Puberty

tanyamitchellrn

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Nov 17, 2017
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Kaya Cockatoo, EJ Amazon, Pepper African Grey, Casey IRN, Glen Sun Conure
My BFA is 15 yrs old. Puberty MUST be her?!
One year and one month ago he became so aggressive we couldn't handle him anymore.
We talk to him daily and can feed him treats through the bars of the cage and that's it! Ive opened his door for just a moment to see how he does and he usually climbs out and stands on the door and then goes back in. Today I opened his cage door for a while just to see how he would do while I left the room to change waters. He flew out of the room to chase me down and shredded my shirt while viciously attacking me. I got him back to his cage without harm but am so frustrated! I've done lots of reading and know this can last 2 years or so, but his digression is severe! Does anyone have any advice? There's NO chance of contact AT ALL, but we do give him treats. I don't know what else to do for him!
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texsize

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At 15 years old he is well passed puberty.
December/January in northern hemisphere is normal breeding season for most Amazons.
Could be hitting your bird especially hard this year.
 
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tanyamitchellrn

tanyamitchellrn

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This has been going on over a year. That's why I assumed puberty. Does anyone know of a certified parrot behavior consultant?

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bug_n_flock

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Has he been in to see a certified avian vet? A behavior change can often be caused by pain/an underlying medical condition.
 

Laurasea

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Aug 2, 2018
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At this point you have a cage bound parrot, and fearful aggression. These are some good links. I know our Amazon people will be along to offer guidance too. Nothing will be fixed by staying in the cage. Make the whole outside of the cage fun interesting and a place to be. Use perches snd ropes on the outside sides and top of cage. Use the vertical space above the cage for an aerial gym! I use ceiling hooks and fishing line to hang hoops and rope spirals down to just a few inches above the cage. And attached chew shred stuff and treats here and there fir them to discover. Enrich his life in every way, increase his chances to make choices, start foraging, use treats stuffed in toys to encourage interaction.

" Eventually, the bird gets scared of "the outside world," considering the cage a sanctuary of safety. Most cage bound parrots become terrified or even aggressive, if removed from this "safe place."

When rehabilitating a cage-bound bird, it is very important to remember that any aggression, screaming, and other unwanted behaviors are generated by fear. Attempting to correct these behaviors without correcting the underlying condition will cause further harm to this bird. Before trying to resolve any other undesirable behavior, the initial phobia of leaving the cage needs to be corrected.

The fact is that most cage-bound birds become this way from spending too much time in their cages, oftentimes without good human interaction. Even when provided with toys and other distractions, a cage is still just a cage."

https://www.beautyofbirds.com/cageboundbirds.html

https://www.northernparrots.com/mob...nks&affc=2d27d564-f4a1-4c3f-930e-c72a96e555bd

https://www.thesprucepets.com/why-toys-important-for-pet-birds-4061430
 
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wrench13

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100% agree, at 15 yrs your boy is well past puberty ( that hits around 1-2 yrs for the hot 3 amazons and can last for almost as long). after that they start to coincide with a yearly mating season, which can last 2 months or longer, depending on the severity of that particular years triggers. Last year, the 2018/2019 mating season was a really brutal one, for most of us in the Northern hemisphere and the US especially. Don't ask me why, the triggers are so varied and subtle, connected with temperature, weather, day/night cycles, how your parrot's sleep cycle is kept, who knows! I do know that lots n lots of members, including me, had Amazons going out of their minds, acting up exactly like you described. I dont have a hot 3 Amazon, my small yellow shoulder Salty, is like Amazon lite, very mellow usually, well behaved for the most part (no angel but pretty predictable). He is about 6 1/2 yrs old now. Last years mating season was off the charts for unpredictable biting.

Now to your parrot. If, when this crazy season last year affected your BFA, you guys did not back off and try to work around his bad behavior, he may have learned some permanent undesirable traits that you need to turn around.

A few more bits of information will help the members here offer some more concrete advice.

How long have you had him?

Is he socialized with all members of the family or just one person?

How do you or did you in the past react to any bites he may have delivered in the past, like before this transformation? Very important to know, key in this case!

Has anything in this period of jeckyl/hyde behavior changed in the environment, people, anything, and it may not be a big obvious one - new wallpaper, a new wall hanging, rug, cage placement. Give this a good think.

and of course Bugs and Laurasea above, both good friends and experienced parronts, offer some other things to consider, abuot seeing a CAV for a general check up and trying to rehab him.

Lastly, and I can't emphasis this too much, go to our Amazon sub forum and read and then read again the 2 stickies at the top - Amazon Body Language and I Love Amazons. These 2 threads are like literal GOLD for information about the topics and general care feeding and keeping Amazons ( and other parrots too).

Hang with us, we will help you on the road to recovering your boy!
 

plumsmum2005

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Diet is also hugely connected to hormonal activity and behaviour in general so a good look at that would be worthwhile IMHO.
 

SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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The comments from my good friends above are spot-on regarding your Amazon and will provide you a strong starting point. The likelihood of your BFA being in Puberty (at 15) is not likely.

The discussion regarding a visit to your Avian Medical Professional is well founded as a Parrot in continual Hormonal State is not common, physically wearing on the Parrot and dangerous to her family.

In addition:
- The age in which Amazons enter Puberty has become ever younger. The long established age of five years has fallen. The exact age seems to vary widely from 2 years to 7 years of age. With the HOT Three the length of the transition (puberty) lasting for around five years (+/-).
- Both Puberty and later, the yearly effects of Mating Season (Hormonal Season) are chemically driven and the Parrot has no control over the point that it starts to the size of the chemical dump, and the length of any specific flow. In short, Its Not Their Fault!
- Remove all Sugar, both natural and added sugar from his diet. That means stop providing Fruits and especially dried Fruits (the Process of making Dry Fruits enhances the sugar by volume), also, many pellet manufactures add sugar to their product to gain interest of the Parrot to eat it. Stop Providing Sugar! In addition to that chemical, consider removing Salt as well, as there is very limited information regarding whether salt can cause like responses.

As well stated above, it is possible that something has changed in her environment or the interaction of one or more of the Humans in your household with the Amazon. Or, the effects over-time have accumulated to a point of a change in her behavior.

FYI: Be aware of her length of fully restful Sleep! A sleep deprived Parrot 'can' be a driver of a chemical release!
 
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chris-md

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Hi Tanya

Is he only aggressive with you? Can ANYONE hold him without issue?

I agree 100% get him to a vet to see if anything is wrong.

I’ll put this out, I’m not advocating per se since I’m not a big fan, BUT there is a time and a place: if its so bad that he is divebombing and you can’t safely get away, temporarily clipping IS an option until he has calmed down and can be safely handled again.
 
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tanyamitchellrn

tanyamitchellrn

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Nov 17, 2017
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Northwest Illinois
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Kaya Cockatoo, EJ Amazon, Pepper African Grey, Casey IRN, Glen Sun Conure
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Thank you so much everyone! He was cage bound when we rescued him 4 years ago. We worked with him because he didnt charge the cage and both my husband and i were able to get him out of the cage and to sit with us. It was amazing. This agression developed over night and he now chugs at the cage and chases us fiercely with a fanned tail and pinning eyes.

We will try to get him in a travel cage and to a vet. I have an exceptional AV for my cockatoo... and then we will start from scratch.

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noodles123

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Jul 11, 2018
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Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
at 15, he's been a sexually mature adult for many years. but will still have hormonal bouts. Agree that a vet visit is in order.

Make sure you work on the cage-bound issue gently and patiently--- that is important.


Also, avoid allowing access to huts/tents etc/shadowy spaces (these make hormones worse). Pet on the head and neck only if you get to the point where he is letting you touch him etc. MAKE SURE he is getting at least 10 hours sleep each night on a schedule--- this is also very important for hormones, immune health and mood.



Does he know how to play with toys? Is he ever spending time out of his cage?
 

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