Can anyone give me advice on my lovebird?

Sparklystars

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I have a 10 almost 11 year old lutino peach faced lovebird called Sherbet (short for sherbet lemon!) that I've had since I was 11. (I'm 21 now) She's (possibly he, I've never had them checked, but we have always said she) only ever seemed ill once, about a year ago when she had an upset stomach and was feeling antisocial. She seemed to be possibly moulting and she recovered quickly within a week.
However recently she has seemed more reluctant to leave her cage and has been sleeping a lot more than normal. Shes also been shaking slightly when shes out and she's normally quite adventurous/mischevious around the room, trying to get behind the tv etc 😅 but now she just wants to sit on my chest or shoulder and sleep. I dont know if there is something wrong with her, and all the vets I have called are shut. I've not taken her to the vet before (at least not since she was little I don't think) and I live in a different area now and so I dont have a designated vet for her yet.
Can anyone give me any advice? My mum has said to leave her in her cage, which I have been doing so that she can rest and have constant access to food and water. I know shes getting old but I'm worried about her. My housemates all have noticed she seems off too and shes been a bit quieter than normal vocally. I don't think there's any way it couldve been something she's eaten as she's been under constant supervision while she's out of her cage.
If it is relevant, she was hand reared and is tame, her wings aren't clipped, she is fairly picky about who she does and doesnt like but is generally pretty chilled out.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

saxguy64

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Hi there,and welcome to the forums. So glad you found us! Sorry that it's under less than happy circumstances, but stick with us!

The biggest thing to consider, is that parrots are prey animals, and as such will hide being sick or injured until they can't anymore. Typically, by the time you notice anything seeming "off", they have been sick longer than you can know. At that point, it's really important to get to an avian professional, often called a CAV- Certified Avian Vet. Keep searching and calling. It's important to do ASAP. You might have the option of a virtual visit, or even a phone consult is far better than nothing. Sick birds can't wait. In the meantime, do your best to keep her warm. Maintaining body temperature takes a lot of energy that they can't spare while fighting off an illness.
 

SailBoat

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!'m assuming that the Vet's being shut is that it is the Weekend?
In North America most all Vets are open during normal business hours. However, each is different depending on which State one is located. With our's, we bring our Parrot in and return to the parking lot until they call to retrieve our Parrot.

IMHO, non-professional, it sounds like your lovebird maybe ill and you really need to have s/he seen by an Avian Professional and the sooner the better.
 
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Laurasea

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As stated above, likely a very sick bird. Once they have any symptoms, they are very sick. Get to the vet on Monday.
I'm sorry your long time friend isn't feeling well.

Warmth helps so much. 80-85 f
Offer any tempting foods they will eat. Sometimes offer warm baby burd formula by syringe, many will like it and take it. Make like thick Greek yogurt. 1-3 ml probably all that size bird can take at a time. Adult burds crops don't stretch like babies. Offer.2-3 times a day. Support feeding can help.

Most important is seeing the vet right away so proper medicine can be started.

https://www.littlecrittersvet.com/sick-birds.pml
 
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Rival_of_the_Rickeybird

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Sparklystars

Sparklystars

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Thank you all so much for your help! I plan on taking her asap when the vets open tomorrow (I am in the UK :) ) I have a carrier for her and while she seems to be eating I've noticed I can see her little nose holes which I've read is another sign of ill health :( Thank you all so much for replying, I hope the next time I post it'll be a much happier update!
 

Laurasea

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You might offer baby bird formula by syringe , I used Exact brand. Sick burds burn more than 2 times the amount of calories normally, it can be hard for them to eat enough to keep up. So also offer millet spray, extra seed, things they will eat.
 

abababa

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You need vet pronto.

If you don't have access, then what the vet will likely do, is administer NSAIDs and antibiotics. These can be live-saving.

You can order these online and I'd always recommend having oral versions available (Baytril and Meloxicam); the massive preference is vet, but I realise 'just see the vet' isn't always as viable as it sounds. The generic vet playbook for 'sick bird' is NSAIDs and antibiotics, because it's the statistically most likely way to save a bird that's not obviously injured. Even if it's something they won't treat, like stroke, the risk of administering them is minimal.

It is irrespective the case that a bird that looks sick is gravely ill, because they hide it, and likely to die without intervention.
 
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Sparklystars

Sparklystars

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Hi guys!
Thank you all so much for your advice. I'm now on the bus back from the vets and although the news isnt great, theres some progress being made. They think she has something wrong with her respiratory kind of system, but arent too sure as it could be something unrelated causing the respiratory symptoms. I have some vitamins and calcium to add to her water and some medicine to start her off with. If it doesnt help, we are gonna run a series of tests and xrays. If I could ask for any advice though, how can I give her the syringe of medicine without her hating me? I know I've got to hold her to essentially stop her from wiggling around but she doesnt like being held like that. I've seen things about using a cardboard tube to help hold them? But I'm not sure that's safe and I dont want to injure her. Obviously medicine comes first and if theres no other way other than just holding her in my hand then I'll do it, I'll just have to hope she doesnt hold a grudge for too long like she normally does! (If she ever gets stuck somewhere, like behind the tv, when I have to rescue her (shes never in danger just somewhere she needs a little help) somehow it's my fault she got stuck and she gets in a grump ��)
 

abababa

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Oh just to add, I have to give it to her orally by syringe.

I think first off you need to remind yourself that even if the bird is upset, you're doing the right thing. They obviously can't understand that the (foul-tasting!) medicine you're administering is going to make them better; but in experience they also tend to forgive you within 20 minutes if you have some delicious seeds.

Administering by syringe is fairly straightforward but the risk is them not taking the medicine. You want to basically 'harass' them with the syringe, so they bite it, then slowly inject, which forces them to swallow.

As with all things with birds, you want to be slow, and gentle. Usually you'd want to hold them on their back with the neck secured with your first two fingers. If they're hard to catch like this, take them into a dark room whilst they're on your shoulder/arm - they won't resist/fly if they can't identify an escape route.

The most important thing is you check they've swallowed the dose. Try to make sure they've bitten the syringe tip as if it's on the side of the beak they'll wipe it off.
 

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