Parrot Forum Header Left  
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > ParrotForums.com > New Members Welcome

New Members Welcome Post here to introduce yourself! Tell us a bit about your bird(s), hobbies, setup, etc! Parrot Owners Introduction

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 07:58 AM
Owlet's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Lincoln (Eclectus), Apollo (Cockatiel)
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Colorado
Thanks: 563
Thanked 2,669 Times in 1,014 Posts
Owlet is on a distinguished road
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

Sponsored Links
So they have a swing and one perch? that's all they have in terms of perches?? If so i would also add a few (non wooden dowel!) perches to that class collection Wrench suggested
__________________
Looking for art of your avian friend? Click here!
Lincoln adopt date: 11/21/2016
Apollo hatch date: 10/13/2018
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Owlet For This Useful Post:
Scott  (08-16-2018)
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 08:02 AM
Kiwibird's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
1 BFA- Kiwi. Hatch circa 98', forever home with us Dec. 08'
Join Date: Jul 2012
Thanks: 8,407
Thanked 16,061 Times in 6,291 Posts
Kiwibird will become famous soon enough
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

SO many things wrong with this picture. Poor birds This is a perfect example though of why you don't want to take your bird to a regular vet and it is 100% worth forking over the extra money to see an avian specialist. If this is where students wanting to be vets start learning about caring for birds, it's no wonder they can't treat them properly (have seen some real head scratchers the past few weeks on here of regular vets doing bizarre and dangerous things to birds)!

First off, it seems your 'teacher' lacks a fundamental understanding of avian psychology and behavior. Breeder birds are rarely 'pet quality' and are typically disinterested in human interaction beyond what is absolutely essential. These birds being aggressive towards people is likely more due to a general lack of training and them being bonded to each other, hence being disinterested in human interaction. Most breeder birds, at best, tolerate humans. Many do become used to their eggs or chicks being removed for hand feeding. In fact some better breeders even 'co-raise' the chicks with the parent birds. But I get the distinct impression it is not anyones intention for these birds to breed or keep laying eggs, which means there is someone out there who isn't bright enough to not keep a male and female together because they're going to do what males and females of all species who reproduce sexually do... And this individual is teaching veterinary students! I bet they have some kind of nest box in their cage too. It is also likely, as breeder birds sometimes do, one is plucking the others head.

These birds at minimum need to be separated into side by side cages and worked with individually if the desired result is 'tame' birds and so that the female stops plucking the males head. Interactions should be supervised and mating not allowed. The female should not have anything in her cage that is 'nest like', as that will just encourage her to keep laying eggs. Toys should be provided for mental stimulation as well as perches of varying diameters, texture and material so the feet get exercise and don't develop arthritis. Better yet, what REALLY should happen is these birds get rehomed to someone who actually knows how to and is willing to take care of them properly (which is scary to say, as a vet program should be capable of properly caring for a couple cockatiels). The female also needs to be seen by an actual avian vet if she has laid numerous clutches of eggs. Female parrots can develop life threatening health issues from chronic egg laying as well as life shortening calcium deficiencies. Smaller parrots are even more prone to these issues.
__________________

Last edited by Kiwibird; 08-16-2018 at 08:33 AM.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Kiwibird For This Useful Post:
Scott  (08-16-2018), socktheconure (08-16-2018)
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 10:49 AM
socktheconure's Avatar
Junior Member
Parrots:
Sock (conure) Yondu (blue budgie) Quill (yellow/blue budgie)
Join Date: Aug 2018
Thanks: 5
Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
socktheconure is on a distinguished road
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

Agreed. I've known that paint can be a serious issue with cages.

My family and I attempted to get a cage for the cockatiels, but it ended up being smaller than expected. I'm unsure if we can afford to attempt to get them a new one, but we will try our best as our Vet teacher wants 'donations'.

I can definitely try and get them toys soon though! They just do not have as much space for toys, considering that the cage is only about 2 feet long and it would become cluttered.

I also forgot to mention the disco ball toy on the swing- they seem to like that one a bit.
But, like I said, that's it. Their cage is very boring. I'll try and get photos soon.
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 11:02 AM
socktheconure's Avatar
Junior Member
Parrots:
Sock (conure) Yondu (blue budgie) Quill (yellow/blue budgie)
Join Date: Aug 2018
Thanks: 5
Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
socktheconure is on a distinguished road
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

Sure thing!! I'll try and get some.

Someone suggested a new cage- I think I'm going to try and get that as well.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 11:06 AM
socktheconure's Avatar
Junior Member
Parrots:
Sock (conure) Yondu (blue budgie) Quill (yellow/blue budgie)
Join Date: Aug 2018
Thanks: 5
Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
socktheconure is on a distinguished road
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

Agreed!
Somewhat off topic, but the Vet lab used to have ferrets- two of them. The reason we no longer have them is because the students neglected them "because they stink".

They don't have a nest box! It's just the male and female. The female lays the eggs and they fall to the bottom of the cage. It's awful.
I'll see what I can do. I considered getting the school entirely new cockatiels, but I'm unsure what would happen to the other two!

The best I can do right now is give them fake eggs and hope for the best. I suggested a gofundme to try and achieve this, because at the moment I can not afford to get them two separate cages (the vet teacher won't get them on her own).
For context, I am a minor who is only 16- I don't have a job, my only 'job' is creating art : ( I will try my very best to do something about them. I'll ask my teacher if she can rehome them in return for new birds.

I will try my very best to help as much as I can!
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 11:06 AM
EllenD's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Senegal Parrot named "Kane"; Yellow-Sided Green Cheek Conure named "Bowie"; Blue Quaker Parrot named "Lita Ford"; Cockatiel named "Duff"; 8 American/English Budgie Hybrids; Ringneck Dove named "Dylan"
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: State College, PA
Thanks: 6,221
Thanked 7,153 Times in 2,944 Posts
EllenD will become famous soon enough
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

Yeah, Kiwi nailed this...There are many, many, many things wrong here, and not just wrong, but potentially fatal to the birds. First of all, if the birds are inside of a cage where they are chewing the paint/powdercoating/metal off of the bars, this is a very dangerous situation that is going to end in tragedy, as it usually does. Any time this happens the birds must be moved into a new cage, preferably one that is not painted or coated with anything that can be chewed off by the birds.

However, there is a very good reason that these birds are chewing on the cage!!! It's because they are absolutely bored to tears! These guys have the intelligence of a 4 year-old human child, and they have one perch and one toy? That's it? They should have a minimum of 6-10 different toys at any one time, and each toy should be a different type of toy-one for chewing (wooden), one for shredding, one for foraging, etc. And for both their mental and physical health they need multiple perches, each made of different materials and different sizes; if they are simply sitting on one perch (probably a wooden or plastic dowel) and that's it, they are going to get Bumblefoot and other foot conditions. The main issue though is the lack of stimulation! They never get out of the cage to fly, so no exercise or interaction/stimulation there, and they have 1 measly toy. They are becoming more and more aggressive and most likely starting to over-preen due to boredom and stress. This is going to turn into self-mutilation and feather-destructive behavior very quickly.

Now, the breeding situation...This is awful, and for a bunch of reasons...First of all, do they have both a Cuttlebone and a Mineral Block inside of the cage at all times? If not, the female is going to eventually develop a calcium-deficiency and is at great-risk for becoming Egg-Bound, which is 100% fatal if not intervened with instantly.

The fact that the female is laying clutch after clutch after clutch is worrisome. Cockatiels are prone to chronic egg-laying, and removing their eggs is causing her to lay more and more. So they either need to remove each real egg as they are laid and then freeze them overnight or boil them and then put them back in the nest, and do this with each egg as she lays them, or they need to buy fake Cockatiel eggs and simply replace each egg with a fake one. And you need to leave the eggs in with the female until she loses interest in laying on them on her own. At that point she'll just stop laying on them and she'll start ignoring them, then you can throw them out. But if they are removed before she loses interest in them on her own, she's just being triggered to lay another clutch.

These birds shouldn't be breeding in this situation anyway...I don't think anyone has yet to ask what the bird's regular, daily diet is, but I'm going to assume it's a bagged seed-mix? Is that it? Or are they eating a pellet diet? Do they get fresh veggies every day? How about some Egg-Food for the female? Laying clutch after clutch after clutch of eggs is extremely stressful on the female's body, and it quickly will become apparent that she's starting to suffer physically because of it; their feathers eventually start becoming dull and patchy (and they also often start plucking), they become very skinny, their eyes become dull, they often start open-mouth breathing all the time, it actually looks like they are panting like a dog does constantly, 24/7, their bones become brittle and they start to have trouble moving/walking without pain, and this is because the calcium is being leeched from their bones to make eggs, etc. This is what is going to happen if these birds continue to lay clutch after clutch.

Is there a nestbox in the cage with them? If so, then you need to talk to whomever is "in-charge" or whomever owns these birds about trying to stop them from breeding anymore, and the first thing they need to do (after the cuttlebone, mineral block, Egg-Food, etc) is to remove any nest-boxes or nesting material that is anywhere in the cage to try to discourage them from breeding. The next thing is to try to get a handle on their natural light schedule. They should be on a natural light schedule, where they are able to see the sunrise and sunset through a window naturally, and they should ideally be covered and put to bed right as they watch the sunset, and be awakened and uncovered with the sunrise. This will help tremendously to calm their hormones.

I commend you for trying to help these birds, it's not your responsibility and I thank you for caring about them, as this is a bad situation for parrots to be in. Unfortunately parrots do not make good classroom pets/animals at all, simply due to their needs and how much stress negatively effects them...and also because it's not a situation where they are going to be able to get any out-of-cage-time at all, they are locked inside a cage 24/7, and if this is the case and they don't have a ton of different toys and foraging activities inside of the cage they are locked in 24/7, that's when they become stressed, they become aggressive, and they start breeding continually, which starts the serious health issues for the female. They just are not good classroom animals. No one is there after what, 4:00-5:00 at the latest? So they get no stimulation, no time to fly around, no exercise at all, they just sit inside a cage with literally nothing to do. 1 toy inside any parrot's cage is shameful, let alone with 2 cockatiels.

It doesn't sound to me like whomever is in-charge of this vet-lab program knows anything at all about caring for parrots, their needs, their wants, their requirements, and how horrible allowing them to constantly breed is...And if they removed the eggs anyway, that indicates that they aren't purposely trying to breed them anyway, or wanting them to breed, right? So why are they putting them into a situation where they have nothing to do but breed? Don't get me wrong, I'm thrilled that this isn't a situation where they're purposely trying to get them to breed so that they can raise baby birds....that would be absolutely horrible. But if an adult is going to take-on keeping a bonded breeding-pair of parrots in their classroom at a school, then they should know enough to do all of the research and educate themselves, which this person obviously hasn't done...They would be much better-off either having a single bird, or having 2 males or 2 females, or putting these two birds into separate cages right beside each other so that they can no longer mate, but they can still see each other, talk to each other, and interact. Sometimes this is what has to be done for the welfare of the female.

I hope that you're able to talk to this teacher or whoever it is that runs this program, sit down with them and explain to them that these 2 birds are becoming aggressive because they are both extremely stressed due to#1) Utter and complete boredom, #2) A total lack of mental stimulation, #3) A total lack of physical exercise, #4) Hormonal issues caused by the constant breeding and the situation with the constant egg-laying, etc. Tell them that the female is in great-danger of developing serious and potentially lethal health conditions due to the chronic egg-laying, and that she does not have any of the things that she needs to keep her from becoming calcium-deficient, such as the Cuttlebone, a large Mineral Block, Egg-Food in her food bowl every day, fresh veggies every day (dark, leafy greens specifically), etc. And someone, I don't know who but someone is going to have to bite the bullet and go out and buy a lot of different types of toys for these guys, they must have at least 6-10 different toys, the more the better, along with a bunch of new perches made of different materials like different branch-perches of different diameters, at least one sand-perch to keep their toenails from needing clipped, etc. They need some ladders to climb. They need some rope toys or plastic chains hanging that they can climb up and down and swing from. They're extremely intelligent and they are being slowly killed due to a total lack of mental and physical stimulation. If all these 2 birds do is sit inside a locked cage with no toys and nothing at all to do all day long for years but breed and chronically lay eggs, then they are much better being re-homed to either a private individual who has parrot experience and that does not want to use them as breeders, or at the very least they need to be surrendered to a reputable Avian Rescue who can get them into a proper environment with proper mental and physical stimulation, get them on a proper diet, stop the breeding, and find them a loving and responsible forever home. Because this is not at all good for them...
__________________
"Dance Like Nobody's Watching".
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to EllenD For This Useful Post:
socktheconure (08-16-2018)
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 11:08 AM
EllenD's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Senegal Parrot named "Kane"; Yellow-Sided Green Cheek Conure named "Bowie"; Blue Quaker Parrot named "Lita Ford"; Cockatiel named "Duff"; 8 American/English Budgie Hybrids; Ringneck Dove named "Dylan"
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: State College, PA
Thanks: 6,221
Thanked 7,153 Times in 2,944 Posts
EllenD will become famous soon enough
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

I was just thinking about this situation, it's worrisome to me and should be to any bird-owners/lovers; this is not the first time we've had someone like you who cares about living creatures and who has posted about a classroom pet that isn't being given what it needs to keep it happy and healthy...If you have to, show your teacher or whomever is in-charge of this program or who owns these birds this thread. Let them read our responses. Because I wouldn't be surprised if they don't take what you're telling them seriously. We'd be happy to talk to them directly if they want to make an account here in the community. Or they could email us if they feel more comfortable doing that. I'm sure they meant well when they set this whole thing up, and it's a great idea to get young people familiar with taking care of different types of living creatures. And some creatures are perfect for a classroom setting like this, like a lot of different reptiles and amphibians, certain rodents, etc. I am also a long-time reptile person, and as long as they do their research and ensure that they get the exact, proper lighting, diet, and supplement requirements for each different species of reptile correct, there are a lot of reptiles and amphibians that are perfect for a "vet-labe" inside of a school, as they don't require the same mental and physical stimulation as parrots do, most of them actually don't require much at all, and as long as their habitat is kept at the correct temperature or temperature zones, correct humidity (if applicable), they have the correct type of UVB lighting and heat lighting set-up and changed-out for new bulbs as needed, and they feed them the appropriate diet of live insects, fresh veggies, fresh fruit, etc. for each specific species, these guys can be extremely happy living in a classroom environment. Unfortunately, parrots are more like people than they are animals.

I mean, I'm sure that this teacher would never, ever, ever think of going out and buying a dog and keeping it inside of a cage in the classroom 24/7 with no toys, no activities at all for them to do, no exercise at all, nothing to do, no one to play with them, only letting them out to go to the bathroom and that's it, and leaving them alone inside of the cage every single day at 4:00 p.m. until the next morning when class starts, and then completely on the weekends. That would probably sound absurd to your teacher...So why do they think it's perfectly fine to do that to a parrot that has the intelligence of a 4 year-old human child?
__________________
"Dance Like Nobody's Watching".
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to EllenD For This Useful Post:
socktheconure (08-16-2018)
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 12:07 PM
itzjbean's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
Boo - whiteface cockatiel DOB 2011. Ember - pastelface pearl cockatiel, DOB March 30, 2018. Rue - pearl cockatiel DOB 2012.
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Iowa, USA
Thanks: 2,679
Thanked 3,176 Times in 1,440 Posts
itzjbean is on a distinguished road
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

What is the possibility of you taking in these two cockatiels and giving them a better home? Would the teacher allow you to do that? Based on your budget we can help you find a nice cage and really turn their sad situation around.
__________________
- Jackie, Boo , Rue & Ember

See more of my flock on Instagram!
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 12:46 PM
Kiwibird's Avatar
Senior Member
Parrots:
1 BFA- Kiwi. Hatch circa 98', forever home with us Dec. 08'
Join Date: Jul 2012
Thanks: 8,407
Thanked 16,061 Times in 6,291 Posts
Kiwibird will become famous soon enough
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

I am actually starting to wonder- what are these birds for anyways? I mean, what purpose do they serve as a teaching tool if they are aggressive, unhandleable and not given an environment conducive to exhibiting normal behaviors?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2018, 01:42 PM
socktheconure's Avatar
Junior Member
Parrots:
Sock (conure) Yondu (blue budgie) Quill (yellow/blue budgie)
Join Date: Aug 2018
Thanks: 5
Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
socktheconure is on a distinguished road
Re: [HELP!] School Cockatiels are Incredibly Aggressive

My parents refuse to accept any more pets.

I would take them in if they would let me.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community > ParrotForums.com > New Members Welcome

Tags
aggresion, cockatiel, cockatiel breeding, egg-laying, health
Remove Ads

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Greys and school eliholtman Congo & Timneh Greys 11 10-11-2017 08:37 AM
Am I just lucky or doing something incredibly wrong? RyanL Budgies/Parakeets 5 07-10-2017 04:07 AM
Going away for School. CharlieTheAnon Budgies/Parakeets 4 08-17-2014 06:10 PM
Incredibly Aggressive GCC D: Argy Conures 5 09-15-2013 05:13 PM
can i convert indoor cockatiels to oustide aviary cockatiels? narufry Cockatiels 13 01-10-2013 06:35 PM



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.