Help -Rehoming?

JGarza57

New member
Jul 6, 2019
49
9
Pasadena, Tx
I have a red crown parrot, i picked him up under a palm tree since he seemed to not be able to fly and it was near a busy intersection. I have been having him since July 2019. I had never had a bird when i took him in my dog had passed away the day before and my thought process was not about keeping the bird but rather helping an animal since i could no longer help my own. I hand feed him baby formula and watched/read many articles and videos about having a bird. Before i knew it i was attached and i bought him all the supplies he needed (a cage, toys, food and snacks, etc.). I would let him do wtv he wanted being that i just cant say no to animals but here i am almost 2 years later and i seem to have no patience at times. He spends his day flying free in my room and will only be put in his cage in the livingroom or at night (sleeps in my room). I cannot leave my room without him screaming even if ive been with him for hours and when i take him to the livingroom with me and my family he will scream 75% of the time which causes me to take him to my room. I’ve had to cover all my dressers and drawers and tv with towels bc he will destroy and bite wood, tv or anything i have out. I have thought about rehoming him for a while because maybe im not the best fit for him, there has to be someone out there that can give him a better life, maybe someone who has other birds/more experience. He can be soo sweet with me and will fly to me but theres times he will be very aggressive and scream and bites. I’ve thought of maybe going to a professional trainer that could possible help me and make things work with me and him. I love him dearly more than i ever thought i could love “a simple bird” and everytime i think about rehoming or i read others rehoming stories i simply break down in tears. The thought that what if someone else rehomes him or he becomes depressed roams through my mind or what if they treat him bad that would no longer be my place to have an opinion nor would i have knowledge being that id be doing the same (possible rehoming him) just breaks me. I try and have patience with him as much as i can but theres times where i just have to walk away. Ive only ever owned dogs and ive never given any pet ive had away not even have a thought about it and the fact that i do occasionally think about rehoming my parrot makes me feel like such an awful person. The thought that when i found him i should have taken him to a rescue place near me haunts me everyday. I dont know what to do, i would rather feel guilt and sadness of letting him go as long as i know he will be taken care of in ways that maybe i never could.:green1:
 
Last edited:

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
9,645
999
USA
Parrots
Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
It could be he was part of a wild population , they are endangered.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlsc...rrots-in-us-cities-than-in-all-of-mexico/amp/
Their might be a breeding program that you could donate him to?

Screaming takes some effort to turn around, and often a multilayer approach.

The first steps are usually a large cage with lots if things to destroy. Teaching foraging. Increasing out of cage time. Redirection, patterning, reinforcement of postive behavior, ignoring unwanted behavior.

But the meeting all the parrot needs has the biggest impact. The rest is shaping abd tweaking.

Having a parrot is a huge commitment, and does take a lot if sacrifice and work.

I understand you tried to save him, and that's only human. I support you in rehome. I understand getting in over your head, abd looking at 50 year commitment.

I'm really hoping he can be part if a breeding situation since they are endangered. I dint know if a zoo would take him? Many times zoos are part if conservation efforts.

This is in California. But you could contact them , maybe tgey xsn make recommendations
https://mlahvet.com/2018/02/meet-the-3-amigos/
 
Last edited:

smwboxer

New member
May 31, 2020
26
3
San Juan Cosala, MX
Parrots
Mealy Amazon - George
Double Yellowhead - Fred
It could be he was part of a wild population , they are endangered.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlsc...rrots-in-us-cities-than-in-all-of-mexico/amp/
Their might be a breeding program that you could donate him to?

Screaming takes some effort to turn around, and often a multilayer approach.

The first steps are usually a large cage with lots if things to destroy. Teaching foraging. Increasing out of cage time. Redirection, patterning, reinforcement of postive behavior, ignoring unwanted behavior.



But the meeting all the parrot needs has the biggest impact. The rest is shaping abd tweaking.

Having a parrot is a huge commitment, and does take a lot if sacrifice and work.

I understand you tried to save him, and that's only human. I support you in rehome. I understand getting in over your head, abd looking at 50 year commitment.

I'm really hoping he can be part if a breeding situation since they are endangered. I dint know if a zoo would take him? Many times zoos are part if conservation efforts.

This is in California. But you could contact them , maybe tgey xsn make recommendations
https://mlahvet.com/2018/02/meet-the-3-amigos/

While They are endangered in their Mexican natural habit, they are very common in captivity and CA, TX, and FL have large feral colonies who’s populations actually exceed those in Mexico. Because of this I don’t believe there is any organization breeding them for return to Mexico. Would be much easier to trap some feral birds for return as they already have the skills needed to survive in the wild.
 

noodles123

Well-known member
Jul 11, 2018
8,141
148
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
It does sound like these behaviors could be minimized (in comparison to where they are right now) with the proper patience, enrichment and behavioral training, but they definitely are a ton of work and they are messy and destructive...Reducing attention-screaming means waiting out multi-hour scream fests that could last for a long time and get worse before they get better. The screaming thing is a common problem and can get super bad unless you respond to it properly--- either way, it's a process and will never go away completely, but can be decreased substantially with ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis).


1. Is your parrot getting 10 hours sleep on a schedule nightly? Under 10 messes with their hormones, mood and immunity.
2. How is diet? High sugar or carb diets can amplify behaviors.
3. Do people enter the room, look at the bird, talk to the bird or react in any way (whatsoever) to the screaming? Reactions= talking about it, saying the birds name, changing human behavior to compensate for screaming (e.g., yelling to be heard while the bird is screaming, moving your bird, looking at your bird, entering the room while the screaming is still happening, moving closer to the bird etc?) If anyone enters the room who wasn't already there (during a scream fest) the bird is going to take that as a win ASSUMING the screaming is attention-seeking...but before assuming that, you have to make sure sleep, diet, hormones etc are all in check.
4. When you pet, do you stick to head and neck only? If not, you should, as petting elsewhere is a sexual/hormonal trigger.
5. Does your bird frequently access shadowy spaces like huts, tents, boxes, drawers, bedding, under furniture etc? If so, stop allowing that access, as shadowy spaces are a major hormonal trigger (as is petting anywhere other than the head and neck) and with hormones, you end up getting behavioral issues..which is why you have to make sure basic needs are being met before jumping into behavior analysis.
6. How much time does he spend out of his cage daily?
7. Does he have toys that he uses? If so, what kind? They do need to be taught to play with toys and are often scared of new ones, so a gradual introduction (before just plopping them in the cage) is important for some birds.
8. How big is his cage? A cage that is too small or lacking in stimulation can also lead to screaming.
9. When you leave the room and as you do things around the house, are you using key words and phrases so that your bird learns to associate words with routine and can better anticipate your return?
10. Before the screaming starts, do you try to prevent it by talking to your bird room-to-room. If not, you should. Never respond once the screaming starts and when it stops, make sure you do a slow count to 10 or so before re-entering...In general, all bad behavior (unless you know the exact cause) should be ignored. If screaming is happening, you shouldn't come back into the room or provide attention until it stops for a set period of time. Let's say you are in the room and bird starts screaming at you. Don't look at your bird or speak to it, don't approach etc. I would walk out of the room, or stay in there with my back turned (with earplugs) until the screaming stops for a solid 10 seconds. If that is too hard, try 8 to start. The second the screaming begins, wait for it to stop. You will then count in your head (1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi, 3 Mississippi... until 10). Any screaming that happens before 10 seconds will restart your silent count--- so, you have to start back at 1 the next time there is a break in the screaming and don't attend to your bird until it stops for the set period of time. At 10 s of silence, come in and praise your bird for being quiet using a quiet voice. No new people should enter the room during screaming and those who cannot ignore it should leave the room rather than reacting. This only applies to attention screaming, not fear or screaming from pain/illness (which is totally different). If you decide this is attention seeking (after correcting any issues with diet, sleep, cage size, hormones etc) then make sure that everyone is 100% on-board---if you leave your cell-phone or keys in the bird room and he starts screaming, you must wait it out until he is silent for 10 s, because entering during the scream-fest will reward an attention-seeker (even if your reason for entering was totally unrelated to the screaming itself).
11. If your bird makes a sound other than a scream to get your attention, do you make it a point of providing immediate attention for more preferred sounds? If not, you should.
12. Have you tried station training to cut back on destruction? You can train them to stay in an assigned area (although it's not fool-proof, obviously). That is another reason to have portable play-stands.
12b-If you don't want him chewing furniture, have you made it a point to introduce him to a variety of acceptable chewing options (in conjunction with station training)?
13. Do you have multiple (or portable) play-stands in the home so that he has a designated spaces with thing to chew of his own in multiple rooms?
14. Do you ever leave for super short periods and then re-enter right BEFORE the screaming starts and reward the quiet (using the same phrase, like, "good waiting" or "thanks for staying quiet". I tell my bird "wait" etc when I hear her talking from the other room. She almost always talks before getting to the point of screaming because I praise and attend to any talking but ignore screaming. Ive worked with her a lot on it for years, but these days, when I step away and she is feeling social, this is the progression of what I hear: "hi", "hello baby", "big bird", "I love you", "wanna look outside", "hop up", "come here", "COME HERE", "BACK BACK BACK", "AHHAHHAHHHHAHHHAHHH!!!!!" If I can respond or re-enter BEFORE it gets to the screaming, then it rewards the preferred vocalizations and prevents having to wait out a scream-session with the counting trick etc.
15. Birds are flock animals and need a ton of interaction. If you are keeping him in your room or excluding him from family (flock) activities, he is going to scream to try and get your attention. They need at least 3 hours out of the cage and at least an hour or so of really focused/direct interaction (involving shared games, puzzles etc-- some of this time can be petting, but you don't want to make petting your primary form of interaction, as it can become sexual in a captive parrot if your only direct interaction is petting. You should try and get the whole family involved and keep him in the hub of the home. If the hub is too noisy for him to sleep, a smaller sleep cage (or another cage in general that can fit in a sleep space) is advised-- one that can be placed in a quieter/darker area. If your bird is covered in the main area of the house and people are still talking/laughing/ shuffling things around or walking by the cage, your bird may be quiet, but it is very unlikely that he is actually sleeping.


If you re-home, I would just be very careful about who you give him to. If you do it without an adoption/foster/rescue, I would make sure that the person you re-home him to has a lot of experience with parrots, and if they send you videos or pictures of their home, I would ask them to hold a sign with a code-phrase or something on it so that you know it is actually them and not someone using someone else's images/videos. If they currently have other birds, hopefully they are already aware of the importance of a 45 day quarantine. Reverse image searches are also hepful in determining whether a photo belongs to someone, as opposed to having been recycled from someone else's posts/images on the internet.


If you re-home him to the right person, I am sure he will be okay. I won't say that re-homing isn't hard on them, but as you said, if you can't provide him the life he needs, then re-homing may be for the best. My U2 had 3 homes before me and she's only 14--it took her a bit to come around, but she is pretty happy with me even though she was with one of her homes for over 4 years.
 
Last edited:

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
9,645
999
USA
Parrots
Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
It could be he was part of a wild population , they are endangered.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlsc...rrots-in-us-cities-than-in-all-of-mexico/amp/
Their might be a breeding program that you could donate him to?

Screaming takes some effort to turn around, and often a multilayer approach.

The first steps are usually a large cage with lots if things to destroy. Teaching foraging. Increasing out of cage time. Redirection, patterning, reinforcement of postive behavior, ignoring unwanted behavior.



But the meeting all the parrot needs has the biggest impact. The rest is shaping abd tweaking.

Having a parrot is a huge commitment, and does take a lot if sacrifice and work.

I understand you tried to save him, and that's only human. I support you in rehome. I understand getting in over your head, abd looking at 50 year commitment.

I'm really hoping he can be part if a breeding situation since they are endangered. I dint know if a zoo would take him? Many times zoos are part if conservation efforts.

This is in California. But you could contact them , maybe tgey xsn make recommendations
https://mlahvet.com/2018/02/meet-the-3-amigos/

While They are endangered in their Mexican natural habit, they are very common in captivity and CA, TX, and FL have large feral colonies who’s populations actually exceed those in Mexico. Because of this I don’t believe there is any organization breeding them for return to Mexico. Would be much easier to trap some feral birds for return as they already have the skills needed to survive in the wild.

Lol, I shared the article, so I read thst. But they are still endangered. I'm nit talking about releasing him, but for him to be part of a captive breeding program for genetic diversity. I have a zoo vet contact I can check with , if you decide to rehome.

All of us can try and provide info and guidance if you are trying to keep him .
 

texsize

Supporting Member
Oct 23, 2015
2,621
Media
2
123
so-cal
Parrots
1 YNA (Bingo)
1 OWA (Plumas R.I.P.)
1 RLA (Pacho R.I.P.)
2 GCA(Luna,Merlin) The Twins
1 Congo AG (Bella)
5 Cockatiels
I have 2 of the same species of amazon as you are dealing with.

The Palm tree was most likely the nesting sight and fell/was pushed out of the nest.
In So Cal we have flocks of wild (red crown aka Mexican Red headed aka green cheek amazon) and that's one of there prime nesting trees.

One of my two was a rescue found on the sidewalk of San Diego.
I am listening to them screaming right now.
Mostly I have the same experience you have. as long as I (or someone else in the family) sits close to them they stay relatively quiet. If I go into the kitchen to fix something the screaming begins almost at once.

Just about all parrots scream. If it's something that the family just can't stand finding another home might be best. These guys are real screamers.

Check with local Avian vets if there are no parrot rescues around.
 

texsize

Supporting Member
Oct 23, 2015
2,621
Media
2
123
so-cal
Parrots
1 YNA (Bingo)
1 OWA (Plumas R.I.P.)
1 RLA (Pacho R.I.P.)
2 GCA(Luna,Merlin) The Twins
1 Congo AG (Bella)
5 Cockatiels
It could be he was part of a wild population , they are endangered.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlsc...rrots-in-us-cities-than-in-all-of-mexico/amp/
Their might be a breeding program that you could donate him to?

Screaming takes some effort to turn around, and often a multilayer approach.

The first steps are usually a large cage with lots if things to destroy. Teaching foraging. Increasing out of cage time. Redirection, patterning, reinforcement of postive behavior, ignoring unwanted behavior.



But the meeting all the parrot needs has the biggest impact. The rest is shaping abd tweaking.

Having a parrot is a huge commitment, and does take a lot if sacrifice and work.

I understand you tried to save him, and that's only human. I support you in rehome. I understand getting in over your head, abd looking at 50 year commitment.

I'm really hoping he can be part if a breeding situation since they are endangered. I dint know if a zoo would take him? Many times zoos are part if conservation efforts.

This is in California. But you could contact them , maybe tgey xsn make recommendations
https://mlahvet.com/2018/02/meet-the-3-amigos/

While They are endangered in their Mexican natural habit, they are very common in captivity and CA, TX, and FL have large feral colonies who’s populations actually exceed those in Mexico. Because of this I don’t believe there is any organization breeding them for return to Mexico. Would be much easier to trap some feral birds for return as they already have the skills needed to survive in the wild.

Lol, I shared the article, so I read thst. But they are still endangered. I'm nit talking about releasing him, but for him to be part of a captive breeding program for genetic diversity. I have a zoo vet contact I can check with , if you decide to rehome.

All of us can try and provide info and guidance if you are trying to keep him .

Do NOT release him into the wild he wont know how to survive.
and I think it is illegal to do so.
 
OP
J

JGarza57

New member
Jul 6, 2019
49
9
Pasadena, Tx
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #8
It could be he was part of a wild population , they are endangered.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlsc...rrots-in-us-cities-than-in-all-of-mexico/amp/
Their might be a breeding program that you could donate him to?

Screaming takes some effort to turn around, and often a multilayer approach.

The first steps are usually a large cage with lots if things to destroy. Teaching foraging. Increasing out of cage time. Redirection, patterning, reinforcement of postive behavior, ignoring unwanted behavior.

But the meeting all the parrot needs has the biggest impact. The rest is shaping abd tweaking.

Having a parrot is a huge commitment, and does take a lot if sacrifice and work.

I understand you tried to save him, and that's only human. I support you in rehome. I understand getting in over your head, abd looking at 50 year commitment.

I'm really hoping he can be part if a breeding situation since they are endangered. I dint know if a zoo would take him? Many times zoos are part if conservation efforts.

This is in California. But you could contact them , maybe tgey xsn make recommendations
https://mlahvet.com/2018/02/meet-the-3-amigos/
Thank you for the response, it is a big commitment (i’ve learned that now) his cage is not the biggest but it is also not small (its medium size) he mostly spends his time in my room and will only be place in the cage at night and when my family is in the living room. When i first started researching about parrots i did learn that they were classified as endangered.

Thank you for the links!
 
OP
J

JGarza57

New member
Jul 6, 2019
49
9
Pasadena, Tx
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #9
It could be he was part of a wild population , they are endangered.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlsc...rrots-in-us-cities-than-in-all-of-mexico/amp/
Their might be a breeding program that you could donate him to?

Screaming takes some effort to turn around, and often a multilayer approach.

The first steps are usually a large cage with lots if things to destroy. Teaching foraging. Increasing out of cage time. Redirection, patterning, reinforcement of postive behavior, ignoring unwanted behavior.



But the meeting all the parrot needs has the biggest impact. The rest is shaping abd tweaking.

Having a parrot is a huge commitment, and does take a lot if sacrifice and work.

I understand you tried to save him, and that's only human. I support you in rehome. I understand getting in over your head, abd looking at 50 year commitment.

I'm really hoping he can be part if a breeding situation since they are endangered. I dint know if a zoo would take him? Many times zoos are part if conservation efforts.

This is in California. But you could contact them , maybe tgey xsn make recommendations
https://mlahvet.com/2018/02/meet-the-3-amigos/

While They are endangered in their Mexican natural habit, they are very common in captivity and CA, TX, and FL have large feral colonies who’s populations actually exceed those in Mexico. Because of this I don’t believe there is any organization breeding them for return to Mexico. Would be much easier to trap some feral birds for return as they already have the skills needed to survive in the wild.

I live in Houston, Tx and he was found in McAllen,Tx which is very close to the border. After having him for almost 2 years, he would NOT survive in the wild on his own.
 

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
9,645
999
USA
Parrots
Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
I never suggested returning him to the wild...not sure how that tangent took off.

Have you decided to keep him? Any changes ir improvements?
 
OP
J

JGarza57

New member
Jul 6, 2019
49
9
Pasadena, Tx
  • Thread Starter
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  • #11
It does sound like these behaviors could be minimized (in comparison to where they are right now) with the proper patience, enrichment and behavioral training, but they definitely are a ton of work and they are messy and destructive...Reducing attention-screaming means waiting out multi-hour scream fests that could last for a long time and get worse before they get better. The screaming thing is a common problem and can get super bad unless you respond to it properly--- either way, it's a process and will never go away completely, but can be decreased substantially with ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis).


1. Is your parrot getting 10 hours sleep on a schedule nightly? Under 10 messes with their hormones, mood and immunity.
2. How is diet? High sugar or carb diets can amplify behaviors.
3. Do people enter the room, look at the bird, talk to the bird or react in any way (whatsoever) to the screaming? Reactions= talking about it, saying the birds name, changing human behavior to compensate for screaming (e.g., yelling to be heard while the bird is screaming, moving your bird, looking at your bird, entering the room while the screaming is still happening, moving closer to the bird etc?) If anyone enters the room who wasn't already there (during a scream fest) the bird is going to take that as a win ASSUMING the screaming is attention-seeking...but before assuming that, you have to make sure sleep, diet, hormones etc are all in check.
4. When you pet, do you stick to head and neck only? If not, you should, as petting elsewhere is a sexual/hormonal trigger.
5. Does your bird frequently access shadowy spaces like huts, tents, boxes, drawers, bedding, under furniture etc? If so, stop allowing that access, as shadowy spaces are a major hormonal trigger (as is petting anywhere other than the head and neck) and with hormones, you end up getting behavioral issues..which is why you have to make sure basic needs are being met before jumping into behavior analysis.
6. How much time does he spend out of his cage daily?
7. Does he have toys that he uses? If so, what kind? They do need to be taught to play with toys and are often scared of new ones, so a gradual introduction (before just plopping them in the cage) is important for some birds.
8. How big is his cage? A cage that is too small or lacking in stimulation can also lead to screaming.
9. When you leave the room and as you do things around the house, are you using key words and phrases so that your bird learns to associate words with routine and can better anticipate your return?
10. Before the screaming starts, do you try to prevent it by talking to your bird room-to-room. If not, you should. Never respond once the screaming starts and when it stops, make sure you do a slow count to 10 or so before re-entering...In general, all bad behavior (unless you know the exact cause) should be ignored. If screaming is happening, you shouldn't come back into the room or provide attention until it stops for a set period of time. Let's say you are in the room and bird starts screaming at you. Don't look at your bird or speak to it, don't approach etc. I would walk out of the room, or stay in there with my back turned (with earplugs) until the screaming stops for a solid 10 seconds. If that is too hard, try 8 to start. The second the screaming begins, wait for it to stop. You will then count in your head (1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi, 3 Mississippi... until 10). Any screaming that happens before 10 seconds will restart your silent count--- so, you have to start back at 1 the next time there is a break in the screaming and don't attend to your bird until it stops for the set period of time. At 10 s of silence, come in and praise your bird for being quiet using a quiet voice. No new people should enter the room during screaming and those who cannot ignore it should leave the room rather than reacting. This only applies to attention screaming, not fear or screaming from pain/illness (which is totally different). If you decide this is attention seeking (after correcting any issues with diet, sleep, cage size, hormones etc) then make sure that everyone is 100% on-board---if you leave your cell-phone or keys in the bird room and he starts screaming, you must wait it out until he is silent for 10 s, because entering during the scream-fest will reward an attention-seeker (even if your reason for entering was totally unrelated to the screaming itself).
11. If your bird makes a sound other than a scream to get your attention, do you make it a point of providing immediate attention for more preferred sounds? If not, you should.
12. Have you tried station training to cut back on destruction? You can train them to stay in an assigned area (although it's not fool-proof, obviously). That is another reason to have portable play-stands.
12b-If you don't want him chewing furniture, have you made it a point to introduce him to a variety of acceptable chewing options (in conjunction with station training)?
13. Do you have multiple (or portable) play-stands in the home so that he has a designated spaces with thing to chew of his own in multiple rooms?
14. Do you ever leave for super short periods and then re-enter right BEFORE the screaming starts and reward the quiet (using the same phrase, like, "good waiting" or "thanks for staying quiet". I tell my bird "wait" etc when I hear her talking from the other room. She almost always talks before getting to the point of screaming because I praise and attend to any talking but ignore screaming. Ive worked with her a lot on it for years, but these days, when I step away and she is feeling social, this is the progression of what I hear: "hi", "hello baby", "big bird", "I love you", "wanna look outside", "hop up", "come here", "COME HERE", "BACK BACK BACK", "AHHAHHAHHHHAHHHAHHH!!!!!" If I can respond or re-enter BEFORE it gets to the screaming, then it rewards the preferred vocalizations and prevents having to wait out a scream-session with the counting trick etc.
15. Birds are flock animals and need a ton of interaction. If you are keeping him in your room or excluding him from family (flock) activities, he is going to scream to try and get your attention. They need at least 3 hours out of the cage and at least an hour or so of really focused/direct interaction (involving shared games, puzzles etc-- some of this time can be petting, but you don't want to make petting your primary form of interaction, as it can become sexual in a captive parrot if your only direct interaction is petting. You should try and get the whole family involved and keep him in the hub of the home. If the hub is too noisy for him to sleep, a smaller sleep cage (or another cage in general that can fit in a sleep space) is advised-- one that can be placed in a quieter/darker area. If your bird is covered in the main area of the house and people are still talking/laughing/ shuffling things around or walking by the cage, your bird may be quiet, but it is very unlikely that he is actually sleeping.


If you re-home, I would just be very careful about who you give him to. If you do it without an adoption/foster/rescue, I would make sure that the person you re-home him to has a lot of experience with parrots, and if they send you videos or pictures of their home, I would ask them to hold a sign with a code-phrase or something on it so that you know it is actually them and not someone using someone else's images/videos. If they currently have other birds, hopefully they are already aware of the importance of a 45 day quarantine. Reverse image searches are also hepful in determining whether a photo belongs to someone, as opposed to having been recycled from someone else's posts/images on the internet.


If you re-home him to the right person, I am sure he will be okay. I won't say that re-homing isn't hard on them, but as you said, if you can't provide him the life he needs, then re-homing may be for the best. My U2 had 3 homes before me and she's only 14--it took her a bit to come around, but she is pretty happy with me even though she was with one of her homes for over 4 years.

Thank you so much for all this valuable information.

He does have wooden toys to “mimic” my furniture but still finds it okay to continue destroying my dresser, tv stand etc (which now i know is “normal” behavior for them but uggh). I try to have him interact outside the room with my family (in his cage) and theres moments he will be fine but others the screaming wont stop and i simply put him back into my room. I give him as much time as i have especially right now that i am not working but truth is, i stop myself from doing many things just to work around his time and such which is okay up to a certain point but since i got him a month before graduating college i have not pursued my degree nor other jobs because he NEEDS attention, the only job i’ve had is a stay at home job (which is not what i want) i am 21 years old and i find myself not exploring options of a future because i feel guilty for leaving him home for 8-10 hrs.
 
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JGarza57

New member
Jul 6, 2019
49
9
Pasadena, Tx
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  • #12
I have 2 of the same species of amazon as you are dealing with.

The Palm tree was most likely the nesting sight and fell/was pushed out of the nest.
In So Cal we have flocks of wild (red crown aka Mexican Red headed aka green cheek amazon) and that's one of there prime nesting trees.

One of my two was a rescue found on the sidewalk of San Diego.
I am listening to them screaming right now.
Mostly I have the same experience you have. as long as I (or someone else in the family) sits close to them they stay relatively quiet. If I go into the kitchen to fix something the screaming begins almost at once.

Just about all parrots scream. If it's something that the family just can't stand finding another home might be best. These guys are real screamers.

Check with local Avian vets if there are no parrot rescues around.

When i took him to the vet, the vet said he was 1-3 yrs old (that was almost 2 years ago) so he is very young. Honestly i dont mind his chirping and mimicking sounds its the constant non stop screaming that there are days where i cant deal with them.
 
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JGarza57

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Jul 6, 2019
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Pasadena, Tx
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  • #13
I never suggested returning him to the wild...not sure how that tangent took off.

Have you decided to keep him? Any changes ir improvements?

He is still here, he is currently playing with some of his toys, but nothing has improved. I’ve bough him more toys and different types of toys but honestly my room is small, like i said previously his cage is medium size but since he is hardly in there i dont think of that as much. I wish i had the space for him, that maybe in a way bigger cage he would be happier, maybe a different enviroment would make him happy. I love him so much and the thought of rehoming him breaks me into pieces because ive never thought about giving away a pet (ive only ever owned dogs) but sometimes i wonder if someone out there with more experience, maybe even more birds could make him happier in ways that i cannot. I feel like since im the only one in the house to be there for his needs and play time and such i hold myself back from even a decent job. I feel like even someone who has a decent job BUT has more birds and such could be a better distraction for him rather than just him staying in my room alone when im gone (he is loose in my room when i got to the store or gym).
 

Laurasea

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Aug 2, 2018
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Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
I hope you are able to find a lovely home. Your situation is unique. I hope you can feel good in saving him and providing a stepping stone to his new life.

For this to hold you back from your dreams, and feelings of letting him down. It sounds like parting ways might be best gir both of you. I've seen to many parrots held onto from feelings of guilt....then finally re homed, when it would have been kindwr to re home sooner. Other members have found themselves in a situation and re homed.
 
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JGarza57

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Pasadena, Tx
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I hope you are able to find a lovely home. Your situation is unique. I hope you can feel good in saving him and providing a stepping stone to his new life.

For this to hold you back from your dreams, and feelings of letting him down. It sounds like parting ways might be best gir both of you. I've seen to many parrots held onto from feelings of guilt....then finally re homed, when it would have been kindwr to re home sooner. Other members have found themselves in a situation and re homed.

Thank you, its really hard for me to even think about it because if i keep him i dont just want him to be just there in the “background” if i purse a 8-10 hr job, he deserves better. i want him to have that attention and space either from a person or its surrounding.
 
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JGarza57

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Pasadena, Tx
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Today i went for a job interview and i got hired, i dont start until next week but the schedule is 9am-9pm one day and the rest (4 days) are 9am-6pm or 11am-9pm. Im going to see how i manage the job while keeping him and see how he reacts to those long hours of being alone!
 

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
9,645
999
USA
Parrots
Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
Congratulations!!
Teaching foraging helps fill their time.
 

noodles123

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Jul 11, 2018
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Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
Try your very best to still make sure his bedtime and wake-up get him a minimum of 10 hours sleep nightly--even with this new job...Remember, he still needs at least a few hours out with you each day.
 

blaccfxiry

New member
Sep 1, 2021
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Indian ringneck
Try your very best to still make sure his bedtime and wake-up get him a minimum of 10 hours sleep nightly--even with this new job...Remember, he still needs at least a few hours out with you each day.
Hi are you still looking for a home for him ? if not I hope he’s doing well :)
 

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