Questions about caging 2 new budgies together

Justrosie

New member
Nov 28, 2018
20
2
Hello all,

Let me start by saying that while I have had a few birds in my life, I can only remember one time where I ever had 2 birds in 1 cage, and that transition went very smoothly.

I recently purchased 2 budgies, both around 5-6 months old. 1 male, 1 female.

I purchased them both from a breeder who had his males and females caged separately (males in 1 cage, females in the other), but they could still see and hear each other.

When I drove them back to my home, about 6 hours away, I had put them in one carrier together, not really thinking before I went out to get them that I should probably bring 2 carriers. They did fine on the journey.

Now, here is/was my logic: These birds have been living together, albeit in separate cages, but still able to socialize, pretty much their entire lives (they are not siblings). I figured that since they are "acquainted" to a certain degree, and I am introducing them to a "new territory" (their cage), I could immediately put them together.

I purchased what I think is a decent sized cage for 2 budgies (30" L x 18" W x 18 H), and I also have a smaller cage that would suit one budgie, in case they needed to be separated.

As I've said, I really only ever had 2 birds together in 1 cage once; those were cockatiels, and I haven't had budgies in quite a long time. They seem to be doing ok, they're obviously still frightened and stressed from their move (it's only been a few days). They normally are pretty quiet, chirping semi-frequently. However, occasionally, they will begin "bickering", and they will make some unhappy sounds.

There is no biting, although occasionally they will begin flying in the cage. It doesn't seem like one is chasing the other, though. Really the only thing that concerns me is the noise that one or the other will sometimes make, which sounds like a "don't mess with me" chirp, if you will. It probably happens maybe 3-4 times a day, usually only for 30 seconds or so. Otherwise they seem fine.

They are in my office, and while I try not to stand/sit in front of their cage too much while they acclimate, I am in here for at least a few hours a day, using my computer.

They are frequently near each other, if not on the same perch, then perches that are perpendicular to each other, and the only time that they ever seem like they might not be ok with the other is when they are making those calls.

Do you think I have merged them together too soon, and perhaps I should separate them? Or could it just be that they are stressed with the move, the new sounds (I have a cockatoo who sings the songs of his people) and new people? I would like to keep them together in one cage, as the bickering has certainly calmed down over the few days they've been here, while happy chirping has increased, but I don't want them unnecessarily stressed, especially given that one is male and one is female.

Sorry for the overly long post, but I would really appreciate any feedback you have! Thank you! :greenyellow:
 

fiddlejen

Supporting Member
Mar 28, 2019
1,156
Media
11
753
New England
Parrots
Sunny the Sun Conure (sept '18, gotcha 3/'19). Mr Jefferson Budgie & Mrs Calliope Budgie (albino) (nov'18 & jan'19). Summer 2021 Baby Budgies: Riker (Green); Patchouli, Keye, & Tiny (blue greywings).
Budgies normally like to be together. IF you are trying to bond them to yourself and have highly tamed, highly bonded To YOU, then keeping them together will hinder that.

(Also, as I understand it, if you had two Females, there might be more need to separate them because they might fight over perceived nesting areas.)

But otherwise, for their own happiness, I would suggest keeping them together.

If you see signs of actual fighting, then you might want to separate them, either temporarily or, if needed, when you are not able to supervise. Small amounts of bickering would be normal.

Ideally, you should provide 2 of everything within the cage. 2 water dishes, 2 food dishe, Multiple perches, etc. This will Not prevent bickering but it will lessen it.

Congratulations on your new birdies!
 
OP
J

Justrosie

New member
Nov 28, 2018
20
2
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Budgies normally like to be together. IF you are trying to bond them to yourself and have highly tamed, highly bonded To YOU, then keeping them together will hinder that.

(Also, as I understand it, if you had two Females, there might be more need to separate them because they might fight over perceived nesting areas.)

But otherwise, for their own happiness, I would suggest keeping them together.

If you see signs of actual fighting, then you might want to separate them, either temporarily or, if needed, when you are not able to supervise. Small amounts of bickering would be normal.

Ideally, you should provide 2 of everything within the cage. 2 water dishes, 2 food dishe, Multiple perches, etc. This will Not prevent bickering but it will lessen it.

Congratulations on your new birdies!

Thank you for this info! No actual fighting has occurred that I have seen, more just the bickering "squawks". I am going to keep them together for a few more days to see if the noises improve; I honestly think it might just be the stress of a new home for them. If the bickering gets worse, or they begin chasing/fighting, I will separate them. Thank you! I am excited to have budgies again; these are the first English budgies I've ever owned!
 
OP
J

Justrosie

New member
Nov 28, 2018
20
2
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #4
Update: This morning they were preening each other and making the cutest squeaks. They seem to only bicker now when I'm in the office, but playing music helps!
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
163
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
I would be cautious about asymptomatic disease transmission (things like PDD, ABV and PBFD-- for which parrots are not routinely tested, as a result of the insanely high false negatives in asymptomatic carriers-- which are is 40% easily for just 1 of those diseases (among captive parrots)in the US).


Mating etc and egg-bonding, prolapse, etc etc are all also thing to take seriously....especially in mixed-gender birds, as you could then end up with a huge mess...inbreeding, parents killing babies, etc etc. Do not allow them to reproduce, as it is extremely complicated and far more work than you would think...
 
Last edited:

Most Reactions

Top