My me time & my parrots time

eman

Member
Jul 10, 2021
51
61
Kuwait
Parrots
Rainbow Lories: Mathew & Mia 🤍
Hello,
Some of my family members have fear of birds and animals in general. I got my first parrot “Mathew” in May when he was two months. Back then, he was a quiet parrot and didn't fly to places he didn't know, or to any of my family members. Thus, I was allowed to freely move at home with him. It was perfect for me as I can work and be with my family and my parrot all at one time. As he grew older he got used to the home and everyone in, so he started flying everywhere. Thus, he's not allowed out of the room anymore, as I found myself stuck with him. I train him for 15min, then he loses concentration. I used to stay with him in the same room and work after training. Although the room is prepared for him to play, he clung to me. Because of this, I wasn't either able to work or to do something useful. I had less time to spend with my family and myself. I decided to get him a mate so that they entertain each other in the room without me being in. However, this didn't solve the problem. I no longer have the training time, for I'm not able to train them together nor separately as they always want each other. When I go to work, I leave them in the room; and as I come back, I find them either only standing on one perch or back in the cage. I found out that they don't entertain themselves. The cleaning increased, I barely have time with my family, and I no longer have my "me time". I'm frustrated, as I feel that my life is kind of a mess. I feel guilty if I left them alone, if I didn't spend time with my family, and if I didn't do my work and have my "me time". I really don't know what to do! My family is telling me to give the two birds to another breeder. I can't imagine my life without Mathew, but maybe without the new parrot; I love her " the new parrot", but I'm not attached to her as it's been only two weeks since I got her and didn't name her yet.
Thank you in advance.
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
163
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
Welcome and please stick around!

Real-talk: In many ways, a parrot is a lot like a human toddler that never grows up- this is even more true for some species but applies in general (they need a TON from us, but we can also spoil them---they will ALWAYS require way more attention than a cat or dog etc though) . I wish more people considered this when purchasing agreeable little babies. You can teach some independence, but you have to understand that this is a flock animal in a totally unnatural environment with the intelligence of a 3-5 year old child. Babies are absolutely always chill, compared to adults or adolescents. You do not want to confuse your bird by making him think you are his mate (but even if you do your best to avoid this, it is their instinct). No matter what, you and family are his flock. I am very concerned that your family does not sound invested, as having a parrot of any sort takes a whole household commitment. ANY baby you find will follow the same path this one did (just like teens and adults form opinions and preferences and have hormones that babies do not).

Some things to consider-
1.a parrot should be in the most active part of the home (bedrooms etc for permanent caging unless sleep related= not good)
2.Socialization- a bird is a much more intense commitment than any other pet I can think of and requires full family commitment and involvement (socially, behaviorally, safety-wise etc). Your family needs to be consistent in behaviorally appropriate responses to undesired behavior, but please note: these are not the same as people would assume might work with a dog or cat. Yelling at a parrot, scaring it, forcing interaction or physically "punishing" NEVER work...will only make it worse.
3. SLEEP-10 hours minimum on a schedule for your species (on a schedule)--- sleep regulates immune health, hormones, behaviors etc-- this is essential.
4. NO SEXUAL BEHAVIORS WITH THE BIRD- Pet ONLY on the head and neck (anything else is foreplay/sex and sends the wrong message), no snuggle huts, tents or access to shadowy spaces (nesting birds use these when making babies- they do not need a special sleep space).
5. Teaching routines and cue- words and not REWARDING bad behavior by running into the room etc etc. When you leave, your bird is not feeling safe unless independence etc has been taught gradually (again, safety in numbers). If you are leaving, try using a phrase for short departures, vs longer departures (I say: going to the store for under 3 and going to work for 4-7). If you are around and your bird is out, don't expect a lot of me time...this is just how they are. YOU CAN work on station training, which would prevent him from constantly flying after you to SOME degree, but it takes time and consistency and a knowledge of parrot behavior...don't expect it to fully eliminate the natural desire and importance of flying.
6. Learn about ABA-- applied behavior analysis-- this will help you learn what you are doing to encourage/reinforce undesirable behavior-- keeping in mind that parrots are needy and very very social/smart.
7. Expect your bird to be a part of household interaction when you are home. You should work on station training but also consider having a play-stand or perch per room so that your bird can be around people without having to fly onto them. They DO need to learn that they can spend some time alone, but keep interaction high.
8. Talk to them from other rooms so that they know where you are-- this is why they call out in the wild. DO NOT respond if they are making a terrible screaming sound, or you will make it more likely that they repeat that sound for a response. DO try to talk to them BEFORE the screaming starts and respond to noises that you prefer other than screaming.
9. They NEED to feel included--- with at least a few hours of active interaction and then a few hours of indirect interaction daily. For instance, I play with mine actively for a few hours a day, but she is station trained to hang out on a perch in the room or on her cage top if I am home and we are not playing (wings are not clipped)--- NOTE: you still must supervise, no matter how much you think you can trust them. So, indirect interaction would be you and your parrot within eye-shot while you worked on the computer. Direct would be dancing and singing with your parrot or playing a game where you give treats or train. I hope that makes sense? Sorry this is getting long...ugh I suck at brevity.
10. You CAN cage your bird when you are home from time-to-time (and should, so they learn a bit of independence) but be prepared to WAIT OUT the screaming and try to prevent it by starting caged periods low/short and only returning to a quiet bird.

This is a great website and I wish you luck! Please stick around because there are so many bits of good advice here!
 
Last edited:

fiddlejen

Supporting Member
Mar 28, 2019
1,156
Media
11
753
New England
Parrots
Sunny the Sun Conure (sept '18, gotcha 3/'19). Mr Jefferson Budgie & Mrs Calliope Budgie (albino) (nov'18 & jan'19). Summer 2021 Baby Budgies: Riker (Green); Patchouli, Keye, & Tiny (blue greywings).
It sounds like it might be wise to re-home the second bird quickly, before you both grow too attached, if that is a possiblity.

Then regarding the first bird (or both if you keep them both - but in your case I think your best chance is if you indeed keep the first and re-home the second to a good home) - FIRST read over Noodles' post above. Several times, and memorize it. ... Then a suggestion (or possibly 2-in-1). You have not mentioned the cage situation. (Also I see a pic of your bird but you didn't mention the kind so I'm Guessing it's medium-sized?) Bird needs big large cage with lots of toys. Lots of variety of perches. You could even string rope perches around in your bird room. This will give your bird other things to do and play with besides you.

You also need a nice-sized cage for the bird out where the action is happening. Then bird can hang out with the family but Not be free to fly around with them. They can interact while bird is safely inside cage in the family area -- bird safe from family and family safe from bird, and you there to supervise.

Do lots of reading here on the forum & learn birdie body language, how to interact, Target Training and bite pressure training. Then you can guide your family's interactions with the bird, you can all learn to how to treat the bird well and have positive interactions together.
 
OP
eman

eman

Member
Jul 10, 2021
51
61
Kuwait
Parrots
Rainbow Lories: Mathew & Mia 🤍
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #4
Welcome and please stick around!

Real-talk: In many ways, a parrot is a lot like a human toddler that never grows up- this is even more true for some species but applies in general (they need a TON from us, but we can also spoil them---they will ALWAYS require way more attention than a cat or dog etc though) . I wish more people considered this when purchasing agreeable little babies. You can teach some independence, but you have to understand that this is a flock animal in a totally unnatural environment with the intelligence of a 3-5 year old child. Babies are absolutely always chill, compared to adults or adolescents. You do not want to confuse your bird by making him think you are his mate (but even if you do your best to avoid this, it is their instinct). No matter what, you and family are his flock. I am very concerned that your family does not sound invested, as having a parrot of any sort takes a whole household commitment. ANY baby you find will follow the same path this one did (just like teens and adults form opinions and preferences and have hormones that babies do not).

Some things to consider-
1.a parrot should be in the most active part of the home (bedrooms etc for permanent caging unless sleep related= not good)
2.Socialization- a bird is a much more intense commitment than any other pet I can think of and requires full family commitment and involvement (socially, behaviorally, safety-wise etc). Your family needs to be consistent in behaviorally appropriate responses to undesired behavior, but please note: these are not the same as people would assume might work with a dog or cat. Yelling at a parrot, scaring it, forcing interaction or physically "punishing" NEVER work...will only make it worse.
3. SLEEP-10 hours minimum on a schedule for your species (on a schedule)--- sleep regulates immune health, hormones, behaviors etc-- this is essential.
4. NO SEXUAL BEHAVIORS WITH THE BIRD- Pet ONLY on the head and neck (anything else is foreplay/sex and sends the wrong message), no snuggle huts, tents or access to shadowy spaces (nesting birds use these when making babies- they do not need a special sleep space).
5. Teaching routines and cue- words and not REWARDING bad behavior by running into the room etc etc. When you leave, your bird is not feeling safe unless independence etc has been taught gradually (again, safety in numbers). If you are leaving, try using a phrase for short departures, vs longer departures (I say: going to the store for under 3 and going to work for 4-7). If you are around and your bird is out, don't expect a lot of me time...this is just how they are. YOU CAN work on station training, which would prevent him from constantly flying after you to SOME degree, but it takes time and consistency and a knowledge of parrot behavior...don't expect it to fully eliminate the natural desire and importance of flying.
6. Learn about ABA-- applied behavior analysis-- this will help you learn what you are doing to encourage/reinforce undesirable behavior-- keeping in mind that parrots are needy and very very social/smart.
7. Expect your bird to be a part of household interaction when you are home. You should work on station training but also consider having a play-stand or perch per room so that your bird can be around people without having to fly onto them. They DO need to learn that they can spend some time alone, but keep interaction high.
8. Talk to them from other rooms so that they know where you are-- this is why they call out in the wild. DO NOT respond if they are making a terrible screaming sound, or you will make it more likely that they repeat that sound for a response. DO try to talk to them BEFORE the screaming starts and respond to noises that you prefer other than screaming.
9. They NEED to feel included--- with at least a few hours of active interaction and then a few hours of indirect interaction daily. For instance, I play with mine actively for a few hours a day, but she is station trained to hang out on a perch in the room or on her cage top if I am home and we are not playing (wings are not clipped)--- NOTE: you still must supervise, no matter how much you think you can trust them. So, indirect interaction would be you and your parrot within eye-shot while you worked on the computer. Direct would be dancing and singing with your parrot or playing a game where you give treats or train. I hope that makes sense? Sorry this is getting long...ugh I suck at brevity.
10. You CAN cage your bird when you are home from time-to-time (and should, so they learn a bit of independence) but be prepared to WAIT OUT the screaming and try to prevent it by starting caged periods low/short and only returning to a quiet bird.

This is a great website and I wish you luck! Please stick around because there are so many bits of good advice here!
WOW really thank you! It's not that long. I really enjoyed reading it. It's very useful, I feel better as I'm understanding things. I've few questions:
- In the morning, Mathew wants to go inside the cage to eat, and as long as I'm around he eats. However, he stops when I leave for few minutes to finish my morning preparations. I don't know what to do?
- Sometimes I have to put him back quickly to the cage for some urgent reasons, and he quickly ran from my finger to my arm as I'm putting him in. Thus, I have to close the door while my hand is still in the cage and then pull my hand. I feel that by doing this I'm shocking him. I really don't like it, but I don't know what to do?
- Whenever I'm not at home for almost the whole day, I keep thinking about him. I really feel guilty for enjoying my time out while he's at home in the cage waiting for me! I really don't know if I'm exaggerating or if this is completely normal?
- This weekend, I went to the chalet for 3 days, my brothers took my place at home. However, they were only there for few hours each day. Each night, on my bed I think about Mathew. My mind was not clear! again I don't know if I'm exaggerating or not?
Thank you in advance
 
OP
eman

eman

Member
Jul 10, 2021
51
61
Kuwait
Parrots
Rainbow Lories: Mathew & Mia 🤍
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
It sounds like it might be wise to re-home the second bird quickly, before you both grow too attached, if that is a possiblity.

Then regarding the first bird (or both if you keep them both - but in your case I think your best chance is if you indeed keep the first and re-home the second to a good home) - FIRST read over Noodles' post above. Several times, and memorize it. ... Then a suggestion (or possibly 2-in-1). You have not mentioned the cage situation. (Also I see a pic of your bird but you didn't mention the kind so I'm Guessing it's medium-sized?) Bird needs big large cage with lots of toys. Lots of variety of perches. You could even string rope perches around in your bird room. This will give your bird other things to do and play with besides you.

You also need a nice-sized cage for the bird out where the action is happening. Then bird can hang out with the family but Not be free to fly around with them. They can interact while bird is safely inside cage in the family area -- bird safe from family and family safe from bird, and you there to supervise.

Do lots of reading here on the forum & learn birdie body language, how to interact, Target Training and bite pressure training. Then you can guide your family's interactions with the bird, you can all learn to how to treat the bird well and have positive interactions together.
First, really thank you. The feeling of being understood and supported is great. I'm happy for joining the forum.

Isn't it better for Mathew to have a friend whenever I'm not at home? I work for 6h for 5 days, and sometimes I hang out after work for 2-3h but this doesn't happen a lot. I know having two rainbow lories is increasing the work for me, and consuming my energy; however, I'm thinking about Mathew too. I read Noodles' post, and it's a great one.

About the cage, the one in the picture is small. I use this cage when I want to take the birds out. Mathew also feels comfortable to sleep in it, so it's a sleeping cage too. When I got him the main bigger cage he wasn't comfortable to sleep in it at all, so I put him back in this small cage to sleep. The main cage's dimensions: 46*22*22inches. In the cage, I hanged some tree branches that are designed for parrots' cages and some toys.

Outside the cage, they have a climbing net, two perches, and one that I created with bamboo sticks. I know about the target training, as this is how I trained him to fly from one perch to another. However, I'm still not a perfect trainer. I'm teaching Him to wear his harness since a long time using the target stick, but didn't succeed yet to let him put his head inside (actually he put his head twice by mistake, but was so panicked that he pulled his head out quickly). Bite pressure training is something new to me, so I will do my search.

I'm thinking about purchasing an interior natural tree that is (safe for my parrots, easy to take care of, and doesn't need a lot of sunlight) for the room that I spend time with them in. So that the birds or "Mathew" (if I didn't keep the new one) enjoy their time out of the cage and inside the room when I'm with them and even when I'm not. Is it a good idea? and is there any that you can suggest?

Btw I like your signature: "They are not really pets. They are small People with wings and Opinions. They pay no rent, expect you to come when they call, & like to destroy stuff."

Thank you again
 
Last edited:

Kitekeeper

Well-known member
Jun 19, 2021
254
528
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Parrots
Budgerigar (Bud), Pacific Parrotlet (Sam), Roseicollis lovebird (BJ and Turq), Linneolated parakeet (Charlie and Emma)
Hi eman,

I think most of us here already endured similar situations as the one you are living.

You already received very good advices from noodles and fiddlejen. One thing you might have already understood is that parrots are challenging creatures. Another thing that I must add is that even knowing much about them, one bird is never the same as another and their personalities play a huge role in their lives and in ours.

I advise you to try to sort out how is Mathew personality. Some parrots do very well alone as long as they interact with their human friends. Others just can´t bare being alone and sometimes even the presence of just one other bird friend is not enought.

Yes they are flock birds, some personalities need the whole flock, others need just one close companion, be it bird or human. Please consider that the unnamed female you have has her own needs and personality and might not be happy with Mathew or you.

Recently after a six month period trying to figure out a female lovebird that I had here, I came to the conclusion that she would be better living in a flock. She had a mate before coming to me, the previous owner sold just her. I tried to give her another mate, changed her partner three times and she just could not bond to neither of them. Two days ago with my heart heavy to let her rehoming I talked to her and her male friend that I would rehoming them to allow them to find their own mating preferences. Both answered looking me in the eyes and I swear I felt they were thanking me.

Lovebirds are quite special for me, so I brought home another couple, but this time I asked for a already formed/bonded couple. They are teaching me that their behaviour is so different from the ones that I had to gave up. This new couple really is a pair, my previous lovebirds were just good friends and were not that happy. I am confident they will find their happiness now.

So if you choose to rehoming the female, do it for her too, not just for Matthew. Try to access how they feel about each other. A couple of Loris might take time to bond to each other.

Regarding if you are exaggerating, it depends on your bird personality, some are happy alone, others need just another bird and others need the whole flock.
 

wrench13

Supporting Member
Nov 22, 2015
8,269
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Isle of Long, NY
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Yellow Shoulder Amazon, Salty
Excellent advice from some of our more experienced members, I hope it helps. I will only amplify one point, in hopes others reading this thread heed it. Getting a 'friend' for a parrot with some socializing issues almost never ends up well, with one of 3 scenarios typical as the out come. 1 the parrots hate each other and have to be housed, played with and in general increase the work + 2x. 2 they become a pair to the exclusion of you (the third wheel syndrome). or 3 they accept the other parrot and still maintain their realstionship with you. So you have a 33% chance of the results being as you intended,

But really, even with the single parrot, it's not sounding like an ideal relationship you have. It's going to take a lot of understanding, commitment and disapline on your part, to provide an improved relationship for both of you. Harsh assesment? Possibly. But I bet a lot of the more experienced member here are already cringing after reading your original post, as a lot of parrot owners dive into parrots without true understanding of what it takes to provide a full, rich and gratifying lfe for your bird and still have one of your own.
 
OP
eman

eman

Member
Jul 10, 2021
51
61
Kuwait
Parrots
Rainbow Lories: Mathew & Mia 🤍
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #8
Hi eman,

I think most of us here already endured similar situations as the one you are living.

You already received very good advices from noodles and fiddlejen. One thing you might have already understood is that parrots are challenging creatures. Another thing that I must add is that even knowing much about them, one bird is never the same as another and their personalities play a huge role in their lives and in ours.

I advise you to try to sort out how is Mathew personality. Some parrots do very well alone as long as they interact with their human friends. Others just can´t bare being alone and sometimes even the presence of just one other bird friend is not enought.

Yes they are flock birds, some personalities need the whole flock, others need just one close companion, be it bird or human. Please consider that the unnamed female you have has her own needs and personality and might not be happy with Mathew or you.

Recently after a six month period trying to figure out a female lovebird that I had here, I came to the conclusion that she would be better living in a flock. She had a mate before coming to me, the previous owner sold just her. I tried to give her another mate, changed her partner three times and she just could not bond to neither of them. Two days ago with my heart heavy to let her rehoming I talked to her and her male friend that I would rehoming them to allow them to find their own mating preferences. Both answered looking me in the eyes and I swear I felt they were thanking me.

Lovebirds are quite special for me, so I brought home another couple, but this time I asked for a already formed/bonded couple. They are teaching me that their behaviour is so different from the ones that I had to gave up. This new couple really is a pair, my previous lovebirds were just good friends and were not that happy. I am confident they will find their happiness now.

So if you choose to rehoming the female, do it for her too, not just for Matthew. Try to access how they feel about each other. A couple of Loris might take time to bond to each other.

Regarding if you are exaggerating, it depends on your bird personality, some are happy alone, others need just another bird and others need the whole flock.
First, thank you very much. Each time I read new advice, I feel better. I really understood how challenging they're. However, as much as they're challenging, they're so lovely souls. Mathew and the new lovely one taught me a lot.

When I got the new "unnamed parrot", she was confused and for almost two weeks she didn't seem relaxed. She also seemed to be scared when it's her bedtime. she has biting issues, and she wasn't patient at all. She only liked to stand in my head and my brothers too, holding the hair tightly. I love her. I'm trying to understand her too. It's been 23 days since I got her. She's is bitting less, she's obeying me, she's calmer, and she loves preening me. I'm finally seeing her relaxed when it's her bedtime, as I sing for her every night looking directly into her eyes and blinking "I read that birds like it when a person blinks". Little by little she trusted our hands. Her feet were never relaxed when standing on my finger, but now they're. She also moves calmly on me (from my finger to my arm, shoulder, and head). She's very smart as she learns very fast. Unlike Mathew, she's very social and she's more independent.

Whenever my family is out, I let them both freely fly at home and they follow each other. Whenever one of them goes to another room by mistake they start calling each other. Sometimes they find each other, and sometimes they need my help. Whenever one of them leaves my shoulder to a stand or anywhere else, the other leaves too and vise-versa. I noticed that "Mathew" is enjoying the cage more since I got her, although they compete a lot. She too likes the cage with Mathew. They don't like to be in the cage without each other at all. They sleep in two small separate cages, and I keep their doors open. In the morning I find them out, standing on the perch waiting for me. When I only had Mathew, even though I kept the door open back then too, he used to wait for me to get him out of the cage. I even noticed that they're copying some behaviors from each other.

Btw I don't like the fact that I didn't name her yet, but I know when I name her I will get attached to let her go. So I'll give her a name as soon as I make my mind.

I'm considering their relationship and how well they're getting along with each other. For the first two weeks, keeping them alone together without being with them was dangerous. I'm trying not to think about re-homing her because she was really confused and biting when she arrived for almost two weeks. I also noticed some different hormonal behaviors. Although she's social, I took almost two weeks to build trust with her and to see her relaxed and calm. I also helped her to almost get over the hormonal behaviors. I really don't want her to experience this again.

Really thank you again
 
Last edited:
OP
eman

eman

Member
Jul 10, 2021
51
61
Kuwait
Parrots
Rainbow Lories: Mathew & Mia 🤍
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #9
Excellent advice from some of our more experienced members, I hope it helps. I will only amplify one point, in hopes others reading this thread heed it. Getting a 'friend' for a parrot with some socializing issues almost never ends up well, with one of 3 scenarios typical as the out come. 1 the parrots hate each other and have to be housed, played with and in general increase the work + 2x. 2 they become a pair to the exclusion of you (the third wheel syndrome). or 3 they accept the other parrot and still maintain their realstionship with you. So you have a 33% chance of the results being as you intended,

But really, even with the single parrot, it's not sounding like an ideal relationship you have. It's going to take a lot of understanding, commitment and disapline on your part, to provide an improved relationship for both of you. Harsh assesment? Possibly. But I bet a lot of the more experienced member here are already cringing after reading your original post, as a lot of parrot owners dive into parrots without true understanding of what it takes to provide a full, rich and gratifying lfe for your bird and still have one of your own.
Really thank you. This is another great help.
Exactly, the work has been doubled "I thought I was exaggerating about this". However, at the same time, I'm seeing them getting along with each other. Although they're still competing.

Here's a brief about the relationship between me and "Mathew":
- He loves preening me
- He waits for me every morning as he hears my sound behind the door he starts calling
- When I come back from work he quickly jumps to the door of the cage to take him out.
- He chatters a lot with me
- He likes eating from my hand
- whenever I walk a bit far away from him, he flies to me
- He loves when I put my hand on his sleeping cage as he leans on it.
- This one might be unbelievable and it really shocked me, but it's true: "I mentioned above that the new "unnamed parrot" used to bit a lot" Mathew once was on my shoulder as he saw her biting my finger so hard, he lowered his head toward her and shout as she stopped! I really could not believe it at first. However, this happened again as he was on my head, and she was on my hand. He flew to her and pushed her! Of course, after him shouting at her, and pushing her, I didn't let her. I took her closer to me and tried to make her feel safe (she's biting way less now, and as I mentioned above too: she loves preening me and trusts me way more than before)

I'm a beginner, so I can't be 100% sure that everything is perfect as there might be things that I didn't consider. However, I feel that he loves me. Yet I'm sure there are ways in which I can make him and the new "unnamed parrot " happier without exhausting myself, and find a balance between my personal life and my life with them.

Thank you again
 

wrench13

Supporting Member
Nov 22, 2015
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EMan, just be aware that the addition of a second parrot can cause MBS *, a sickness with symptoms that are not so easily treated. These are:

  • Loss of sleep - as you approach the upper limit of the condition, sleep becomes a lower priority, with resulting cascade effect
  • Excessive anxiety - reduction of the bankae countus has it's own set of symptoms
  • Progressive loss of hearing
  • Reapportionment of habitat space - as the disease takes hold and progresses, noticeable lack of habitat becomes increasingly evident, with severe cases showing "tunneling" of egress and access points around cages
  • Increased cellular engagement - a very insidious symptom, as the only points of social contact within the species become less and less, ending with all engagement via cellphone, due to time constraints
The good news is that many people live with MBS and it's resulting symptoms for many decades and in fact seem to live long and prosper.

* MBS = Multiple Bird Syndrome
 
OP
eman

eman

Member
Jul 10, 2021
51
61
Kuwait
Parrots
Rainbow Lories: Mathew & Mia 🤍
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #11
EMan, just be aware that the addition of a second parrot can cause MBS *, a sickness with symptoms that are not so easily treated. These are:

  • Loss of sleep - as you approach the upper limit of the condition, sleep becomes a lower priority, with resulting cascade effect
  • Excessive anxiety - reduction of the bankae countus has it's own set of symptoms
  • Progressive loss of hearing
  • Reapportionment of habitat space - as the disease takes hold and progresses, noticeable lack of habitat becomes increasingly evident, with severe cases showing "tunneling" of egress and access points around cages
  • Increased cellular engagement - a very insidious symptom, as the only points of social contact within the species become less and less, ending with all engagement via cellphone, due to time constraints
The good news is that many people live with MBS and it's resulting symptoms for many decades and in fact seem to live long and prosper.

* MBS = Multiple Bird Syndrome
Thank you very much! I really didn't know about any of this.
I find myself stressed a lot each time I'm in the room with both of them for training, as I don't know who exactly to concentrate on or what; for they mess up the floor and if I didn't clean at the same time it will dry and become harder to clean later! I feel that I'm spending so much time with them with very small progress in training, and this is frustrating. To be realistic, in my case giving the best time and training for both of them is not easy. I'm considering rehoming my new lovely "unnamed parrot", although I'm really loving her more each day, praying from my heart to find her a knowledgable person who will take care of her, understand her, and love her; a person with who she'll feel safe and happy.
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
163
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
WOW really thank you! It's not that long. I really enjoyed reading it. It's very useful, I feel better as I'm understanding things. I've few questions:
- In the morning, Mathew wants to go inside the cage to eat, and as long as I'm around he eats. However, he stops when I leave for few minutes to finish my morning preparations. I don't know what to do?
- Sometimes I have to put him back quickly to the cage for some urgent reasons, and he quickly ran from my finger to my arm as I'm putting him in. Thus, I have to close the door while my hand is still in the cage and then pull my hand. I feel that by doing this I'm shocking him. I really don't like it, but I don't know what to do?
- Whenever I'm not at home for almost the whole day, I keep thinking about him. I really feel guilty for enjoying my time out while he's at home in the cage waiting for me! I really don't know if I'm exaggerating or if this is completely normal?
- This weekend, I went to the chalet for 3 days, my brothers took my place at home. However, they were only there for few hours each day. Each night, on my bed I think about Mathew. My mind was not clear! again I don't know if I'm exaggerating or not?
Thank you in ad
Thank you very much! I really didn't know about any of this.
I find myself stressed a lot each time I'm in the room with both of them for training, as I don't know who exactly to concentrate on or what; for they mess up the floor and if I didn't clean at the same time it will dry and become harder to clean later! I feel that I'm spending so much time with them with very small progress in training, and this is frustrating. To be realistic, in my case giving the best time and training for both of them is not easy. I'm considering rehoming my new lovely "unnamed parrot", although I'm really loving her more each day, praying from my heart to find her a knowledgable person who will take care of her, understand her, and love her; a person with who she'll feel safe and happy.
In terms of eating, they would normally eat with their flock, and Noodles ALWAYS eats better if I am eating at the same time. I would plan your breakfast for the same time you feed your bird- that way, you are both eating and your bird gets that instinct met. I am going to read the rest shortly, but my internet was down for..like..a week...so I just wanted to put that out there because it's something that matters to my parrot a lot.
 

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