Plucking: A Search For Answers

Anansi

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I'll say! Niko's plumage looks soft as a plush toy!

Excellent examples given, Wendy!

Jiannotto, an individual chewed or overpreened feather is generally no cause for concern. Once in a while a particular feather might irritate your bird for whatever reason, and he may respond to it accordingly. It's when you see a collection of said feathers that you would actually need to worry.
 
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Allee

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I took some photos of fallen out (molted) feathers this morning from Ripley, Niko, and Sam.







Niko obviously overpreened one of them before it came out. :54:





But no worries, I won't be rushing him to the vet any time soon, because this guy rarely has a single feather out of place. :D


Ripley, Niko, & Sam, thanks for donating your healthy molted feathers, very nice example.

Wendy, thanks for the bonus photo of gorgeous Niko!
 

CaliBirdGirl

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Hi I am trying these things for my Severe Macaw. You can make one of these from a sock [ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuXJUiHxb_M"]How to make a Sock with holes for Parrots (Prevent Plucking) - YouTube[/ame]
 
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godsdrummer209

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[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh3e4WHnnv0"]IMG 0175 - YouTube[/ame]

Is this considered plucking im scared for my grey ;(
 

JerseyWendy

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How did the shaft look of the feather he removed? He could be molting. And even if he isn't, birds DO preen out lose feathers on a regular basis.
 

godsdrummer209

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i will take a pic of the feather but it doesnt look as if its damaged :( its breaking my heart and have a vet appointment but toward the end it looks intentional and im just not being able to accept that my baby is plucking
 

JerseyWendy

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i will take a pic of the feather but it doesnt look as if its damaged :( its breaking my heart and have a vet appointment but toward the end it looks intentional and im just not being able to accept that my baby is plucking

Please - take a deep breath and relax. Your grey looks to be in PERFECT feathers! As I've said before, birds DO remove lose/old feathers. That doesn't mean he's plucking. :)
 

godsdrummer209

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thanks wendy it just worried me because i saw so many feathers he is only 15 months old and when i saw it i panicked... my friends started plucking at a very young agae when his mom went out of the country for a month.... and i blew on his chest and when i saw him rip one out it worried me sick and then he pulled another one on my shoulder yesterday and it felt like the whole world tumbled down. i love him to death and will love him regard less just dont want to see him hurt himself you know... but thanks for the input definitly comforting thank u... im still taking himt o the vet on thursday
 

Birdman666

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If he were plucking/over preening, you'd begin to see bald spots where there was just down, and you'd see feathers that looked chewed.

Looking at your bird's pic what you see is a bird that doesn't have a feather out of place...

And that's the key right there.

If it's not broken, don't try and fix it.

And mine often chew up molted feathers, so you can't even go by that. Maggie will collect her old feathers from the floor, use them as foot toys, and chew them up.

If you start seeing bare patches where there were none, THAT'S when you begin to take notice...

And the first steps are usually a blood test to rule out any physiological cause... increased bathing. Increased out time, attention, and activities - especially foraging activities, and preening toys.

And with Eckies, you also check the diet, and reduce possible trigger foods. (Same as toe tap.)
 
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godsdrummer209

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ok thank you i left the house at noon and came back 2pm and didnt see any feathers in the cage but thank you so so so much for your help
 
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Allee

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I agree with Wendy and Mark. Your bird appears to be in fine feather. Looks like perfectly normal preening to me.
 

godsdrummer209

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hi wendy i still seem to see 4-6 feathers around the cage unchewed ... havent seen him pluck just preen but its starting to have bald spots
IMG_0189.jpg
IMG_0190.jpg
 

JerseyWendy

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Preening is perfectly normal. And molting parrots will preen more than those who are not molting. :) And it's normal to see feathers come out while they preen. Still nothing to worry about. A bird going through a molt may sometimes appear to have rough patches.

I'd give him 2-3 good baths a week. That will soften up the new feather shafts and help him get through this molt a bit quicker and easier.
 

Birdman666

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Presently have six Greenwing Macaw (17 yo), Red Fronted Macaw (12 yo), Red Lored Amazon (17 y.o.), Lilac Crowned Amazon (about 43 y.o.) and a Congo African Grey (11 y.o.)
Panama Amazon (1 Y.O.)
This is an interesting bit of research:

"Vitamin B6 is used by the body to manufacture brain chemicals (neurotransmitters), such as serotonin, melatonin and dopamine. Preliminary research shows vitamin B6 helps the body cope with anxiety and panic. Perhaps a couple chunks of watermelon a day will help to manage feather-picking behavior in parrots?"

I don't know how accurate that is, but I do know my fids love watermelon...

CAN'T HURT!
 

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