Head Trauma, excessive thirst and throwing up water

Vecna19x

New member
Apr 8, 2023
3
16
Parrots
A quaker named Apollo
Hi, I'm new to this forum, just made an account because we're desperate and I don't know who and where to ask anymore.

Last week my quaker, Apollo, had a house incident which resulted in head trauma. X-rays showed nothing broken, he has no respiratory issues and no motor issues. We brought him home with a NSAIDs prescription to give him for five days.

But since then he's been sleeping a lot during the day, albeit being very alert and responding very well to stimuli while he is. He preens, he self scritches, he stretches his wings, he responds to our singing by standing to attention and giving us kisses, he guards me and my mother from my father, he still doesn't like us handling the tv remote. And he vocalizes, even though he of course doesn't sing.
He also seems to be more active than he should be at night.

Issue is, besides these moments, in his active phases he does nothing but look for food and water. Drank so much water at first his droppings looked like lakes.
That settled down a little in the following days but now he's started to regurgitate. First it was only at night, and since he was eating a lot we thought it was because he was gorging.
Then he started doing it around midday too and the vet prescribed him an antiemetic.

Neither oral Plasil nor intramuscular Cerenia worked, he still throws up. He tested negative to infections, still throws up. Mostly water these two days, he drinks and few seconds later throws it back up. It doesn't last the whole day, just a few select hours.

We're now trying to have him eat foods with lots of water to compensate for it but we don't know what else to do, our vet says a case like that after head trauma she had never seen til now and she'd be asking around and researching more.

Has anyone here seen something like this before? Is there anything I can do to help him through this while we figure it out?
 

Cottonoid

Supporting Member
Parrot of the Month 🏆
Feb 20, 2022
3,131
10,896
Welcome to the forum!

I'm sorry Apollo still isn't feeling the best. I don't have any experience with vomiting so hopefully others will chime in.

I'm glad that your vet sounds like they're also concerned and are trying to figure this out.
 

wrench13

Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Parrot of the Month 🏆
Nov 22, 2015
11,293
Media
14
Albums
2
12,386
Isle of Long, NY
Parrots
Yellow Shoulder Amazon, Salty
Sounds like mild concussion symptoms. These should start to dissipate over time, but work with your vet if you trust them. Something like this where the prognosis is not definite, I might seek a second opinion if a qualified vet is available in your area. Good luck to you and Appolo.
 
OP
V

Vecna19x

New member
Apr 8, 2023
3
16
Parrots
A quaker named Apollo
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #4
Unfortunately we don't have many other avian vets close nearby. There is one but she was unfortunately home this week, COVID positive. If everything goes well we should be able to reach her next week though, we'll see what she can tell us.

On the bright side, Apollo was doing better today, ate and drank in relatively normal amounts, less ravenously than he was doing previous days, and he hasn't regurgitated food nor water yet so let's hope this good spell holds through the night and keeps getting better in the coming days.

Thank you guys a lot for your answers and your good wishes, I really hope to be able to give good news soon
 
OP
V

Vecna19x

New member
Apr 8, 2023
3
16
Parrots
A quaker named Apollo
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
Hello! It's been almost three months since the accident happened, but I finally have some good news to share in case anyone might be going through something similar.

Apollo had worsened considerably over the week following my last post, to the point we thought he might not make it in time for the appointment we had took with the other avian vet: he had stopped preening, he had stopped stretching, just spent most of the day in an almost comatose state. He still ate and drank a lot.

The day right before the appointment he started looking more alive, eyes once again wide open and alert and he spent more time awake, which gave us hope again. Still eating and drinking a lot.

The new vet took another xray and she found a small foreign object in his proventriculus that the previous vet hadn't noticed, and his liver was also fairly enlarged when compared to the first radiography. She prescribed lactulose and liver support integrators.
We also ran some blood tests and tested for metal poisoning signs but found none, other vets she consulted thought it may have been a little pebble rather than a metallic object, so back to square one. They tested for occult parasites in feces, tested for thyroid problems, everything was fine.

At that point, the only hypothesis left was either post-traumatic Diabetes Insipidus or a damage to the hypothalamus, where hunger and thirst centers reside.

In between tests and waiting for results, Pollo's conditions kept improving day by day. He started preening again, taking baths, flying around, playing and interacting with the environment and with us. He reacts especially well to music, trying to sing along and moving his head at rhythm. He's started to repeat some sounds and words again, even though he's not yet able to fully whistle tunes like he did before.
He seems to be eating normally again now, but still drinks up to 70/100ml of water every day and there's still a lot of urine in his droppings.
Vet said at this point the polydipsia may very well have become a stereotyped behavior.

So in short, we ran every test we could and came up with nothing. We don't really know what happened following the trauma. But Apollo's doing so much better we can hardly believe it and we have good hopes it'll get even better.

Thank you all for your answers and good wishes!
 

Most Reactions

Latest posts

Top