30yo African Grey in need of new home

Talathia

New member
May 21, 2024
6
22
Parrots
African Grey, Quaker, Finch
I am writing on behalf of my dear friends who are, reluctantly and with enormous sadness, in need of rehoming their 30-year-old African Grey male. They are both in their 80's and, unfortunately, are no longer able to care for him adequately. I have known them for over 20 years, and, for the first 12 years or so, took care of Niki every weekend and when they traveled, so I am very familiar with this funny guy. My housing, health, and financial circumstances mean I am unfortunately unable to take him myself.

Niki is a big talker and singer (Somewhere Over the Rainbow, Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, Mares Eat Oats, Bibbity-Bobbity-Boo, etc.)! I've attached a video of some of his antics. He, of course, mimics all sorts of noises, from fire engine sirens to water going down the drain. He loves eating off everyone's plate, and has very specific likes (bagel with cream cheese, eggs, tangerine juice, etc). When he's at my house, he loves to tear apart sweet potato, cabbage, artichokes and corn and play with home-made foraging toys. His owners had never had a pet in their lives before getting him, so they have perhaps not provided him with the most healthy diet or enrichment toys. But he is beloved by both and spends the entire day with one or the other of them. He is particularly bonded to the 86-year-old and spends most of the day on her shoulder. Unfortunately her health is declining and she is unable to give him the attention he is used to. He is stressed by the change in their household. He has developed a mild heart condition that requires medication twice a day, but in their current circumstances they are not able to give him his medicine reliably. I am very concerned for his well-being if they are not able to rehome him soon.

My friends are located in Massachusetts. They do NOT want him to go to a rescue facility, but want him to go to a loving, patient family who will be able to understand his anticipated grief upon leaving his beloved family and home of the past 30 years. Despite the fact that (or maybe because of) he has lived with two women for 30 years, he loves men, so I believe he would do well in any household.

This is extremely painful for my friends, so only serious adopters please. I'm sure they will want to meet you and will probably have lots of questions about your setup and experience, and may even want to visit your home to see it. They are, for better or worse, exacting and have high standards. Mostly, they are looking for reassurance that Niki will be loved and cared for.

Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to any suggestions.

***Moderator edit to add the above mentioned video:

 
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My grey, estimated to be 40-50 years old, came to me by very similar circumstances. Other than, when the husband passed away 15 years before, the wife didn't take him out of his tiny cage. At all. When the lady was moved to a nursing home, poor Avery was alone in the house, and just had their son come over twice a day to check on him and clean the cage and feed him. I got the call from their neighbor, a dear friend of ours and knew I had to save him. He's the sweetest boy, and so funny. It's been a year and a half, and he's been family since the very first. ❤️

Greys are amazing, I hope you can find a perfect forever home for Niki. 🙏🙏🙏
 
I am writing on behalf of my dear friends who are, reluctantly and with enormous sadness, in need of rehoming their 30-year-old African Grey male. They are both in their 80's and, unfortunately, are no longer able to care for him adequately. I have known them for over 20 years, and, for the first 12 years or so, took care of Niki every weekend and when they traveled, so I am very familiar with this funny guy. My housing, health, and financial circumstances mean I am unfortunately unable to take him myself.

Niki is a big talker and singer (Somewhere Over the Rainbow, Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, Mares Eat Oats, Bibbity-Bobbity-Boo, etc.)! I've attached a video of some of his antics. He, of course, mimics all sorts of noises, from fire engine sirens to water going down the drain. He loves eating off everyone's plate, and has very specific likes (bagel with cream cheese, eggs, tangerine juice, etc). When he's at my house, he loves to tear apart sweet potato, cabbage, artichokes and corn and play with home-made foraging toys. His owners had never had a pet in their lives before getting him, so they have perhaps not provided him with the most healthy diet or enrichment toys. But he is beloved by both and spends the entire day with one or the other of them. He is particularly bonded to the 86-year-old and spends most of the day on her shoulder. Unfortunately her health is declining and she is unable to give him the attention he is used to. He is stressed by the change in their household. He has developed a mild heart condition that requires medication twice a day, but in their current circumstances they are not able to give him his medicine reliably. I am very concerned for his well-being if they are not able to rehome him soon.

My friends are located in Massachusetts. They do NOT want him to go to a rescue facility, but want him to go to a loving, patient family who will be able to understand his anticipated grief upon leaving his beloved family and home of the past 30 years. Despite the fact that (or maybe because of) he has lived with two women for 30 years, he loves men, so I believe he would do well in any household.

This is extremely painful for my friends, so only serious adopters please. I'm sure they will want to meet you and will probably have lots of questions about your setup and experience, and may even want to visit your home to see it. They are, for better or worse, exacting and have high standards. Mostly, they are looking for reassurance that Niki will be loved and cared for.

Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to any suggestions.
Welcome to the forums, @Talathia, I hope we can be of some assistance to your friends in finding a loving new home for Niki!

The video you mentioned does not appear to have attached - this may be because unfortunately only very short videos can be uploaded directly from a device to the forums. BUT you CAN post a video of any size you like by first posting it on a platform like YouTube and linking it from there, and the following tutorial may be of help to you :)

 
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My grey, estimated to be 40-50 years old, came to me by very similar circumstances. Other than, when the husband passed away 15 years before, the wife didn't take him out of his tiny cage. At all. When the lady was moved to a nursing home, poor Avery was alone in the house, and just had their son come over twice a day to check on him and clean the cage and feed him. I got the call from their neighbor, a dear friend of ours and knew I had to save him. He's the sweetest boy, and so funny. It's been a year and a half, and he's been family since the very first. ❤️

Greys are amazing, I hope you can find a perfect forever home for Niki. 🙏🙏🙏
I hope they can find someone as caring as you seem to be.
 
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Welcome to the forums, @Talathia, I hope we can be of some assistance to your friends in finding a loving new home for Niki!

The video you mentioned does not appear to have attached - this may be because unfortunately only very short videos can be uploaded directly from a device to the forums. BUT you CAN post a video of any size you like by first posting it on a platform like YouTube and linking it from there, and the following tutorial may be of help to you :)

That's too bad. I don't have a YouTube account. I'm happy to email it to anyone seriously interested in adoption.
 
We can all empathize with their difficult decision, especially knowing that some breeds can outlive us. I understand they don’t want him to go to a rescue facility, but I wanted to mention that many rescues carefully screen families to ensure the perfect match for parrots.

One such place is Birds and Beaks in Michigan. The owner has a straightforward, no-nonsense approach, which I find reassuring because she's incredibly transparent and dedicated to the bird's best interests. She even declines adoptions if she feels it’s not the right fit. She is deeply committed to finding the best homes for these birds and is willing to travel across multiple states to pick them up. Many elderly owners trust her to find the next best family for their parrots.

You can find more information on her website here: https://www.birdsandbeaks.org/
 
I live in Canada or I would reach out to adopt him. I am looking for an older male companion for my african grey and Niki's pesonality sounds so much like my guy!
 
That's too bad. I don't have a YouTube account. I'm happy to email it to anyone seriously interested in adoption.
I'll send you a PM with my email. If you'd like, I can upload it and add it to your post for you. Hope it helps.
 
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We can all empathize with their difficult decision, especially knowing that some breeds can outlive us. I understand they don’t want him to go to a rescue facility, but I wanted to mention that many rescues carefully screen families to ensure the perfect match for parrots.

One such place is Birds and Beaks in Michigan. The owner has a straightforward, no-nonsense approach, which I find reassuring because she's incredibly transparent and dedicated to the bird's best interests. She even declines adoptions if she feels it’s not the right fit. She is deeply committed to finding the best homes for these birds and is willing to travel across multiple states to pick them up. Many elderly owners trust her to find the next best family for their parrots.

You can find more information on her website here: https://www.birdsandbeaks.org/
Thank you for the recommendation. I suspect they would like to try for a one-to-one adoption first, but I will pass on this information to them in case that does not work out.
 
Not sure what is out there closer to them, but we have a wonderful rescue here in Maine, and like previously mentioned, she's very particular about who she adopts out to, to make sure it's a good fit, and to give the birds their best chances of never being rehomed again. I can put you in contact with them if finding a good home on your own doesn't pan out.
 
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Not sure what is out there closer to them, but we have a wonderful rescue here in Maine, and like previously mentioned, she's very particular about who she adopts out to, to make sure it's a good fit, and to give the birds their best chances of never being rehomed again. I can put you in contact with them if finding a good home on your own doesn't pan out.
Thank you...again! :eek:)

I suspect that in their devotion to him they will be reluctant to leave the decision of a new home to someone else, even with the best recommendations behind them. But, as I said, they may not have a choice as time goes on. So I'll reach out (or you could send now) for the name of the rescue in Maine.
 
We can all empathize with their difficult decision, especially knowing that some breeds can outlive us. I understand they don’t want him to go to a rescue facility, but I wanted to mention that many rescues carefully screen families to ensure the perfect match for parrots.

One such place is Birds and Beaks in Michigan. The owner has a straightforward, no-nonsense approach, which I find reassuring because she's incredibly transparent and dedicated to the bird's best interests. She even declines adoptions if she feels it’s not the right fit. She is deeply committed to finding the best homes for these birds and is willing to travel across multiple states to pick them up. Many elderly owners trust her to find the next best family for their parrots.

You can find more information on her website here: https://www.birdsandbeaks.org/
I do appreciate rescues who are discriminating. I never thought I'd be a bird person before The Babies but they stole my heart (and life) with their Stitch-energy faces. I would never be confident enough to take on a larger parrot. I think 240g of GCCs is where I top out 😆 But a lot of people have this idea you can find the strength and will and everything, or that just because you've always wanted one you'll love it enough. But the bigger birds require MUCH more attention and stimulation to be healthy and time is something so few people can find more of in their days. I spend an hour each day with each my GCCs and then they can do whatever they want in the house free-birding it as long as I'm home, but the 3 of them share a bedroom to themselves when I'm not there because they don't just turn off when you leave. The bigger parrots need so much more than that because they're so much more energetic and intelligent. My babies are perpetual toddlers ao theyre always just on the cusp. Big parrots are perpetual 1st-2nd graders so they understand what's going on even if they don't know why.
 

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