A Warm Welcome And A Few Friendly Warnings To Keep Your Parrots Safe

TrebleMama

New member
Nov 22, 2019
34
0
Michigan
Parrots
Treble-Red-Headed Amazon
Thank you for putting this list together! Coffee/caffeine was one thing I wasn't aware of, need to make sure I don't leave my coffee cups out with leftover coffee in them, which I'm prone to doing.
 

Squeekmouse

New member
May 31, 2017
785
14
Illinois
Parrots
Yoda, Green Cheek Conure - Trigger, Congo African Grey
75341472_464263707548231_7408841993153263149_n.jpg
 

Anansi

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Dec 18, 2013
22,304
1,500
Somerset,NJ
Parrots
Maya (Female Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Jolly (Male Solomon Island eclectus parrot), Bixby (Male, red-sided eclectus. RIP), Suzie (Male cockatiel. RIP)

EmilyGims

New member
Dec 11, 2019
4
0
New York
Parrots
cockatoo
Thanks for the valuable information. I immediately remembered how I was afraid of everything and how much I did not know when I bought my first parrot Robin) Now I have 2 cockatoos and I am already familiar with all the possible dangers for them) But thanks anyway!
 

Fizaelahi

New member
Dec 15, 2020
10
0
You couldnt have said it any better.
One thing i would like to mention... And dare i say it..... Ad a new parrot owner... The worst thing i did was to clip of my parrots wing. Being scared they will fly away in the summer when we use to keep the window open. I think this creates such a bad emotional suffering and shouldnt be done.
 

SailBoat

Supporting Member
Jul 10, 2015
14,951
1,325
Western, Michigan
Parrots
DYH Amazon
Enjoyed the re-read of this wonderfully informative Thread!

The joy of rediscovering the depth of knowledge found within the many Forums in ParrotForum.
 

Ellie777Australia

Supporting Member
Apr 12, 2019
1,280
47
Queensland, Australia
Parrots
SI Eclectus Female, Ellie; RS/SI Eclectus Male, Bertie (both adopted as rescue/re-home)
I too enjoyed the rereading of this thread SailBoat. It is always good to review hazards, environment and food etc, especially with Christmas coming up...decorations, seasonal food and drinks, visitors.....
 

KatRaft

New member
Nov 4, 2020
14
0
Reno, NV
Parrots
Oliver Jardines
Charlie and Rosa YNA
Carlos B&G Macaw
Gookle Bare-eyed Cockatoo RIP
Rocky TAG RIP
Pepper Pearl Cockatiel RIP
Charm Lutino Cockatiel RIP
Another danger not mentioned, lead solder. When my father was young he had a half moon conure. The bird was fully flighted and allowed to fly around the house. Long story short the bird died suddenly and with little symptoms of any illness. After the birds death my father realized he had been chewing on an old stained glass lamp that he liked to perch on. He likely had lead poisoning from the solder used to assemble the stained glass. My Dad tells stories about how smart the little guy was. He would take him outside in a cage (fully flighted) while he was working outdoors and when he wasn't looking the bird would somehow escape and be sitting on top of the cage. He still has no idea how he escaped - he'd just be sitting on top with everything closed.
Other things to consider, my older cockatiel just fell over one day while watching the Superbowl (heart attack?). I guess the excitement was too much for her. I felt bad 'cause I don't even watch football normally.
And lastly - broken hearts. When I was a kid I had a cockatiel and my sister had a cockatiel. My sister's bird loved my bird and when my bird passed away her bird passed soon after. You could tell he was depressed and grieving.
 

InheritedBOZZEE

New member
Sep 2, 2021
1
3
Belligham
Parrots
Blue and Gold Macaw (20-25 years old)

Bird ownership is a challenge for the best of us, especially in the beginning. So many things are dangerous or even deadly to parrots. The information and hazards can be overwhelming at first. We've all been there, we've all made mistakes.

Straight to the point.

Open flames-any open flames from heat sources of any kind or smoke from any source is a major hazard for your bird.

Ovens-hot surfaces and toxic fumes, self cleaning features on your oven. It's wise to keep your kitchen off limits to Avians, especially while you're cooking.

Toxic fumes from candles, essential oils, incense, aerosols, cleaning agents, pesticides (any pesticide). Heated, NON STICK COOKWARE, small appliances with non stick heating elements. Yes, most of us prefer non-stick cookware, granted, most alternatives cost us extra time, effort and dollars, non stick cookware can cost our parrots their lives, no kidding. Once you get the hang of it, cooking with parrot safe cookware is easy, it's also a healthier choice for humans.

Electrical cords, parrot beaks are stronger than they look. Liquid in open containers, including toilets, sinks, mop buckets, etc.... Doorways, windows, access to the great outdoors and freedom. Even the largest parrots are small in comparison to humans, most can't survive being accidentally closed in a door, stepped on when playing on the floor, sat on when hanging out on comfortable furniture that humans use. Snuggling in bed with your parrot as sweet as it sounds can result in heartbreak, many parrots have been accidentally crushed or suffocated when their human fell asleep. Many parrots love an outing but if the opportunity presents itself most will escape, most will not survive on their own, those fortunate enough to be rescued usually never see their original families again. With a few precautions, you and your parrot can enjoy time outdoors but please be responsible.

A clean closed window, a glass door or a mirror can also be deadly, a bird in a new home may see any of the above and fly full speed straight into it resulting in a broken neck, it happens often.

Ingestible dangers, pills, human consumables, toxic wood, toy parts, house plants. The more obvious, chocolate, avocados, onions, caffeine, tobacco, etc.... Do a little research and be vigilant about what your buddy has access to.

It's mind bending how many parrots lose their lives to other family pets. Birds are small, birds are prey, dogs, cats, ferrets, rats and snakes are predators. If prey and predators interact, the chance of a tragic accident is always present.

Ceiling fans, if your birds are flighted, disconnect your ceiling fans, if you have to use fans to beat the heat, turn them on but make sure your parrot doesn't have access. He's safer in his cage or a different room if a fan is running.

Never assume your parrot knows best, for example, if you leave a cup of coffee and a sugary pastry or salty snack on the table, more than likely Polly or Paulie will help him or herself. Your parrot didn't grow up in the wild, he or she depends on you to keep him safe.

An incomplete diet may not knock your parrot off his perch instantly but it can shorten his life and cause long term medical issues. Before you grab that bag off the shelf, consider how long it's been there and read the ingredient list. Don't cheat your parrot out of a healthy diet for the sake of convenience, in many cases you can do better for less money. Research and choose the best diet for your parrot's health and your budget.

Water-the stuff of life. Make sure your parrot has a constant source of clean water. My cockatoo has no thought for her future, at the sound of rainfall, or any sound of a similar nature she will slap every drop of water out of her large bowl, leaving herself with nothing to drink. Parrots are small, they dehydrate quickly. Some parrots are soup makers, they dump food in their water, bacteria grows, they get sick. Check water dishes often, wash, sanitize, and dry your bowls at least once every day. Same is true of your bird's cage, parrots depend on us to keep their environment clean.

Be suspicious of products even when they say, "all natural" or "pet safe" in big friendly letters. Use logic and good judgement, just because it says it's safe for your pets doesn't mean it is, it often means the company will use any means necessary to sell you something. The pet industry makes billions from loving pet owners.

Get to know your parrot well, watch for symptoms of illness, changes in behavior or physical appearance. Have your closest certified Avian Vet's number available in case of emergency, reacting quickly can save your bird's life.

Please don't be discouraged, lots of humans can't imagine life without a parrot, the rewards are real. Living with parrots is challenging, no doubt, but it's also an adventure and often comes with a unique and lasting bond between a human and a lovable, intelligent species. All the above mentioned dangers become part of life with parrots, it gets easier and becomes part of our daily routines. IMHO, we are all fortunate to know, love, and live with these incredible birds. The rewards outweigh the efforts.

A warm welcome to ParrotForums. No matter where you are on your personal journey with your parrot, we hope you find something useful here or at the very least a group of like minded bird lovers. Congrats and best of luck.
Thank you so much for the warm welcome.

Bozz and I have a long road ahead of us.
I am currently a huge plant lady... so the reality is setting in.

I am so excited for Bozz to move in but I am extremely grateful I have a month to prep and have joined a few different forums to become well educated on the must knows and the fun to knows :)

From a newbie bird lady to my Experienced Bird People <3
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Aug 21, 2010
31,037
3,188
San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Thank you so much for the warm welcome.

Bozz and I have a long road ahead of us.
I am currently a huge plant lady... so the reality is setting in.

I am so excited for Bozz to move in but I am extremely grateful I have a month to prep and have joined a few different forums to become well educated on the must knows and the fun to knows :)

From a newbie bird lady to my Experienced Bird People <3
Thanks so much for joining, feel free to peruse the forums and post any questions!!
 

Trosselle

New member
Sep 26, 2021
1
2
Parrots
conures

Bird ownership is a challenge for the best of us, especially in the beginning. So many things are dangerous or even deadly to parrots. The information and hazards can be overwhelming at first. We've all been there, we've all made mistakes.

Straight to the point.

Open flames-any open flames from heat sources of any kind or smoke from any source is a major hazard for your bird.

Ovens-hot surfaces and toxic fumes, self cleaning features on your oven. It's wise to keep your kitchen off limits to Avians, especially while you're cooking.

Toxic fumes from candles, essential oils, incense, aerosols, cleaning agents, pesticides (any pesticide). Heated, NON STICK COOKWARE, small appliances with non stick heating elements. Yes, most of us prefer non-stick cookware, granted, most alternatives cost us extra time, effort and dollars, non stick cookware can cost our parrots their lives, no kidding. Once you get the hang of it, cooking with parrot safe cookware is easy, it's also a healthier choice for humans.

Electrical cords, parrot beaks are stronger than they look. Liquid in open containers, including toilets, sinks, mop buckets, etc.... Doorways, windows, access to the great outdoors and freedom. Even the largest parrots are small in comparison to humans, most can't survive being accidentally closed in a door, stepped on when playing on the floor, sat on when hanging out on comfortable furniture that humans use. Snuggling in bed with your parrot as sweet as it sounds can result in heartbreak, many parrots have been accidentally crushed or suffocated when their human fell asleep. Many parrots love an outing but if the opportunity presents itself most will escape, most will not survive on their own, those fortunate enough to be rescued usually never see their original families again. With a few precautions, you and your parrot can enjoy time outdoors but please be responsible.

A clean closed window, a glass door or a mirror can also be deadly, a bird in a new home may see any of the above and fly full speed straight into it resulting in a broken neck, it happens often.

Ingestible dangers, pills, human consumables, toxic wood, toy parts, house plants. The more obvious, chocolate, avocados, onions, caffeine, tobacco, etc.... Do a little research and be vigilant about what your buddy has access to.

It's mind bending how many parrots lose their lives to other family pets. Birds are small, birds are prey, dogs, cats, ferrets, rats and snakes are predators. If prey and predators interact, the chance of a tragic accident is always present.

Ceiling fans, if your birds are flighted, disconnect your ceiling fans, if you have to use fans to beat the heat, turn them on but make sure your parrot doesn't have access. He's safer in his cage or a different room if a fan is running.

Never assume your parrot knows best, for example, if you leave a cup of coffee and a sugary pastry or salty snack on the table, more than likely Polly or Paulie will help him or herself. Your parrot didn't grow up in the wild, he or she depends on you to keep him safe.

An incomplete diet may not knock your parrot off his perch instantly but it can shorten his life and cause long term medical issues. Before you grab that bag off the shelf, consider how long it's been there and read the ingredient list. Don't cheat your parrot out of a healthy diet for the sake of convenience, in many cases you can do better for less money. Research and choose the best diet for your parrot's health and your budget.

Water-the stuff of life. Make sure your parrot has a constant source of clean water. My cockatoo has no thought for her future, at the sound of rainfall, or any sound of a similar nature she will slap every drop of water out of her large bowl, leaving herself with nothing to drink. Parrots are small, they dehydrate quickly. Some parrots are soup makers, they dump food in their water, bacteria grows, they get sick. Check water dishes often, wash, sanitize, and dry your bowls at least once every day. Same is true of your bird's cage, parrots depend on us to keep their environment clean.

Be suspicious of products even when they say, "all natural" or "pet safe" in big friendly letters. Use logic and good judgement, just because it says it's safe for your pets doesn't mean it is, it often means the company will use any means necessary to sell you something. The pet industry makes billions from loving pet owners.

Get to know your parrot well, watch for symptoms of illness, changes in behavior or physical appearance. Have your closest certified Avian Vet's number available in case of emergency, reacting quickly can save your bird's life.

Please don't be discouraged, lots of humans can't imagine life without a parrot, the rewards are real. Living with parrots is challenging, no doubt, but it's also an adventure and often comes with a unique and lasting bond between a human and a lovable, intelligent species. All the above mentioned dangers become part of life with parrots, it gets easier and becomes part of our daily routines. IMHO, we are all fortunate to know, love, and live with these incredible birds. The rewards outweigh the efforts.

A warm welcome to ParrotForums. No matter where you are on your personal journey with your parrot, we hope you find something useful here or at the very least a group of like minded bird lovers. Congrats and best of luck.
As a new member of this forum, I very much appreciate this message. I have done so much research before getting my birds, but this has filled me in on much more than I came across in my research. Thank you!!
 

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