatizing it is to them to be re-homed. If you look at Pebble, you can see what that has done to her. These amazing creatures average from a 2-3 year old to a 5 year old human emotionally. I have a 5 year old granddaughter. And I have a brand new 5 1/2 year old granddaughter who has been in the foster care system since birth. I see what the re-homing changes have done to that little one. And she speaks our language. So I couldn't purposely do that to a bird. I know things happen in life that we don't expect and can't help. But, for me to get a BABY parrot - of ANY type - would be uncaring and irresponsible on my part! We KNOW how long THEY live. I figure, that given my parent's lifespan and health issues, compared to my own healthier choices, I probably can plan on another 23 years of active life. That is still way too short for a long-lived baby parrot! But, if I were to take in a bird that had to be re-homed, and NOT a larger bird, which I'd LOVE right now (and always wanted), that would be the most responsible way for me to go. I had been looking at Caiques and Quakers because of the size. Conures had been mentioned, but I live in a 55+ community that just got new owners, and the old owner was cool with the cockatoo - the new owners didn't know about her!

So, do you think I'm looking at this the right way? Or should I just leave the birds to younger people?
Thank you.

I would leave cockatoos to younger people just because they are SO active and live such a long time (unless you get an older one---mine came from a woman in her 50s who found that she could no longer keep up due to health concerns and sheer exhaustion)...Either way, they are a handful and a half as far as birds are concerned and definitely not for anyone living in a rental situation and are very, VERY needy. That is not to say that older people can't have them or that they are bad, but they are especially challenging and sensitive.

If you have the stamina, health and energy to deal with a toddler then you can get a bird--- I just wouldn't get a baby that is going to live a super long time because there is always trauma there when homes have to shift. If you think you can commit to 20 years or even 10 (with an older bird who lives to about 20 or something) then that is something very doable (as long as you are committed to doing what has to be done)

I commend you for thinking about the trauma that re-homing causes for these special animals and for recognizing their extreme intelligence.
 
Last edited:

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
10,253
2,673
USA
Parrots
Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
There are so many parrots in need! Yes please give one a home!!

There are so many in craigslist, and other places listed needing new homes. The vast majority of them never go to a parrot rescue. But in my book they are still rescues.

There hundreds of Quakers listed. These very smart social parrots , self destruct and become screaming pluckers when their needs aren't met. I love me some Quakers as you see I have three, one a rescue, one a rehome, and one I got from the breeder. Even a happy Quaker can be loud. But as most are good talkers you can redirect them to talking, but not always.

Hope we here back from you!
 

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