So you bought an unweaned baby...

Laurasea

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Go to first page in this thread and read if you have unweaned baby!
 

LaManuka

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So it would appear overnight we have had another new member who has had the devastating experience of having attempted to hand-raise a conure of around 5 weeks old, only to find "something went wrong" and the baby died. This sort of thing makes me very angry indeed at breeders and sellers who continue to perpetuate the fairy tales that finishing off hand feeding is easy (it’s not!), or that the bird will form a stronger bond with you (it won’t) etc etc etc, without telling the buyer the grim reality which is that if you get something wrong during this critical period the bird will most probably die. Particularly in this time of social restrictions and lockdown it can be even more difficult to find a certified avian vet to help save the baby's life.

Please if you are reading this and have been considering getting a "lockdown pet", two things are most important.

1. DO NOT BUY AN UNWEANED BABY!!!! Unweaned babies are a high risk venture at the best of times and if you're in lockdown or your local vet is closed chances are higher than usual that your baby will die.

2. A "lockdown pet", just like a Christmas one, is forever, and not to be discarded or forgotten about when this whole pandemic finally blows over. You will have a parrot on your hands with the intelligence and emotional needs of a child anywhere between 3 and 7 years of age (the bird that is, not the child). Your bird will require, nay demand, your love and attention and affection for at least the next 30 years, maybe 50, maybe so long that you will need to make arrangements for it's care in your last will and testament. When we say birds are forever, we really mean it!

Please please please people if you are reading this do not be tempted to buy an unweaned baby bird at this time, or indeed at any other time. Go back and read page one of this thread before you even think about it. A fully feathered and abundance weaned young bird socialised with humans before purchase and which has been eating solid adult food for a good few weeks is a much safer bet and you will be rewarded with a companion who will walk through life with you and love you unconditionally for years to come.
 
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azgardezi

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Can anyone recommend me a feed other than Kaytee? Someone I know lost his bird to Kaytee. I am currently feeding the Psttacius baby formula. My bird has grown all of its feathers but still has not weaned.
 

wrench13

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Hmmm, Kaytee is the go to formula for weening. Are you sure they a) mixed it to the right consistency? and b) Has it at the right temperature? Thats critical, and c) Knows how to ween baby parrots? If not done right, it will kill the baby, regardless if a) and b) above.
 

azgardezi

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Hmmm, Kaytee is the go to formula for weening. Are you sure they a) mixed it to the right consistency? and b) Has it at the right temperature? Thats critical, and c) Knows how to ween baby parrots? If not done right, it will kill the baby, regardless if a) and b) above.


There is a possibility that the Kaytee feed he bought was expired. Since the formula is imported and is very expensive to get in bulk, most people tend to get smaller packets that are apparently taken from the bulk packaging.



Then there is the possiblity of a and b that you mentioned.



Yes he has experience in weening baby parrots.





A non expired Kaytee is what I would go for.
 

birdiemama

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Doobie, a Pineapple Green Cheek Conure baby about 6 weeks old (on May 11, 2020)
SilverSage, thank you very much; your post was most helpful and informative. Now I am angry too! But, I am trying to learn everything I can so all this will have a positive outcome. So far, so good. I'm no expert but I will be extra careful. Thankfully, QuakQuak is 'flying'. I am very careful about the temperature of his food, and he seems to be active and content. I'll keep an eye on your thread. Thanks again.
 

Saash

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I love this thread, I really do - it does exactly what it should do, it places a warning, it places a reprimand, and then it gives help to people in need!

So I found this really useful article to place on this thread, may it help someone out there!

I keep coming up on posts from people with very very young cocketiels. This person posts for help, gets very little help, and days later the baby dies. I feel like its the same person every time.

We need to be ever aware that although there's this perfect first world scenario of the right people doing the right job, every now and then there is someone that just doesn't know and needs real help.

The one thing I picked up that isn't really in the article is about cages - baby birds to not belong in cages. They need to be safe, comfortable, warm, and germ free. When they start waddling around, they shouldn't find their way into high places with no supervision so they can plunge themselves to their death. Rust is toxic, galvanised metal is toxic, the wrong floor can damage the babies feet or legs. But otherwise, this is quite a helpful link.

https://www.futurepets.com/trivia/birds-handfeeding.htm
 

SailBoat

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The sad reality is that an ever larger number of first world breeders are pushing unweaned babies of all species into the hands of buyers that haven't a clue what they are getting into. In near all cases this is based around increasing their profits based on younger Parrots allowing the buyer being able to 'bond' with their new baby. In addition, the buyers are equally in the wrong as they want the baby earlier to reduce their costs. This convoluted reality results in an ever increasing number of babies passing or developing behavior issues that haunt that Parrot for a lifetime.

There is a ton of shame to be spread around on both sides.
 
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