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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 01-13-2020, 08:12 AM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Quote: Originally Posted by LaManuka View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by joshwahwoo View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by LaManuka View Post
It would seem you posed a very similar question yesterday on a different thread.

My question to you is, are you prepared to take on a creature that is much less like a pet and much more like a human toddler? With all the demands on your time, money, emotions and personal freedoms that comes with a human toddler? Which never grows up and may very well soon clash with your life post-school, when you may wish to leave your home town, live or work overseas, get married to someone who hates birds etc etc etc? Birds have emotional requirements far beyond those of cats or dogs and do not do well if the human they’ve come to love and trust is gone for great swathes of the day, or disappears altogether.

You may think you have your next few years all mapped out but life at your age can throw you unexpected curveballs like it did for me when I ended up moving and living halfway around the world not once but twice, and I would have hated the thought of leaving any companion bird behind. I am not trying to scare you off but these are the more important issues you need to very closely examine, not which species you should get.
You are saying it might affect my life POST school? So you are saying that the school life shouldbt be a big problem but infact it is my life afterwards. I have that planned out, will be staying at one place for the rest of my life, excluding vacations. And also, "you need to very closely examine" , this seems to be an issue to me, i have not found a proper guide on everything i need to know, so far the only thing ive read is "they need a lot of time", " they are very intellgient" .
You have come here seeking opinions and advice - these are mine and you are free do with them as you wish. Congratulations by the way on your ambition to become a vet, a noble and worthy career indeed!

The species you refer to are among the more challenging to keep. If their intellectual, dietary and emotional needs are not met it can result in a miserable bird who ends up plucking all his feathers out or even mutilating his own flesh. And yes, the gases from Teflon which are not detectable to us can and do travel throughout whole houses and kill birds many rooms away, as has happened to even very experienced owners on this forum.

I have no wish to discourage you from owning a bird and in looking for insight from people who have had birds all their lives you are showing a willingness to learn what it takes first before jumping in feet first - if only everyone did that there’d be a lot fewer birds who end up miserable, neglected, rehomed or dead. We here have all made mistakes along the way and only wish to prevent others from repeating them.
I have decided to get a bird whether other people say no, only question is when. I am head to learn more about the bird, because I can not find enough information, for example I haven’t found anything on teflons on the internet, and luckily my parents have specifically removed all Teflon products for other reasons.

BUTTT.... I Would like some personal experiences and guides from other people as information is limited. Thanks
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 01-13-2020, 08:41 AM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Quote: Originally Posted by noodles123 View Post
I want to add to what she said-- you do seem like a respectable/smart person. When I say "wait to get a bird" it has nothing to do with your intelligence or responsibility, and everything to do with how much life changes between 17-25. There is so much change in terms of schedule, responsibility, employment, housing etc...and financially it can also be a VERY difficult time. Birds do terribly with change, they cost a ton of money long-term, they limit your flexibility in terms of your own schedule (due to bedtimes/meal times etc) and they can struggle with being boarded if you have to leave. It's not like you can have a neighbor come over and let the bird out either because the bird would have to be bonded with that person or they would likely get bitten and have trouble performing care duties.

SO I just wanted to repeat----you sound like a smart guy but I say to wait until you are older because I would never get a parrot until I was settled in a house (not apartment) with my own ability to set rules for what can/can't be used in the home (chemicals and Teflon) and with a steady job that had a suitable income and bird-friendly hours. You sound like a great future parrot owner (because you can enough to research)--it's just a matter of planning for the best time.

Understood, again, i am only looking for information on Grey Parrot Care as there isnt a lot of this. And income shouldnt be a problem because getting a parrot is a combined decision of me and my parents, but unfortunately they can not speak good english so i am here.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 01-13-2020, 09:22 AM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Hi Josh,
We're you able to go and read the link I posted earlier in your thread?

We are just trying to prepare you. But if your drive is strong to bring a parrot into your life, and you are passionate , loyal, committed, patient, tolerant, then you can make it work. We have young members who have made it work. It's just that we have so many that aren't able to keep their parrot. And it is only that , in this time of a person's life, so much will be changing, school, persuut of a career, establishing your own household, finding a life partner. And that's harder on you when you have the commitment of your parrot. It's like being a single parent at your age, it can be done, but some find it a real struggle.

Parrots do like routines, but they can be flexible somewhat. Morning is a very impove time to a parrot, they need to know their flock survived the night. As a prey species night is a vulnerability time for them. So they will call and tell till they see you and know you are alive. Sharing breakfast with them is very good. Then setting up foraging and stuff they can destroy easily while you are gone.

You aim to have the parrot out of the cage for all the time you are home. 3-4 hours of interaction with you or more. A set bedtime, 10-12 hours of sleep.

If I know you can follow links in thread, and want to read them, I have other good articles.
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Old 01-13-2020, 10:22 AM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

All great advice given so far -- I was one of those kids that got a conure when I was around 12-13. It was the best time of my life....until I turned 18 and had to go to college. I had to rehome my conure after only 5 years with him, when he is supposed to live 30...

Take it from someone who has been there -- I was that teenager that was obsessed with getting my own bird...until my life changed and suddenly I realized it wasn't right for me to own a parrot who would live so long. I eventually went to college where there were NO pets allowed in my dorm, I did NOT have any time whatsoever to devote to a parrot, and I even travelled to different countries while in college, so the decision I made to get a parrot was a poor one.

Think about it, at 17 your life is just beginning to change. You may be graduating high school, going to college soon or starting a career as most young adults do when they turn this age....your life is about to change SO much with a new career, thinking about more schooling, social life, you'll likely start dating soon or want to be out with friends, go out drinking and partying, not to mention studying for school... just think about how much time will be left for your potential new bird.

You won't be living with your family forever, most kids want to make their own life, move out, make new friends, move away, travel the world, explore, make mistakes, and all this stuff doesn't do well with a parrot. They crave stability, quiet, calm but attentive atmosphere, one where you will be home a lot and are already established in your life.

Please reconsider getting a parrot until you are living on your own, have your own source of income, are done with all schooling and can focus entirely on giving a parrot a stable life.
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Old 01-13-2020, 06:46 PM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Quote: Originally Posted by Laurasea View Post
Hi Josh,
We're you able to go and read the link I posted earlier in your thread?

We are just trying to prepare you. But if your drive is strong to bring a parrot into your life, and you are passionate , loyal, committed, patient, tolerant, then you can make it work. We have young members who have made it work. It's just that we have so many that aren't able to keep their parrot. And it is only that , in this time of a person's life, so much will be changing, school, persuut of a career, establishing your own household, finding a life partner. And that's harder on you when you have the commitment of your parrot. It's like being a single parent at your age, it can be done, but some find it a real struggle.

Parrots do like routines, but they can be flexible somewhat. Morning is a very impove time to a parrot, they need to know their flock survived the night. As a prey species night is a vulnerability time for them. So they will call and tell till they see you and know you are alive. Sharing breakfast with them is very good. Then setting up foraging and stuff they can destroy easily while you are gone.

You aim to have the parrot out of the cage for all the time you are home. 3-4 hours of interaction with you or more. A set bedtime, 10-12 hours of sleep.

If I know you can follow links in thread, and want to read them, I have other good articles.
I have had a look at the link you sent me, but there had some really useful information on this post already so I will take notes on these before I move elsewhere. I believe I can provide enough interaction to keep him busy and happy , thank you .
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Old 01-13-2020, 06:49 PM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Quote: Originally Posted by Laurasea View Post
Hi Josh,
We're you able to go and read the link I posted earlier in your thread?

We are just trying to prepare you. But if your drive is strong to bring a parrot into your life, and you are passionate , loyal, committed, patient, tolerant, then you can make it work. We have young members who have made it work. It's just that we have so many that aren't able to keep their parrot. And it is only that , in this time of a person's life, so much will be changing, school, persuut of a career, establishing your own household, finding a life partner. And that's harder on you when you have the commitment of your parrot. It's like being a single parent at your age, it can be done, but some find it a real struggle.

Parrots do like routines, but they can be flexible somewhat. Morning is a very impove time to a parrot, they need to know their flock survived the night. As a prey species night is a vulnerability time for them. So they will call and tell till they see you and know you are alive. Sharing breakfast with them is very good. Then setting up foraging and stuff they can destroy easily while you are gone.

You aim to have the parrot out of the cage for all the time you are home. 3-4 hours of interaction with you or more. A set bedtime, 10-12 hours of sleep.

If I know you can follow links in thread, and want to read them, I have other good articles.
Quote: Originally Posted by itzjbean View Post
All great advice given so far -- I was one of those kids that got a conure when I was around 12-13. It was the best time of my life....until I turned 18 and had to go to college. I had to rehome my conure after only 5 years with him, when he is supposed to live 30...

Take it from someone who has been there -- I was that teenager that was obsessed with getting my own bird...until my life changed and suddenly I realized it wasn't right for me to own a parrot who would live so long. I eventually went to college where there were NO pets allowed in my dorm, I did NOT have any time whatsoever to devote to a parrot, and I even travelled to different countries while in college, so the decision I made to get a parrot was a poor one.

Think about it, at 17 your life is just beginning to change. You may be graduating high school, going to college soon or starting a career as most young adults do when they turn this age....your life is about to change SO much with a new career, thinking about more schooling, social life, you'll likely start dating soon or want to be out with friends, go out drinking and partying, not to mention studying for school... just think about how much time will be left for your potential new bird.

You won't be living with your family forever, most kids want to make their own life, move out, make new friends, move away, travel the world, explore, make mistakes, and all this stuff doesn't do well with a parrot. They crave stability, quiet, calm but attentive atmosphere, one where you will be home a lot and are already established in your life.

Please reconsider getting a parrot until you are living on your own, have your own source of income, are done with all schooling and can focus entirely on giving a parrot a stable life.
Yes I believe I will be moving for university. But originally I wanted to go to Australia, but because I can’t bring my bird or other pets with me I have decided to go to England. I know it will be stressful for them but it will only be a one time thing. And plus, I don’t have friends and is an introvert so I prefer to stay with my family and close friends. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:43 PM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Also don't get a baby bird that isn't weaned. You want a fully weaned baby. Also you want the young bird to have all feathers a d learn to fly. That prevents many behavior problem later in life. Getting an unweaned baby won't make you closer, infact babies are programed to leave parents. Also taking an unweaned baby can lead to their death, or other problems. The larger parrots take longer to wean, so bad breeders want to dump them and the work, and get cash faster.
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Last edited by Laurasea; 01-13-2020 at 09:49 PM.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:55 PM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

If you have made your mind up to go ahead and obtain a bird I sincerely wish you every success. This forum will be only too happy to help and support you and your bird with any information you may need.

Bear in mind that some bird species such as African greys are protected under the CITES treaty regulating their ownership, trade and movements across international borders. Some people have found they were easily able to take their bird overseas with them but then due to various CITES or customs issues were unable to bring them back to their home country. I’ve also read a very sad story only recently of an African grey stuck in quarantine for months, having been imported into the USA, who missed his human so much he quite literally died of a broken heart. I would hate for this to happen to you.
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Old 01-13-2020, 09:38 PM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Hi Josh,

I was just like you 8 months ago. I started my search of a parrot here asking questions, and I took in a male Eclectus in November last year. I grew up in Taiwan, and I work for a university in the US. I may be more familiar with your living environment/expected college life in general to give you insights.

My experience is obvious in the Eclectus, but the general parrot care level is similar. I won't talk you out of getting a parrot, but I want to show you the sacrifices needed, then you can make an informed decision.

I start my day around 7am. 3 of out 5 days, I sneak out of my place before waking up my bird because my husband has the flexibility to stay home. Perks of being a professor in a social science field. If you do actual science, you stay in the lab for 8+ hours a day.
Husband gets up around 9am to train and feed the bird. He does research at home and spend time with the bird. Bird is out in the morning. In the afternoon, he trained the bird to be in cage for a few hours, so he can do whatever he needs.
I come home at 6 pm. I do some mini training. We feed the bird and have dinner at the same time. Every other day we take the bird into shower with one of us. The other person cleans the cage, playstand, and any poop areas. I usually sing with my bird for a hour, and we put him to bed at 9 pm.
On the days that we both need to leave the house, bird is woken up at 730 am. We give him food, and just leave him in cage until we come back. Then we repeat the night routine.

Ever since we got the bird, we don't go out to eat as much. We probably do that once or twice a month. When we go out of town, we beg friends to watch him 3 times a day. We trained our friends to read the bird's body language, and we had to tell our friends "sorry, can't guarantee that bird won't bite!" Let me just say that I am SO LUCKY to have my friends. This was not an easy task.

Every couple weeks, I have to make my bird fresh chops. I buy fresh veggies/fruits, and I blend them into small pieces. I freeze them in portions. When I make chop, my whole night is gone. That's all I do. While the Grey can do well on pellets compared to the Eclectus, it is still suggested to give fresh chop to the Greys at least one meal a day. Then...you still spend time making chop. lol

Now, I consider my bird to be easy compared to many other people's. Winston (my bird) is very good at being alone. He is somewhat quiet. He has not had problems when I sneak in some TOP pellets in his diet, but we sacrificed date time (yes, we are married and still date.), gym time, some vacation time to care for Winston. We are ok as a married couple.

In your situation, it means a couple things:
1. Time
No 夜衝 (that's how we call it in TW) or late night KTV with friends, class has to be scheduled according to the bird's need, and what if you need to do an internship/part-time job?

2. Relationship
You might not be able to have just any friends over. You might not be able to go crush a friend's place to play video games all night long. You may date any girls (but no overnight dates because birdie goes hungry when you are gone). However, you MUST marry someone who's at least 150% on board with the bird life. It is much easier to be in a relationship and start a bird life together than inviting a new person into a bird life in my opinion.

I just saw someone on facebook needing to rehome his bird because his wife said "ME or BIRD", and everyone on the post is saying "divorce your bad wife! If you rehome that bird, you are a bad owner. I would never marry that selfish women!" I'm not saying that's right or wrong, but imagine the pressure on that guy. I honestly think it is unfair to just ask anyone to live a bird life.

Similar story can happen between you and your parents, your future other half, and your future in-laws. (My in-laws won't event let me pet a dog. They say it's bad for girls wanting babies in the future...) Are you willing to put up with things like these?

3. Your bird ownership
It's good that your parents are going to co-own the bird. Are you okay if the bird ended up choosing your parent(s) over you? Let me just say...I was the one wanted a bird, and Winston picked my husband. I ended up to be the person who gets bites all the time. I'm talking about more than 20 bites, leaving marks, though my nails, and on my face, since I got Winston in November.
A grey is much more likely to pick a favorite person than an Eclectus. My Eclectus tolerates me just enough, and I'm working on getting us there. But, I am still disappointed at times. A bird is not going to love you unconditionally. Can you accept the bird even you ended up being the "bad person".

So, all above are the negatives I can think of. It is possible that you might be the special person who can keep a bird in college. However, I hope you make an informed decision. If you still want a bird, I urge you to wait until your first year in college. You will have a much better idea on how you can cope with a bird and university life at the same time.

I hope it helps! No matter what you decide, the forum will still be here when you need advice on your future bird.

Last edited by shinyuankuo; 01-13-2020 at 09:46 PM.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 01-13-2020, 10:17 PM
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Re: Questions about getting an Eclectus or African Grey Parrot

Quote: Originally Posted by Laurasea View Post
Also don't get a baby bird that isn't weaned. You want a fully weaned baby. Also you want the young bird to have all feathers a d learn to fly. That prevents many behavior problem later in life. Getting an unweaned baby won't make you closer, infact babies are programed to leave parents. Also taking an unweaned baby can lead to their death, or other problems. The larger parrots take longer to wean, so bad breeders want to dump them and the work, and get cash faster.
Oh... that’s surprising, I was actually aiming for a baby bird but now that I’ve read this I guess not. Thank you for the tips
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