YouTube video of free flying Australian parrots

Betrisher

Well-known member
Jun 3, 2013
4,246
61
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Parrots
Dominic: Galah(RIP: 1981-2018); The Lovies: Four Blue Masked Lovebirds; Barney and Madge (The Beaks): Alexandrines; Miss Rosetta Stone: Little Corella
The Womachs are apparently on holiday here in Oz. This vid shows them with a free-flying club somewhere in Australia (wish they were local!). Most of the birds are natives, but there are also an Alexandrine, a Conure and a pair of Macaws. Check out the Major Mitchell (white and pink) and the Yellow-tailed Black Cocky!

I have to say it gave me the chills a bit. The area where they're free-flying looks like prime habitat for eagles, hawks and falcons. I'm truly surprised not to have seen one stalking the parrots. I dunno if I'd ever be brave enough to risk my flock, even despite the obvious joy it brings to the birds.

[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UmyPf8VFPc"]I Got to Play With a BLACK COCKATOO!!! - YouTube[/ame]
 

chris-md

Well-known member
Feb 6, 2010
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529
Maryland - USA
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Parker - male Eclectus

Aphrodite - red throated conure (RIP)
They were there a couple months ago. They are just now wrapping up a Florida tour of master classes and private consults.

I don’t disagree with you. But I think you have to give everyone there the benefit of the doubt that they know what they are doing. Responsible free flight isn’t just training your bird to come back. It also means knowing the hunting habit of raptors who would threaten the parrots - ie never fly right after a major storm when raptors will be at their hungriest and most desperate. The womachs really hammer this fact home. Before going into free flight, they studied with raptor experts to learn everything they can about these predators.

If they are free flying, they likely know the risk of raptor predation is minimized. Not zero, there’s always a risk as you intimate, but minimized.
 

ParrotGenie

Member
Jan 10, 2019
946
3
Indiana
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2 umbrella Cockatoos One male named Cooper and female named Baby 1 Little Corella male named Frankie and have 5 Cockatiels three named Male named Pepper, Fiesco for the female and female named Wylie.
They were there a couple months ago. They are just now wrapping up a Florida tour of master classes and private consults.

I don’t disagree with you. But I think you have to give everyone there the benefit of the doubt that they know what they are doing. Responsible free flight isn’t just training your bird to come back. It also means knowing the hunting habit of raptors who would threaten the parrots - ie never fly right after a major storm when raptors will be at their hungriest and most desperate. The womachs really hammer this fact home. Before going into free flight, they studied with raptor experts to learn everything they can about these predators.

If they are free flying, they likely know the risk of raptor predation is minimized. Not zero, there’s always a risk as you intimate, but minimized.

Raptors around is something you have to watch out for, as they can chase, or worst catch a parrot and both usually results in lost, or dead parrot. Your parrot has to adapt to environment, noises, predators, as well as wildlife around, way more complex to free flying, then just recall training. You have to know what you are doing and surrounding and weather. A lot more complex, Yes even a large macaw is even at risk if not careful. Plus a raptor will have no issue swooping down and attacking you as well to get to what they consider maybe lunch if desperate enough. Eagles can fly 20 to 40 mph and can dive at speeds around 100 mph, they can serious hurt you. I also work with and train raptors as well, so know them well.

I seen a lot of these You-tuber so call professional trainers lose their birds, or put out misinformation that cringe-worthy and downright dangerous as they take risks for YouTube views and for profit and will block negative criticism and then do a video days later of bird getting attack and injuries after was warned. I warned one lady I won't mention and now her Hyacinth macaw has a huge hole in beak and told her not to put the two maccaw together as saw how terrirorial the other macaw was over the tree stand she had them on and how aggressive that macaw was, she assume it was playful behavior and continue to keep them together and deleted my and other comments. A couple days later that macaw attack her baby macaw. Honestly I hoping I was wrong for the sake of that poor macaw which in the end suffer the consequences. The people in that video are more responsible and much better of the pet tubers I seen, but still not perfect.
 
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chris-md

Well-known member
Feb 6, 2010
4,060
529
Maryland - USA
Parrots
Parker - male Eclectus

Aphrodite - red throated conure (RIP)
[

Raptors around is something you have to watch out for, as they can chase, or worst catch a parrot and both usually results in lost, or dead parrot.

I do believe that is the implication of what I said, yes.
 

SailBoat

Supporting Member
Jul 10, 2015
15,024
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Western, Michigan
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DYH Amazon
Sadly, we live in the center of Red Tail Hawk village and our backyard is used as part of the flight training for each years newest members... We are apparently the place to bring young Hawks for tight inside banked turns. A they come at full fight speed down the South side of our home complete a high speed turn to the North around the East face of the house and onward into the neighbors bird feed feeder. The open backyard provides room for spin-outs, barrow rolls, lift loss (wings not positioned correctly to maintain flow), etc, etc, etc...
The graduating young return late summer to target smaller manuals.

The parents patrol the area year around.

And, earlier this last week, we became the nighttime haunt of a Great Horned Owl... So, no free flying for our guy outside the house anytime of the day or night. For the life of me, I haven't a clue why s/he is here... Clearly our backyard is more active around the clock than we knew.
 

ParrotGenie

Member
Jan 10, 2019
946
3
Indiana
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2 umbrella Cockatoos One male named Cooper and female named Baby 1 Little Corella male named Frankie and have 5 Cockatiels three named Male named Pepper, Fiesco for the female and female named Wylie.
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Betrisher

Betrisher

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Jun 3, 2013
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61
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Dominic: Galah(RIP: 1981-2018); The Lovies: Four Blue Masked Lovebirds; Barney and Madge (The Beaks): Alexandrines; Miss Rosetta Stone: Little Corella
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They were there a couple months ago. They are just now wrapping up a Florida tour of master classes and private consults.

I don’t disagree with you. But I think you have to give everyone there the benefit of the doubt that they know what they are doing. Responsible free flight isn’t just training your bird to come back. It also means knowing the hunting habit of raptors who would threaten the parrots - ie never fly right after a major storm when raptors will be at their hungriest and most desperate. The womachs really hammer this fact home. Before going into free flight, they studied with raptor experts to learn everything they can about these predators.

If they are free flying, they likely know the risk of raptor predation is minimized. Not zero, there’s always a risk as you intimate, but minimized.

You're right, of course, chris-md, but have you been to Australia? We have raptors virtually on every street corner! Just sitting in my back yard, I can see Wedge-tailed Eagles, White-breasted Sea Eagles, Whistling Kites, Little Eagles, Swamp Harriers, Brown Goshawks, Collared Sparrowhawks, Peregerine Falcons, Brown Falcons, Australian Hobbies, Letter-winged Kites and Nankeen Kestrels. I live in the suburbs of the second-largest city in the state (after Sydney) with built-up areas all around me, yet the raptors still hunt in the suburbs. The video was shot, I think, on Kogarah Oval, which pretty much equates to the habitat where I live.

I didn't say they shouldn't *do* the free-flying. I just said it gave *me* the chills and I don't think I'd be so brave as to risk my flock. I've seen a Peregrine whip down out of the sky and neatly subtract a dove from the top of my clothesline. While it was utterly incredible, it wasn't pretty: all that was left of the dove was a puff of little contour feathers.

On the other hand, of course, it did my heart good to see species free-flying that I would normally see housed in a cage 2' x 2' x 2'. Thankfully, Australians are finally catching on that birds need rather more care than they were traditionally given.
 

chris-md

Well-known member
Feb 6, 2010
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529
Maryland - USA
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Parker - male Eclectus

Aphrodite - red throated conure (RIP)
I have not, but it’s on mine and my partners life bucket list to visit!

I sometimes dream of free flying (to the point of allowing it to inform hypothetical relocation options for us), but would absolutely not do it here.

Like you (and Steven above) we also live squarely in raptor country.

I think the womachs have it right on their practices (at least the ones they post online). I’d really only consider it in the middle of a desert with nothing around for miles. the vídeo you posted? Not a location I’d consider. But for my own criticisms, I trust they know what they’re doing over my personal objections :)
 
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Laurasea

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Aug 2, 2018
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Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
I posted before that I had a hawk hit my big window trying to get my Neptune as he sat inside on perch. Truely terrified me. The hawk hit at an angle or I think would have shattered my window. The hawk is still around and comes out of the blue surprising me everytime he shows up.

I wish we could rent out closed stadiums to fly our birds.
 

fiddlejen

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Mar 28, 2019
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Sunny the Sun Conure (sept '18, gotcha 3/'19). Mr Jefferson Budgie & Mrs Calliope Budgie (albino) (nov'18 & jan'19). Summer 2021 Baby Budgies: Riker (Green); Patchouli, Keye, & Tiny (blue greywings).

AmyMyBlueFront

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Apr 14, 2015
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Jonesy a Goffins 'Too who had to be rehomed :-(

And a Normal Grey Cockatiel named BB who came home with me on 5/20/2016.
The Womachs are apparently on holiday here in Oz. This vid shows them with a free-flying club somewhere in Australia (wish they were local!). Most of the birds are natives, but there are also an Alexandrine, a Conure and a pair of Macaws. Check out the Major Mitchell (white and pink) and the Yellow-tailed Black Cocky!

I have to say it gave me the chills a bit. The area where they're free-flying looks like prime habitat for eagles, hawks and falcons. I'm truly surprised not to have seen one stalking the parrots. I dunno if I'd ever be brave enough to risk my flock, even despite the obvious joy it brings to the birds.

I Got to Play With a BLACK COCKATOO!!! - YouTube

Those fids are having so much FUN!:D Just listen to them chatter up a storm. I would have loved to be there and witness the joy.

Jim
 

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