My parrots attack each other

manudrei

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Apr 17, 2023
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Hi everyone,
let me introduce myself. My name is Manuel, i have three parrots:
- A male Sun Conure called Sunshine, it has 5 years old.
- A female Black headed Caique called Giuggiola, it has 1 year and 9 months
- A female Rose-ringed parakeet called Pandora, it has 10 months.
From two days Sunshine started to attack Giuggiola and viceversa, i dont know why. They’ve been together for over a year, been in the same aviary all the time, sleeping one next to the other. In this period of time, this kind of behavior had never happened. Can be hormones?
Because a week ago we notice Giuggiola couples with my hand. Sunshine started to couple with my girlsfriend hand three years ago but it did only in the breeding period.
3 months ago we took to home Pandora, a wild-female Rose-ringed parakeet, breeder
 

zERo

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I would say, it sounds like hormones to me.
For the time being, I wouldn’t let them all put together, just to avoid fights.

The best thing you can do is make sure they get 12 hours of sleep, limit excess carbs/sugar/protein/fat in the diet, and don’t offer any place that is dark and nest-like!
 

DonnaBudgie

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Jan 24, 2023
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I would say, it sounds like hormones to me.
For the time being, I wouldn’t let them all put together, just to avoid fights.

The best thing you can do is make sure they get 12 hours of sleep, limit excess carbs/sugar/protein/fat in the diet, and don’t offer any place that is dark and nest-like!
If you want to avoid carbs, sugar, protein and fats, what do you feed them? Aren't all nutrients at least one of these?
 

zERo

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If you want to avoid carbs, sugar, protein and fats, what do you feed them? Aren't all nutrients at least one of these?
I didn’t mean don’t feed them at all, you need all of those nutrients to survive, just limit them or reduce them.
Or you can limit foods highest in them like feed less banana because of the sugar, feed less nuts because of fat, feed less pasta because of carbs etc.
 

DonnaBudgie

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I didn’t mean don’t feed them at all, you need all of those nutrients to survive, just limit them or reduce them.
Or you can limit foods highest in them like feed less banana because of the sugar, feed less nuts because of fat, feed less pasta because of carbs etc.
Which is the least problematic nutrient?
 

zERo

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Which is the least problematic nutrient?
I guess that would depend on the species of bird and the individual bird itself.
For example, why my GCC is hormonal he can’t have peas, but peas don’t seem to add to my Quakers hormonal actions.
 

wrench13

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Issues with hormones and puberty is so common, I wrote this little synopis. I am going to highlight sections that might help the OP.

Parrots go thru puberty, just like humans do, because their internal metabolism tells the body –“Hey time to start thinking of babies”. When that happens, their little bodies get flooded for the first time with hormones. The when is only estimated, puberty can occur from 6 months or so for small parrots like budgies, cockatiels and parrotlets, with the larger parrots taking longer, progressively. Macaws and cockatoos, it could be a year or more before it starts. Puberty (and successive mating seasons) is not a precisely timed event. Depending on the individual parrot, it might occur earlier or later then the norm for that species, and other factors come into play on when it starts.

Like human children (and our parrots are so close in temperament to children), puberty can bring on all sorts of behavioral changes, which the parrot has absolutely no control over. One minute they are their normal selves and all of a sudden, BAM, they bite you, and the next second they are back to their normal selves. Mood swings like this are so common that for inexperienced parrot owners, this is the time when parrots are most often given up or surrendered. They can do a 180 degree turn and formerly the person who was THE person is now like yesterday’s news and the parrot might fixate on another member of the family (and it might not be one who actually likes parrots!). This does not happen every time, but it does happen, and the former favorite person needs to wheedle and scheme to get back into the parrots inner circle.

Some other behavior you might encounter:

  • Trying to mate with objects like toys or food bowls, even your hand. Butt rubbing is what this looks like.
  • Shredding paper, bedding, or any material that can be made into nest like stuff
  • Seeking dark hidey places
  • Being abnormally loud and making new clucking noises or others
Puberty can last anywhere from a few months to a year or so in larger parrots, again depending on species and the individual parrot. The 2 things to take away on this is that it will come to an end eventually and the other is to try and not let unwanted behavior become normal or habitual.

And now we come to mating season. Most parrots go through an annual mating season. Species like Eclectus parrots and a few other rare ones can have mating season at any time the environment produces mating triggers. For the rest, its once a year. Mating season is triggered by some things we can control and others that we cannot. The behavioral result of mating season is very similar to the ones displayed in puberty, with the exception of switching allegiances to a new person, which is rare. Uncontrollable rapid mood swings are pretty common and can vary with the intensity of the hormone release. Some years mating season can be pretty mild, and some are just killer for the poor parrot, as the drive to mate is frustrated (unless you are a breeder). The diurnal cycle of daylight to night time is one of the stronger triggers. Some folks keep their parrots on a day/night cycle that mirrors this, while others keep a 12hr day/night cycle. Either one has its pros and cons and we won’t get into that here.

Some things you can do to reduce (but never 100% eliminate) the effects of mating season are:

  • Remove any shreddy type materials and limit access to them when the parrot is out of the cage
  • Prevent access to dark hidey holes
  • No touching the parrot anywhere except for the head and neck. This is a biggie as this can be interpreted as mating behavior by the parrot.
  • Limit or remove sugar bearing foods, like fruits and high fructose foods like corn, any pasta, etc
  • Lots of exercise – a tired parrot is less likely to indulge in mating behavior
Always keep in mind that the parrot has no control of itself during these periods! A bite received during them is 100% different than a bite you might get because the bird is angry with you. You should not use “shunning” or other methods to modify the behavior, because they have no more idea of why they bit you then you do. But, same as a normal bite, you should try to avoid being in a situation where the bite COULD occur. Cuddling with your parrot, giving/getting kisses or letting them near the face during mating season is likely not a good idea! Along these lines, during mating season, try to not let behavior like biting, humping or other outward signs become habitual.

Finally – always, always remember – “THIS TOO SHALL PASS”. Your loving friend is still in there and will be back!
 

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