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Old 12-27-2016, 10:27 AM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

[quote=Kentuckienne;626234]
Quote: Originally Posted by Panama View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by SailBoat View Post

I cannot find the beak book for less than around 100 dollars on Amazon...some are over 300 dollars!! Does that sound right?
Sally's website says she found a box of unsold copies of the Beak Book, and is selling them for $58. Before I learned that I had already found a copy on eBay. I got four parrot books in a lot for small change. Including the Companion Parrot book which is EXCELLENT.

One of the four is a book about conures, which I don't need and will make available to someone else who can use it. It's pretty basic.
Ok! I am on the correct website! I was not sure if this was the right website or not, but I found the same one that said she found some in her garage. I have sent an email inquiring about them! Thank you!
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  #92 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2016, 10:33 AM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

Quote: Originally Posted by Panama View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by SailBoat View Post

Perches
There should be at least three (3) different diameter perches in the cage, sized for the comfort of your Parrot, commonly larger than those supplied with cage. The perches should also differ in textures with at least one of the perches being a rope or Booda perch. The rope perch should be the one that is placed at the highest point for sleeping. Place this perch in a U shape in an upper back corner of the cage. This is especially important if you have a feather picker. It gives a sense of safety to the Parrot, plus if they turn to pick, the rope is right there and they will commonly opt to shred it. Do not use stone or concrete perches unless they are at the lowest level of the cage and there are at least two or three wood /rope perches available at higher levels in the cage. Wider natural tree branches are always healthier for your Parrot’s claw pads then machined dowels.

After placing the rope sleeping perch, the other perches should be wood, or a minimum of two woods and one of a different texture of choice (see above). There does not have to be perches in front of every food dish. Humans tend to make life just a little too easy for these busy birds. Unless your Parrot has a physical disability or is limited due to age make them work a little.

Thank you for all these posts! It is all amazing information for those of us who are somewhat new to the Amazon Parenting Life.... I have not had any experience with the rope perches... any suggestions on where or more specifically what to buy? I have looked on Amazon, and there are lots of choices. Is there one that is more safe than the other? I am just worried about Panama chewing through it.
At the bottom of that Segment, you will see that I have backed away from rope perches for the roosting perch for the reason that you noted. Some Amazons will chew them. As a general statement, I do not have a problem with Amazons chew the rope perches. Its more an issues of owners not watching and trimming the threads as they appear. The concern is less that the Amazon will chew through it, but more that the Threads 'may' become stuck in their Crop. Proper trimming will prevent this!!!

The goal of this Thread is to simply pass along the knowledge based, so that individuals like yourself will use it and then provide that knowledge forward. Knowledge not shared is lost forever! It is heartwarming to know that you are enjoying it!

Buying Rope Perches has always been something that I like to do when I can place my hands on the rope and as important the connector at the ends. I like a tight rope with a very solid end connector. Once you have found the type you feel most comfortable with, note the Manufacturers' name and target purchasing that brand /manufacturer on the Web.

Whenever you can, target high quality Pet Stores with a Web Presents. Look for an educational section to their website, the fact that they have one is a good clue you found a good one!!! I like Parrot Island because I know the owners for 'a very long time' and have seen the quality of their offering and knowledge that they share!
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  #93 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2016, 10:40 AM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

Preventing Larva In Parrot Food

There are few things that are more frustrating than to purchase what one believes to be a quality dry base Parrot food only to find it is filled with larva webs and larva crawling around inside the bag! Which is commonly followed by a call to the Manufacturer and getting a quick lesson in reading Date Codes and/or knowing the differences between original packaging and some ones repackaging. Yes, you can always feed it to the Wild Birds, but that wasn’t why you purchased that Parrot food to begin with, correct?

As part of this Segment, we look at different methods of manufacturer packaging, storage at our homes and hopefully no longer having to deal with those ‘bugs.’ As with another Segment, I will reframe from using enjoy and just say: Ponder!



Continued from the Post above!


Preventing Larva In Parrot Food

By: Steven Frasier, December 2016

The majority of Name Brand manufacturers’ package their products in a sealed container; lined paper, plastic bags, and plastic jars. Commonly, the packaging is vacuum packed or nitrogen-purged. Nitrogen-purged (like what they do with potato chips) packaging is the best choice since pure nitrogen is food safe, but displays oxygen – this eliminates (kills) all known larva, etc. Until opened, Nitrogen-purged manufactures’ original package is the best way to buy and store the product until needed.

Once opened, the glass jar is a great storage vessel. For washing, very hot water is the key - commonly dishwashers are better than hand washing - higher temperature being the key. Prior to starting a dishwasher, run the hot water in the supporting sink until it is hot, at that point, turn on the dishwasher. Ensure that your hot water heater is set at a safe level. There are all kinds of energy saving discussions regarding lowering the hot water temperature, however ‘warm water’ is an invitation to bacteria. If there are no small children in the house, the setting should be to a level that is uncomfortable to hold your hand under. Most hot water heaters will have a recommended operating zone, stay just to high side of the center of that zone.

Once cleaned, Glass Jars will protect their contents far better than any other storage vessel. The weak point of a Glass Jar is the lid. Far too often, the lid is either not washed or gets a quick splash, they require the same high temperature as the glass jar itself. Unless the lid had larva under the seal, it’s hard to believe that either the glass jar or its lid would be the source of larva. Note: The most common source of bacteria in a glass jar is the lid seal!

It is very possible that the source of a larva infestation is the food or pellets themselves or their original container. When buying anything today – search out the ‘sell by’ date code and stay away from product that have past its date code.

If you encounter an infestation, contact the manufacturer and inform them of what you found. If you still have the original packaging, it will have a manufacturers’ product /production /batch code number on it that will define its batch, its production date and manufacturing location, the manufacturer needs this information to determine if there was a problem during processing. If the product is beyond its sell by code, well they will still be interested, but do not except a replacement.

We have experienced like occurrences in the past (larva webbing in Parrot food), but once we had switched to using only nitrogen-purged products, we have not had problems. The other thing to keep in mind is to select only ‘Human Grade food sources’ for your Parrot.

“Always make sure that no webbing is in the bag /packaging when you are purchasing your food. The good folks at Parrot Island recommend that their customers keep their foods refrigerated (keep it frozen) to keep it fresh.”

“Anything that is fresh and doesn't contain rubber tires as a preservative has the possibility of 'hatching'. I used to believe that 48 hours was long enough to freeze foods to kill any possible eggs, but have since discovered that a week or longer is much better. At present, we freeze for a minimum of 30 days! Also, when removing from the manufacturers’ packaging, place it in containers that will last you about one week. Place everything else in sealed containers and back in the Freezer.”

At Feathered Follies, they recommend using Tupperware, or something similar that seals well, with about a single week’s supply of food near the cage and store the remainder of their supply in the freezer. Not only will this prevent bugs, but also it will prolong the life of the food should it past the expiration date. Also, be sure to clean the container that is kept out often.

Some foods such as Goldenfeast, recommend keeping their containers in the refrigerator after opening.

It seems that there are many variables that will affect the storage of animal and human food: humidity, method of storage, when packaged, purged or not-purged with nitrogen, type of preservatives, expiration dates, and attempting to store foods for too long before use, etc.

Buy fresh (date code), target nitrogen-purged products, buy only product that is in the manufacturers’ original packaging. Freeze until ready to break into small (one weeks use) packaging, Freeze what will not be used that week. Date code anything you repackage!

Follow the simply tools provided above and the likelihood of having to deal with larva and/or larva webs will be greatly reduced.

Sources: Shari Beaudoin, Parrot Island and Laurie Baker, Feathered Follies
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Laurasea (11-14-2018)
  #94 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2016, 10:48 AM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

[quote=SailBoat;626237][quote=Panama;626229]
Quote: Originally Posted by SailBoat View Post


At the bottom of that Segment, you will see that I have backed away from rope perches for the roosting perch for the reason that you noted. Some Amazons will chew them. As a general statement, I do not have a problem with Amazons chew the rope perches. Its more an issues of owners not watching and trimming the threads as they appear. The concern is less that the Amazon will chew through it, but more that the Threads 'may' become stuck in their Crop. Proper trimming will prevent this!!!

The goal of this Thread is to simply pass along the knowledge based, so that individuals like yourself will use it and then provide that knowledge forward. Knowledge not shared is lost forever! It is heartwarming to know that you are enjoying it!

Buying Rope Perches has always been something that I like to do when I can place my hands on the rope and as important the connector at the ends. I like a tight rope with a very solid end connector. Once you have found the type you feel most comfortable with, note the Manufacturers' name and target purchasing that brand /manufacturer on the Web.

Whenever you can, target high quality Pet Stores with a Web Presents. Look for an educational section to their website, the fact that they have one is a good clue you found a good one!!! I like Parrot Island because I know the owners for 'a very long time' and have seen the quality of their offering and knowledge that they share!
Thank you again! I missed your other part where you backed away from them. I will go back and re-read. Still getting used to this forum and the flow of how things are in regards to responses, and where everything goes. My biggest issue is I have no decent pet stores anywhere near me. At least none that I have found. We have your basic petsmart, petco, etc. But nothing catered towards birds specifically, so the majority of my purchases have to come from online. I will take a look at the Parrot Island and see what I can find about them! Thank you again. This forum has been of great help to my husband and me the past week or so since we found it!
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  #95 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2016, 03:58 PM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

Stop Buying Very Young Amazons

The practice of selling un-weaned baby Parrots has been around for as long as there has been Humans looking for a Parrot on the cheap and Breeders looking to maximize their profits. As a selling tool, the ‘story’ that buying a very young Parrot will assure that the Parrot will imprint on the buyer and result in a better /friendlier Parrot is false! So, stop buying very young Amazons!

This Segment begins when this approach to buying an Amazon turns into a disaster. With luck, the owners happen upon the Amazon Society Online Help Group (currently closed) and what could have become a nightmare is turn around! Enjoy!
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  #96 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2016, 03:59 PM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

Continued from the above Post

Stop Buying Very Young Amazons

By: Steven (SailBoat), Dec 2016

One of the saddest parts of working with people who purchase Parrots without any research is working with that specific group that purchases very young Amazons under the misguided belief that the baby will ‘imprint’ on them and all will be wonderful forever after. Every year far too many people are buying very young Parrots and a very few of them come here for help, even fewer come back with a happy ending. That is the reality of buy baby Amazon, which are barely, if at all, weaned and still on a very demanding formula schedules. The sad understanding is that these babies are being placed in the hands of the uninformed. This can only be described as: A Disaster that has ‘Found a Place to Happen.’

This Segment is a continuation of like Segments, which had been based on one-on-one discussions as part of the Amazons Society, North America Group with Amazon owners. This particular Segment came about after several Threads by the baby Amazon’s owner regarding their belief that the problem was a ‘serious hormonal behavior.’ Several knowledgeable Amazon owners had responded regarding the then three, month old Amazon with little or no success.

Getting involved:

Prior to responding to your most recent Thread, I took the time to visit the Member’s Chat sessions and reviewed, in detail, your Threads and Postings, and the proper and measured responses to your Threads and Postings by other owners. To that end, I believe, you would be well served to again review those same Thread and Posts.

With in your Threads and Posts, I found that you had taken the time and advice to obtain Sally Blandard’s Companion Parrot Handbook. Assuming that to be true, I would recommend that you take the time to read carefully the following sections.
Chapter One: Nurturing Guidance Basics
Chapter Four: Preparing for Your Bappy (baby parrot)
Chapter Five: What To Expect: An Overview
Chapter Six: Skills to Teach Your Bappy (baby parrot)
Chapter Eight: Behavioral Tools & Concepts
Chapter Nine: Preventing & Solving Behavior Problems

Yes, its one big load of reading. However, setting your Amazon along side you and reading the chapters aloud to him will entertain your Amazon and the process of reading aloud will more quickly set the practices presented in place. Just because you read it once, does not mean that you have completed this part of the process, after all, its call a Handbook, which means you will refer to it often over the long life of your Amazon. I have lived with Amazons for over thirty years (a few more since than) and I continue to read and re-read my source materials. Like my Machinery’s Handbook, they are constantly referenced.

At this point, you’re more then likely not happy that I have not simply provided you with several quick sentences containing insightful tools and the precise locations of the proper buttons to push that will make everything better. To that end, I can only say that I am sorry! Sorry that your Breeder sold you an Amazon that was far too young for your skills. Sorry that your Breeder sold you an Amazon and did not provide you with the basic skill sets and knowledge sources for the critical information that you need to teach your very young Amazon. Sorry that you now find yourself with a young Amazon who is allowed to run his’ own life and not surprisingly, doing a very poor job of it. However, at no time is it the Amazon’s fault for being allowed to run his’ own life. That would be like allowing a very young Human child to run his life and not surprisingly, finding him also doing a very poor job of it.

Is this your fault, well Yes and No! But, you have made any number of miss-steps in your actions and interactions with your Amazon! Whose fault is that? Is it the Breeder’s fault for selling you a Parrot that has not been fully weaned, let alone not fledged, yes! But, at the same time, we have always lived in a World in which adults should be teaching their children the meaning of: Let The Buyer Beware! Sadly, there are far too many bad people in this World and we must constantly beware of that fact!

The proper feeding, emotional caring, nurturing, behavioral transitioning and socializing of very young Parrots is a ‘specialty’ best handled by ‘caring Breeders’ who are seriously concerned about the process of ‘placing’ and not simply ‘selling’ their babies. Breeders who dump their overly young parrots on a new comer to the Parrot World are clearly only interested in selling. Sadly, there is not a large number of people who have the background, training and available time to jump in here and address your very specific questions regarding a very young Parrot.

The issues you are confronted would have developed over the past many weeks and with time and effort they can be correct. However, it will take time to un-learn and set proper behaviors in place. I work with senior Amazons and I cherish ‘very small’ gains, over months and years as great successes. You need to understand the reality that everything your Amazon is doing, you have taught or allowed and they are all reversible. Your needs require a one-on-one with, a baby Parrot specialists and to that end, I would recommend you contact one of the individuals listed below: (List removed by Author).


Post Script:

The good news is that they did contact a Breeder that was able to take the Amazon and retrain him! The sad reality is that the push to sell ever-younger Parrots to off set a softening market and/or enhance their profits only increases the number of ever-younger Parrots being rescued or abandoned. In this case, the Amazon was not being fed properly and it’s believed hormonal behavioral problem was directly related to it becoming more aggressive in a vein effort to simply obtain food! Luckily, this Amazon was rescued and has found its way to an individual practiced in raising young Parrots, and once fully-fledged, has found a new and happy home. Sadly, this type of ending is far too rare.

In preparation of providing this Segment, I had contacted the current owner’s of the Amazon and he is a happy, full of loving Amazon, growing and blossoming in his forever home!

Please Stop Buying baby Parrot that are not fully weaned and clearly on solid food, all day /all night!!!
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  #97 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:41 PM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

Highly Contagious Avian Diseases

There is no question that South, Central and North America had been very fortunate during 2016 with only a couple of very small out-breaks of Avian Influenza. The reported occurrences in California (USA) and Ontario (Canada) had been quickly contained without additional reports in their separate Migration Fly Ways. That was not the case in North Europe as their Fall Migration began. Not surprisingly, the DNA structure of the Avian Influenza was not changed over the past three (3) years as it has remained stable and within Avian Species.

This next Segment provides a very casual over view of the Highly Contagious, Avian Diseases that present on a Worldwide scale. It does not go into the far more common backyard players, which seem to set just outside our homes, waiting in the hedge to take advantage of a weaken Avian member of our home. The point, there are bad players in the Avian Disease World, some are International Players, other are far more than common, near neighbors that need to be avoided. Following sensible and common health practices for both your Parrot and your safety will help avoid them. Ponder!



Continuation from the above Post!


Highly Contagious Avian Diseases
By: Steven (SailBoat), January 2017

I do not want to understate the daily dangers that our feathered family members face with the existing diseases with in the North America and more specifically our Avian Community Worldwide. Nor do I wish to upset or cause undue worry among our membership by presenting a worst-case scenario regarding the highly pathogenic H5 class of Avian Influenza; we are seeing periodic reports of throughout the World. In addition to those latest World News reports, with in our existing mix of diseases, we must remember that we are still being effected by WestNile virus and for reasons unknown to the experts, we have seen very mild seasons compared to the prior years. Having stated all of that, I do believe that it is very important that as members of the Avian Community, we understand that we are faced with very dangerous new comers to an already deadly mix of existing avian diseases.

Prior to the news releases of last year regarding the highly pathogenic H5 class of Avian Influenza mild Spring occurrence in Western North American, early Fall occurrence in Eastern North America, and the Fall ‘outbreak’ in Europe, please remember that there is also Exotic Newcastle Disease still out there and like this latest version of an Avian Flu, Newcastle has made it, although briefly, to the North American Eastern Shoreline. With the South -to- North (Spring) migration starting in a few months throughout the World’s Southern Hemisphere, in addition to the ongoing consignment shipping of 'birds' (and people) throughout the world daily, the likelihood of one or all three of this diseases presenting in North America with in the next five months is likely.

The precaution for the protection our feathered family members against the spread of highly infectious Avian Diseases are well documented and poorly adhered to by our Community as a whole. Assuming the likelihood of one or all of these diseases presenting (an outbreak of size) in the North America, we will be faced with major changes to our current lack of adherence to disease control with in our Avian Companion Community. If you need a reality check, ask one of our European members what the Fall of 2016 was like for them.

As with any disease that 'may' present on a Worldwide scale, there is an equal likelihood that it, for unknown reasons, may not present anymore that sporadically. This places organizations like ours in a difficult position. Do we publicly and strongly advocate rigid adherence to the well documented methods of preventing the spread of highly contagious Avian Diseases and risk the backlash if the worst does not happen or become media targets if it does?

I believe that it will be in our best interests to have a prepared media 'Position Statement', in which the organization strongly advocates and enforces adherence to the USDA's Bio-Security for Birds documented methods of prevention of the spread of highly contagious Avian Diseases.


Amazon's Have More Fun!

Last edited by SailBoat; 01-03-2017 at 02:44 PM.
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Old 01-03-2017, 03:39 PM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

The Sounds of Flight

There is nothing like enjoying the sounds of my Amazons over the years as they regained the use of their Wings, from joyful sounds to amazement in what they are doing, all the way to the Mechanics of flight.

So, with in this short Segment, we are going to identify specific sounds and understand, just a bit better, this mystical, magical thing call flight. Enjoy!



Continuation of the above Post!


The Sounds of Flight
By: Steven (SailBoat), January 2017

I have been following, with much interest, discussion within different Parrot Groups regarding the sounds that our Parrots and more specifically Amazons make during flight. There are clearly two very different sounds; one is their vocalizations and the other results from the mechanics of flight. With Amazons and other heavy bodied Parrots, the mechanics of flight is more dynamic hence the mechanical sound of flight will be more distinctive.

Vocalizations:
For any number of reasons, Birds vocalize during flight. There are Contact Calls, Formation Calls, Direction Calls, Predator Alert Calls, etc., etc.... In addition, I believe, that there are sets of calls, which say something like; Look at Me, this is Great, Weeee! This class of calls is purely subjective on my part and result from my personal observation of the flights of our wild caught Lilac Crown Amazon and her early flights and later her mature flights after regaining her flight feathers. We are enjoying, with great interests and joy, our Double Yellow Headed Amazon’s calls from his early flights. As of this writing, his calls have been the exhilaration of ‘WOW’ I did that, combined with his high standing and pinning eye excitement. And last, but not least, for the leader of any flock, there will always be those ‘objection calls’ from the following flock, i.e. Hey Why Are We Going This Way, etc…

Sounds created from the Mechanics of Flight:
Resulting from the specific movement /positioning of feathers needed to ‘create’ flight results in very specific sounds. The primary sound occurs above and just behind the leading edge of the Wing. This sound is the result of air rushing in and across the top of the Wing to fill the void (low pressure zone) left by the Wing displacing and compressing the air down, under, and back from the under Wing area (high pressure zone). The added sound, heard more commonly by Companion Parrot owners, in the quiet of their home, is the rustle of the feathers as their positions change in relationship to each other during each stroke. The amount of sound created during any down stroke is directly proportionate to how deep the cutting action. Example: More sound during take-off or aggressive maneuvers and less or no discernable sound during level flight or gliding.

Wing positioning and design allows some Birds to fly with little or no discernable sound, example: Owls.

As amazing as the most leading edge designed aircrafts have become, they are little more then propelled gliders.

Stop and Watch Flight:
Should you ever find yourself in a position to watch your Parrot fly - Do So, For As Long As Possible! There is true Wonderment in what is occurring before your very eyes!

Amazon’s Have More Fun!
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  #99 (permalink)  
Old 01-09-2017, 09:26 AM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

Quote: Originally Posted by Kentuckienne View Post
I found the good camera and got a better photo of the feet on the perch. He was afraid of it at first, but now he prefers it.
Our Amazon is deathly afraid of any new perch we get him. It is like we just introduced the plague into his home, he gets super offended, stares, and growls at me for about two days. Then out of nowhere, it is like that perch has been there is whole life and he won't leave it for like two days. He is such a character!!
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Old 01-09-2017, 08:35 PM
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Re: I Love Amazons - An On-Going Journey!

wa... so lovely,I hope mine will become a good girl like yours.
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