I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

GaleriaGila

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Can other parrots become "Honorary Amazons"... ever?
You could make a standardized test! Or an application process? Maybe a Skype interview...
 
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SailBoat

SailBoat

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Can other parrots become "Honorary Amazons"... ever?
You could make a standardized test! Or an application process? Maybe a Skype interview...

Thank-you, for expressing an interest in the Amazona World of Truly Superior Parrots.

Please know that your inquiry(s) is important to us and has been noted and provided to the appropriate committee.

In speaking with one of our Honored Leaders. I have been informed that it has been many years since a sub-species had been added to the 'Family Amazona,' and that special meeting occurred prior to his appointment.

His quick review of the minutes found that several Parrot Species applying for a 'Group Inclusion' of the Caribbean Island "Amazons" many years ago. As the meeting extended over several days, the minutes became more difficult to follow. At one point there was mention of the waning supply of something referred to as "Island Standard Rum" that the applying Parrot Species has brought with them. He was unaware of what that was or how it effected the proceedings. Long Story Short; Approvals came about shortly after that notation.

Regarding inclusion of "Honorary Amazons," he stated that he is not involved with that area of activity and that as stated above, it has been provided to the appropriate committee.

Again, Thank-You for your Inquiry. Once, the appropriate committee has met, I will reply with their findings.

Best Regards,
Amazon Staff Person, SailBoat
 

GaleriaGila

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I have not had such an elegant, warmly imperious communique since Princeton rejected me way back when. Hey... do Amazons run Princeton? Maybe the F.B.I.? This would explain some things.

I shall await. If accepted, maybe the Rickeybird will have more luck finding "big hot hens what nose how to party", if I recall correctly.
 
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SailBoat

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Our Amazon is deathly afraid of any new perch we get him. It is like we just introduced the plague into his home, he gets super offended, stares, and growls at me for about two days. Then out of nowhere, it is like that perch has been there is whole life and he won't leave it for like two days. He is such a character!![/QUOTE]

New Things Just Showing Up!


It is very common for Parrots, as a group, to not being overly happy when 'something' just shows-up in their World! When new things need to be introduced, it is better to have them 'work their way into your Amazon's World.' This allows the Amazon to notice it and within several days accept that this 'thing' is allowed into its World. Start from some distance away and with time, have this 'new thing' work its way into the its final location.

Note: There are always exceptions with some Amazons totally unconcerned with 'new things' showing up and others that seem to go off the deep end. So, depending of where on that Bell Shaped Curve your Parrot is, adjust based on your history.

The Real Estate Agents Tour: Once a month and sometimes more frequently, I take my Amazon on the Real Estate Agents Tour of our Home. As part of the tour, in which I point out every land mark, things to avoid while flying and flight path in the home. I also, point out anything that is difference since the last tour. Our Amazon sees it as One on One Time and I get to assure that he is fully aware of his World.

Another approach is to have your Amazon be part of the 'new thing' coming into its World. Lets say that you have been wanting to make a major change to the 'stuff' in your Amazons cage. Well, have your Amazon be part of the removal of the existing stuff and also part of the placement of the new stuff. Remember that the new stuff has been collecting in your Amazon's area for the past week or so.
 
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SailBoat

SailBoat

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I have not had such an elegant, warmly imperious communique since Princeton rejected me way back when. Hey... do Amazons run Princeton? Maybe the F.B.I.? This would explain some things.

I shall await. If accepted, maybe the Rickeybird will have more luck finding "big hot hens what nose how to party", if I recall correctly.

Again, and Thank-you, for expressing an interest in the Amazona World of Truly Superior Parrots.

Please know that your additional inquiry(s) is important to us and has been noted and provided to the appropriate committee.

In further speaking with one of our Honored Leaders. He stated that he could neither 'Confirm nor Deny' the organization's ownership of specific units of High Education. Regarding connection or involvement the the United States F.B.I. Agency, He stated: No Comment!

A question did come back from the Chairparrot of the Committee on Home Range Security regarding the individual that you are representing: You say the individual's Name is RickeyBird, Correct?

Again, Thank-You for your Inquiry. Once, the appropriate committee has met, I will reply with their findings.

Best Regards,
Amazon Staff Person, SailBoat
 

GaleriaGila

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The Rickeybird, 37-year-old Patagonian Conure
Dear Sir!
I am suddenly seeing Amazonian figures in clouds and shadows, and songs and ads on the radio seem to be giving me messages ("Everybody's Heard about the Bird", "Amazon.com - and you're done", "See something? Say something!" Let me just say this: The Rickeybird (Richard The Bird) and I are completely resolved and accepting of Amazon coolness. That's why he wanted to look into becoming an honorary goodfella. He figures he might (consulting my notes here) "meet some nice big hens", "partay wit some sunflower seedz", and "play vet if you no what I mean". In exchange, Mr. Bird hopes he might have skills and support to offer concerning (back to my notes) "how to get down", "whatsup", "bitin the eyeballs outta somebody", interpretive covers of "hits by hot chicks". Lastly (and in my opinion, most impressively), he is a connoisseur of fine chile peppers and their various preparations and presentations.

We remain (hiding in our closet with the lights off) very truly yours.
 

Kentuckienne

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Roommates include Gus, Blue and gold macaw rescue and Coco, secondhand amazon
Can other parrots become "Honorary Amazons"... ever?
You could make a standardized test! Or an application process? Maybe a Skype interview...

.....

Regarding inclusion of "Honorary Amazons," he stated that he is not involved with that area of activity and that as stated above, it has been provided to the appropriate committee.

...

Best Regards,
Amazon Staff Person, SailBoat

Why does the Committee keep its important paperwork on the bottom of Salty's cage? He does seem to be contributing what he can to the content.
 
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SailBoat

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Veterinarians /Medical Care of Amazons
Signs of Illness in Parrots


Like the Segments prior to this one, done had not been predestined to be part of this Thread and are now included for the same reasons as their ability to meet specific needs seen as part of Threads asking for help. The inclusion in this case was heavily influenced by the number of ‘Off-Hours’ Thread’s requesting evaluation of the condition of their Parrot. Example: Is my Parrot Ill?

In the vast majority of cases, if you are asking, there is a very high likelihood that your Parrot needs to be seen by an Avian Vet and the sooner the better! If you have a Parrot, you should already have seen your Avian Vet when or just after you brought the Parrot home. In addition, you should have phone number(s) and address(s) of 24 hr./day Emergency Services!

It is my sincere hope that it will be of help!
 
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SailBoat

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Continued from the Post Above

Signs of Illness in Parrots
Provided by: Steven (SailBoat), January 2017
The average Parrot owner frequently misses early signs of illness in their Parrots. In the wild, a sick Bird will attempt to maintain a normal appearance as long as possible. The result of this behavior in Companion Parrots is that by the time signs of illness are obvious, the Parrot may have been ill for some time. The Parrot, who dies ‘suddenly’ maybe the result of a failure of the owner to identify subtle changes in the appearance or behavior of the Amazon,. For this reason, owners should familiarize themselves with early signs of illness in their Companion Parrots so that any therapy and care by their Avian Veterinarian will have a more favorable outcome.

Evaluation of Droppings:

Droppings can be an indicator of your Parrot’s health. Paper towels, newspaper or other smooth surfaces can be used to line the cage bottom so that the number, volume, color, and consistency of the droppings can be noted. A Parrot’s normal droppings will vary in appearance depending on its diet.

Normal Droppings:

Feces (Stool) (food waste material from the Digestive Tract) can differ somewhat in color and consistency. Diets with a high seed content usually produce homogeneous dark green feces. Birds on formulated diets normally exhibit soft, brownish feces.

Urine is normally a clear liquid. A diet high in vegetable and fruit matter may increase the Urine Component.

Urates (
Uric Acid) (creamy white waste from the kidney) are often suspended in the liquid urine or appear to wrap around the Feces (Stool).

Abnormal Droppings:
• Decrease in the total number or volume of droppings
• Color change of the Urates /Urine to green or yellow
• Increase in the water content of the Feces (Stool) (Diarrhea)
• Increase in the urine Portion (Polyuria)
• Decrease in the Feces volume with increased Urates (Polyurates)
• Presence of Blood
• Any strong odor in the droppings

Some normal variations may be seen in impending egg-laying females, baby birds on hand feeding formulas, the first void of the morning, conditions of nervousness and stress, or following a large meal of a specific colored food (e.g. blueberries). Thus, the owner should evaluate several droppings under normal circumstances before becoming alarmed.


Other Early Signs of Disease:
The following signs may not require emergency treatment but, because they are abnormal, your Avian Veterinarian should check any Parrot showing these signs.
• Prolonged molt or continual presence of pinfeathers
• Broken, bent, picked or chewed feathers
• Unusual or dull feather color
• Stained feathers over nares or around face or vent
• Crusty material in or around nostrils
• Redness, swelling or loss of feathers around eyes, baldness
• Flakiness on skin or beak
• Sores on bottom of feet
• Lameness or shifting of body weight
• Overgrowth of beak or nails
• Minor changes in talking (vocalizations), biting, or eating habits
• Low reproduction in breeding Parrots

Signs of Serious Illness:
The following signs may indicate a serious health problem and Avian Veterinary assistance should be sought at once!
• Significant changes in number and appearance of the droppings
• Decreased or excessive food or water consumption
• Change in attitude, personality or behavior
• Fluffed posture
• Decreased vocalization
• Change in breathing or abnormal respiratory sounds
• Change in weight or general body condition
• Enlargement or swelling on the body
• Any bleeding or injury
• Vomiting or regurgitation
• Discharge from nostrils, eyes, or mouth.

Emergency First Aid:
Heat (warmth) and food (including water) are the two most important considerations for temporary care of the sick Amazon until your Avian Veterinarian can see it. The Amazon should be kept quiet and handling should be minimized.

Heat: (warmth)

A room temperature of 85-90 degrees F should be maintained for sick Parrots. A temporary incubator can be made by placing a heating pad along the side or floor of the cage and draping the entire cage with towels, a blanket or cage cover. A 60-watt light bulb can be used as an alternate heat source. Ensure that any cage cover does not touch the light /heat source. If the Parrot starts breathing rapidly or holds its wings away from its body, the temperature is too high. Certain types of room heaters, e.g. kerosene, should be avoided.

Food:

Every effort must be made to encourage a sick Parrot to eat. Cups of food should be placed adjacent to where the bird is perched. If the bird is off the perch, food can be scattered on the bottom of the cage or bowls placed there. Offer the Parrot’s favorites, by hand if necessary. As an electrolyte solution, Pedialyte, maybe given orally to your Parrot to help prevent dehydration. If sugar is deemed necessary, a sports drink may be used. These should be warmed before administering, to help avoid hypothermia. Important: The smaller the Bird, the more critical the need for prompt attention.
• Don’t attempt to feed an unconscious Parrot
• Don’t give antibiotics, ‘miracle cures,’ alcohol or oil
• Don’t wait to see how the Parrot is tomorrow
• DO call your Parrot’s Avian Veterinarian



Source: AAV Client Education Program
 
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SailBoat

SailBoat

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"Why does the Committee keep its important paperwork on the bottom of Salty's cage? He does seem to be contributing what he can to the content.[/QUOTE]"


Thank-you, for expressing an interest in the Amazona World of Truly Superior Parrots.

As an Amazon staff person of a 'Senior Member' of the Information Distribution Committee, you should understand the position that your question places the organization.

However, having said that, in speaking with one of our Honored Leaders. He stated that he had 'No Comment' regarding the organization's storage location(s), the practices at those location(s), nor the individual(s) in charge of said location(s).

Thank-You for your Inquiry.

Best Regards,
Amazon Staff Person, SailBoat
 

GaleriaGila

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Oh, wow, Mr. Boat... 85-90...
Do you think that would apply to Patagonians? You know a lot of us lowly non-Amazonians read this thread! :)

P.S.
Just read the above thread... :)
 
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SailBoat

SailBoat

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Oh, wow, Mr. Boat... 85-90...
Do you think that would apply to Patagonians? You know a lot of us lowly non-Amazonians read this thread! :)

P.S.
Just read the above thread... :)



Please know that Patagonian owners can use the vast majority of this Thread for the good Care, loving Understanding and extended Support of the loves of their lives! Use of this Thread is designed to maximize our joy with our Parrot's forever more ....


Happy that you enjoyed that thread as much as I did providing it.

FYI: The temperature range was provided by the AAV and to my understanding applies to all Parrots.
 
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SailBoat

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Veterinarians /Medical Care of Amazons
Who is Responsibility for Your Amazon’s Vet Care!

By: Steven (SailBoat), January 2017


This Post starts the five part series of Segments dedicated to the short and long term Medical Care of your Amazon. It is an out growth of the prior Segment that helped define whether your Parrot is ill and/or needs to be seen by its Avian Vet.

Your Amazon’s Vet has seen hundreds, if not a thousand other Clients, since your last visit, a mere one year ago. Why would you believe that they have any memory of your Parrot’s needs? All they have is what is in their Medical File for your Parrot!

Being proactive assures a higher level of Avian Vet Care during each visit. You have fifteen to thirty minutes — make the very best of every second. Be prepared by reviewing your Amazon’s file (you are keeping your own file at home — right?) before your Well-Bird visit. Have a written list of issues /question regarding specific that have arisen since your last visit.

Developing a Detailed Medical File is your responsibility.

Having and providing a Detailed Historical Document is your responsibility!

Enjoy!


FYI: This large group of Posts, start on page 11 with: Signs of Illness in Parrots!
 
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SailBoat

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Veterinarians /Medical Care of Amazons
Developing a Well-bird Historical Document


This Segment will be devoted to developing one part of an in depth Medical File for your Amazon.

Far too many of us do not understand or see the need for regular Avian Veterinarian visitations. This is likely due to the common miss-belief that Parrots do not suffer regular illness like Humans i.e., the common cold, flu, etc., so that there is no real need for regular Avian Veterinarian visits. Too some degree this can be understood. That based on a Companion Parrot that lives indoors 365 days a year, its owner’s do not visit Pet Stores, etc., very limited exposure to other Parrot owners and you and your family do not garden i.e., they live a fairly sanitary live style. Hence, the Companion Parrot is never exposed to the numerous Avian bacterium, viruses, funguses, etc., that are highly common to very rare. So yes, that can be true, but it is also the foundation of a false reality that we, plus the others that enter our home or we come in contact with are covered in a sanitary enclosure and as a result we bring nothing into our homes. Also, UPS, Federal Express, and the UPS never deliver to our home. The access to our homes is truly unlimited.

This Segment is devoted to the Developing a Well-Bird Historical Document, which involves a major effort on the owner’s part. This provides your Amazon’s Avian Veterinarian with knowledge of your Parrot, a foundation. It also provides you a historical document that you can add to over time. Enjoy!
 
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Continued from the above Post.


Developing a Well-bird Historical Document

By: Steven (SailBoat), January 2017

It is rare that a Parrot owner has a written or better stated, documented history of their Parrot, let alone provided such a document to their Avian Veterinarian. Most owners show-up at a Veterinarian’s office, hopefully an Avian Veterinarian, with a very Sick-Bird and little else. Mid to large Parrots can live a long life. An annual visit to an Avian trained and certified Veterinarian is one way of ensuring that the Parrot will have a healthy life. As part of that yearly visit (more often is recommended), I recommend working with your Avian Veterinarian in developing a detailed Medical File for your Parrot. It will save precious time ‘when’ you’re visit is for a far more serious reason.

Listed below is a guide to the information that will support your Avian Veterinarian’s Medical File. It will provide needed historical information for your Parrot. By providing it in a written, not a verbal form, as part of a new Parrot, Well-Bird examination, will greatly aid in diagnosing ‘when’ you present your Parrot for a Sick-Bird examination. Remember, this information could be essential in aiding a quick diagnosis of your Parrot. Be boldly honest and detailed with your answers, they may save your Parrot’s life.

Origin:

Where did the Parrot come from? Be specific with the Name of the Pet Store, Bird Store, Adoption /Rescue Center, Breeder, or individual (include address and phone number(s) if available). Was the Parrot Wild-Caught, from a U.S. Breeder or not known? Was the Parrot Hand-fed or Parent-raised or shared? How old is the Parrot? Provide a Birth Date, if known. If there is no known record, provide your best estimate (stated as an Estimated Age based on a year). Etc….

Known Medical History:

Include information, which is not in this Veterinarian’s file. Has the Parrot had any previous medical problems, illnesses or prior surgeries? Has the Parrot been tested for TB, Chlamydiosis or other Avian Diseases? Have any blood or diagnostic tests ever been performed? When? Results? DNA or Surgical Sex tested, Etc…. If you have changed Veterinarians, ask the past Veterinarian(s) for a copy of your Parrot’s file. Keep a complete set with your Parrot’s Travel Kit.

Specific Medical Review:

List those items that need to be reviewed as part of each Well-bird /Sick-bird examination, examples being a specific medical problem, illness or prior surgery.

Ownership:

How long has this Parrot been part of your family? Providing an Arrival Date is better then the number of months or years. List prior owners. Be as detail as possible regarding prior ownership (include names, addresses, phone numbers and dates). Is the Parrot a Pet (Companion Parrot) or a Breeder? Are there other Parrots in the household? If so, how many? What kind? Known Medical History of each individual parrot (if not already known by this Avian Veterinarian). What other Pets are in the household? Etc…

Lifestyle:

How much playtime /interaction do you (and others), spend with your Parrot? How much sleep does the Parrot normally get? Is the cage covered at night? Does the Parrot bathe regularly? How often? Is the Parrot confined to a cage, out only when you are home, —or- free to roam (Free Roaming) the house? Does the Parrot receive regular grooming of its beak, wings, and nails? Who performs the grooming and how often? Is the Parrot fully Flighted, a Glider, or Non-Flighted? Egg laying? And if laying, how many, how often and when was the last laying? Etc…

Caging:

Define the type and size of the cage? Type of metal or other materials used in its construction? Is it painted, powder coated, bare metal, and what type metal? What type of cage flooring and covering material(s) used? Cleanliness of cage and how often does it get cleaned? Does the Parrot chew or gnaw on the cage bars? How many perches are in or on the cage? What kind, size and material are they? How many toys are available? What kinds? Where is the cage location in house? Provide the same information on any additional cage(s) (sleeping cage, etc.), play stand(s), tee stand(s) in the house. Does your parrot share its cage with other Parrots? Etc…

Diet:

Type of food offered, and, the type of food actually eaten? Is the food available all day long or part of each day? Appetite? Fickle eater or a food lover? Is water available all day long or part of each day? How regularly is the water changed? What type of water dispenser(s)? Etc…


Your Avian Veterinarian will maintain a weight history (in grams) as part the Medical File. A weekly weight history on a low cost, postage style scale will be happy excepted by your Avian Veterinarian and it is far better then a yearly weight or no history at all. The availability of gram scales, for home use, continues to improve and is common on many Websites. Daily weight history is important with any effort on your part to change your Parrots diet, monitoring a sick Parrot, etc…

It is easy to view this level of detail as over-kill. However, the time spent developing it now will assure it being far more accurate then you’re guessing at details during an ‘emergency’ Sick-bird Veterinarian visit. The combination of an ‘Extensive Medical File’ and the Historical Information (developed here) will provide a solid Medical File for your Parrot.

Anytime, your Avian Veterinarian provides Medication, have them show you with ‘Detail’ how to provide that Medication! Never assume you will figure it out when you get home!!! Always have them show you how!!!

Sources:
The Complete Pet Bird Owner’s Handbook (New Edition), Gary A. Gallerstein D.V.M., www.exoticpetvet.net Avian Section and Vet-to-Vet Section — Avian Topics and www.avianweb.com
Association of Avian Veterinarians, www.aav.org


Amazon’s Have More Fun!


FYI: This large group of Posts, start on page 11 with: Signs of Illness in Parrots!
 
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SailBoat

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Veterinarians /Medical Care of Amazons:
Preparing for Your Amazon’s First Avian Veterinarian Visit


This Segment is in regards to Preparing for Your Amazon’s First Avian Veterinarian Visit, which involves the beginning of developing a strong, well-structured Medial File for your Amazon. This provides your Amazon’s Avian Veterinarian with knowledge of your Parrot, a foundation. It also provides you a medical document that you will be adding to over time. Enjoy!
 
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Continued from the above Post.


Preparing for Your Amazon’s First Avian Veterinarian Visit

By: Steven (SailBoat), January 2017

I have traveled back in time to cut and paste from several of my past articles, and writings gathering points to think about as your Amazon’s first Avian Veterinarian visit approaches.

This first Avian Veterinarian visit, like all first visits are never what you or I would like, but it is part of the stepping stone process, ‘One Step at a Time’ in safely bringing a new Parrot into your home. Prior too, and during this visit is the time to reach back and grab those Parenting Tools and use them! Like a two year-old, toddler - if they catch you worrying, they will get even more stressed and worried!

I believe strongly that a newly arrived Amazon will need a very extensive Medical Examination, including full blood screen testing and a DNA Sex Test as part of that blood test. The Avian Veterinarian will need to also check the Parrot’s stool as part of the testing. Commonly, an Amazon will provide a fresh sample during the Avian Veterinarian visit (mine have always provided such a sample for the Avian Veterinarian). It will be very important to know if your Parrot is a Boy or a Girl. The Diet for a Girl is a little bit different from a Boy and knowing, which you have will allow you to target that difference. In addition, Boys ‘tend’ to have a (sometimes much) more behavior issues during Hormonal Season. Also, remember to get your Parrot’s weight checked, since all future weights will be compared back to this one.

Please take the time to complete the Well-Bird Medical History prior to your scheduled Avian Veterinarian visit. When I first started using this document, my Avian Veterinarian was shocked to get so much information and at first stated that it was not needed, and then fell in love with it and asked for a copy of the original (published as part of this Thread (I Love Amazons), 2016 /2017). She stated that it allowed her to concentrate on specific issues more quickly and was able to spend more time with our Amazon.

I like everything about an Avian Veterinarian who completes a full examination as part of the first, ‘new’ Parrot visit. I have my Avian Veterinarian cut nails quarterly; you may want to consider doing the same. It kept my past Special Needs Amazon (Cleo) and our healthier Amazon (Julio) in front of their Veterinarian on a very regular basis, plus it develops travel skills, social skills, etc… I also use each visit as a knowledge developer for me. I always arrive with my list of questions.

Trimming Wing Feathers:
There is huge debate in the Parrot World regarding keeping a Parrot flightless, as a glider, or a flyer. When there is a subject that is being debated at the upper most levels of the Parrot World, I will always present it that way. In addition, I will tell you my position and provide why I made my choice. If you elect to take a different position, know that I will support your choice.

My position is that unless there is a strong medical reason too the contrary, Special Needs Parrots, Middle Age and Older non-Flyers should not have their wing feathers trimmed. ‘My belief’ is that, this group needs their wing feathers to help prevent them from falling like a stone during a miss-step or fall. Others would say that by trimming their wing feathers, it prevents them from flying into a wall, mirror or window -or- worst, out the door. With this new arrival, my recommendation would be to leave the wing feathers and when you have additional time with your Parrot, plus additional information, make the determination at that time. Understand that your Avian Veterinarian will more then likely be on the other side of this debate. So, it is an issue you should think about prior to the Avian Veterinarian visit. Having said that, I am seeing a rapid change in the Avian Veterinarian field as ever-younger Parrots are presenting with Heart Problems! This reality has ever increasing numbers of Avian Veterinarians rethinking their positions on keeping Parrots Flighted.

NOTE: There has been for years, any number true life accounts of Parrots having their wings feathers trimmed by individuals will no professional training as to correct method and equipment needed to properly trim wing feathers. Never let anyone cut your Parrot’s wings that have not been trained by a Professional Avian Expert! Serous to deadly errors can be made by the untrained!


Nail Trim!
I'm very good at trimming nails. But I never trim my own Amazon's nails. I want to be the one that saves my beloved Amazon from the Avian Veterinarian or their trained Avian Tech. Remember, does this action increase your Parrot’s Trust Bond or hurt it. For most owners it is better to let the Avian Veterinarian handle the trimming the first time around. We can talk about the pros and cons later and the proper tools!

Beak Trim!
If anyone is going to trim a beak it should only be an Avian Veterinarian with the certified knowledge and experience to do it correctly. The Beak is highly sensitive and although strong, it is also very fragile. Your Avian Veterinarian will know if a trim is needed. All good Avian Veterinarians do not trim beaks unless there is a real need for this action! The blood test will tell the Avian Veterinarian a great deal regarding your Amazon's overall health. And, this is true of the Beak's health. In addition, some Avian Veterinarians are beginning to recommend ‘minor’ beak rounding for Parrots that Pluck.

A good Avian Veterinarian and/or their Avian Trained Tech's will handle your Parrot in a manner in which s/he will be controlled (will not thrush about). A few Amazons will scream during the entire event! The majority of Amazons will tuff-it-out until they are returned back - rushing to their owner for comfort and protection! This event maybe be of little or highly stressful for your Parrot and being there to save him is nothing but positive. It is not uncommon for a Parrot to be tired for the next couple of days and it will be best to keep your home quiet and provide lots of comfortable talk.
 
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SailBoat

SailBoat

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Jul 10, 2015
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Continued from the above Post.



NEVER let anyone towel your parrot unless you know that they are an Avian Veterinarian, or an Vet Tech with Avian training. Yes, Parrots have one very sharp Beak and very capable of using it. But other then the structure of the Beak the rest of a parrot is designed very lightly - so they can fly. It is very possible to crush bone structure, apply a little too much force and break a wing, a neck, foot or the rib cage. The process of toweling is an Art that I know most owners can learn, but there are far too many easy ways of moving your Parrot into and out of a carrier, etc., that the need to teach toweling to a first time owner is not an immediate priority. That said, as a part of this first Avian Veterinarian visit, have your Vet teach you the proper method of toweling your Amazon, even if you have been doing it for years!

*Please remember to have the Avian Veterinarian check the condition of your Amazon's feet!


WARNING: There is always the possibility that the examination and/or testing may present health problems. Parrots that have not had regular Avian Veterinarian visits are total unknown with regards to their health. Remember that Parrots are excellent at hiding illness. If your Amazon presents with a health problem beyond what is known, please do not give-up on him. Loving care for Humans and loving care for Parrots provide beyond what Medical Science can even hope too!

NOTE: If health problems present, take detailed notes and ask the Avian Veterinarian to write it down for you. Like with Human Medical Vocabulary - the words get real big, real fast! And, most of us are paying more attention to our Amazons to remember anything in detail!


Regarding the Avian Veterinarian visit. Call before leaving to adjust your arrival time - if the Avian Veterinarian is running early or late. Ask what time you should arrive with your ‘PARROT.’ By reminding the office staff that you have a Parrot will result in them providing an adjusted arrival time. Carry a bottle of water with you and at the Avian Veterinarian's office; ensure that the carrier's bowl has water in it, if needed! As you prepare to leave, dump the water. If the Avian Veterinarian is ready for you and it’s a visit that moves along quickly there maybe no need to supply water. It’s a judgment call, however error on the safe-side by having water! Ensure that you always travel with a bowl for water and a water bottle. Dry food is also important on longer trips.

Anytime, your Avian Veterinarian provides Medication, have them show you with ‘Detail’ how to provide that Medication! Never assume you will figure it out when you get home!!! Always have them show you how!!!


Amazons’ Have More Fun!


FYI: This large group of Posts, start on page 11 with: Signs of Illness in Parrots!
 
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