Bird blood feather!

animalgirl555

Member
Dec 28, 2023
47
78
Parrots
Mango
So today I let Mango out of his cage, and I saw that one of his wing feathers was sticking out really weirdly. I thought it was just a loose feather that got stuck on the others and hadn't come out. But, when Mango stepped up onto my hand, I saw that his wing where the feather was, was bleeding. I watched a video, and I did pull out the blood feather. He was very good about letting me grab him, but he got upset once I pulled it out (I know it probably hurt! Poor guy!)
Anyway, I put some flour on it, and it stopped bleeding. Will it be ok?
Thanks!
 
So today I let Mango out of his cage, and I saw that one of his wing feathers was sticking out really weirdly. I thought it was just a loose feather that got stuck on the others and hadn't come out. But, when Mango stepped up onto my hand, I saw that his wing where the feather was, was bleeding. I watched a video, and I did pull out the blood feather. He was very good about letting me grab him, but he got upset once I pulled it out (I know it probably hurt! Poor guy!)
Anyway, I put some flour on it, and it stopped bleeding. Will it be ok?
Thanks!

If you got the whole feather shaft out intact and the bleeding has stopped, your baby should be ok. Keep an eye on him though, but I think he should be fine :)
 
So today I let Mango out of his cage, and I saw that one of his wing feathers was sticking out really weirdly. I thought it was just a loose feather that got stuck on the others and hadn't come out. But, when Mango stepped up onto my hand, I saw that his wing where the feather was, was bleeding. I watched a video, and I did pull out the blood feather. He was very good about letting me grab him, but he got upset once I pulled it out (I know it probably hurt! Poor guy!)
Anyway, I put some flour on it, and it stopped bleeding. Will it be ok?
Thanks!
Good job it sounds like you did OK.
What's the flour for?
 
Flour helps the blood coagulate and stop bleeding. Flour, baking soda can both be used for that. Don;t use a styptic pen for this, even tho its used for humans for things like shaving cuts - its too strong for delicate bird skin and can chemically burn them.

When a blood feather ( a feather that still has a blood supply going to it, like when its relatively new) breaks, that feather base is still hooked up to the birds circulatory system. The base of the feather, hollow, if it is not removed acts like a spigot for that blood, and if not stopped, can cause a parrot to die from blood loss ( they dont have much!). That is why its critical to get all of the feather removed. A good tool to have in your first aid kit is a pair of lockable hemostats, which will allow you to grip a possibly very short and stumpy feather shaft base. Grip it and with a strong but not violent yank pull it out. THe bleeding will stop almost immediately. Using flour or other will sop up any remaining blood oozing out.

breaking a blood feather happens to almost all parrots, eventually, and its really scary to see, but be prepared and it will be almost a non issue.
 
Flour helps the blood coagulate and stop bleeding. Flour, baking soda can both be used for that. Don;t use a styptic pen for this, even tho its used for humans for things like shaving cuts - its too strong for delicate bird skin and can chemically burn them.

When a blood feather ( a feather that still has a blood supply going to it, like when its relatively new) breaks, that feather base is still hooked up to the birds circulatory system. The base of the feather, hollow, if it is not removed acts like a spigot for that blood, and if not stopped, can cause a parrot to die from blood loss ( they dont have much!). That is why its critical to get all of the feather removed. A good tool to have in your first aid kit is a pair of lockable hemostats, which will allow you to grip a possibly very short and stumpy feather shaft base. Grip it and with a strong but not violent yank pull it out. THe bleeding will stop almost immediately. Using flour or other will sop up any remaining blood oozing out.

breaking a blood feather happens to almost all parrots, eventually, and its really scary to see, but be prepared and it will be almost a non issue.
I've never heard not to use styptic products--I just pulled out my handy "bird first aid kid" that came with a bottle of styptic powder, I wonder if it's a different product than what they sell for humans or if I should toss it and replace it with a little bottle of corn starch or flour?

IMG_0272.jpeg
 
SORRY SORRY, i said baking powder above, I meant corn starch!!
I would ditch the styptic pen and add some corn starch.
 
SORRY SORRY, i said baking powder above, I meant corn starch!!
I would ditch the styptic pen and add some corn starch.
Thanks!! Honestly I have to pull this kit out so seldomly and have only used the styptic powder once in the 5 or so years I've had it on hand, which is good--I don't know what it's made of but if it could irritate their skin, better to replace with corn starch. I appreciate the insight :)
 

Most Reactions

Back
Top