Adopting an Amazon in need

Lexi_035

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May 24, 2022
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Hello!
I have recently come across an Amazon parrot in need of a home! She is still quite young and is wild caught and was raised with nestum here in Mexico. She has quite a sad story, but the owner has finally decided to give her away to a new family, I'm the one chosen to get her. The problem is I'm not familiar with Amazon parrots as they are highly illegal and endangered where I live, she cannot be rehabilitated since she was taken as a baby, and now (she is around 5 years old) she doesn't know how to fly yet and our rehabilitation programs suck with adult birds. I only have experience with cockatiels as I find them lovely and they are quite legal everywhere. I come here looking for advice, I know she is still quite young for an Amazon and I will have my avian vet take a look at her ASAP when she arrives (June 7th). I may buy a large dog crate as a quarantine while the vet gets her cleared of any diseases. Any comments are appreciated. I will share a photo of her
 

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Welcome! I highly suggest you read and understand all the stickies at the top of the page on our Amazon sub-forum. The "Understanding Amazon Body Language" and the "i Love AMazons" ones have critical information on Amazons.
 
The quarantine is definitely a good idea!!! I would keep your new zon in a different room, as far away from the current birds as possible, even after the vet appointment. 6 weeks is the length I usually go for when quarantining. Avian diseases are airborne, so being in the same room can be dangerous if the amazon has an illness that he's not showing symptoms for yet. It also gives everyone a chance to hear each other before they have to meet each other, and flock calling/chattering can build some trust over time that makes the introduction easier in my experience. Granted, I don't think your zon and your cockatiels should be interacting directly, the size difference is too much and your tiels could be in danger.

Thank you for rescuing a bird in need!! I wish I could give you advice on behavior/training for amazons, but alas I don't have direct experience with that species--my impression is that they're very smart, very quirky, and full of personality. As much as I'm usually not a fan of things like pet influencers or youtube videos with birds, maybe watch some videos with amazons in them to get an idea of their body language, my experience handling them when volunteering at a shelter in my area has been that their body language is kind of different than other birds and there may be a learning curve. Hopefully the stickies and amazon forum here will be helpful for you.
 
I have a RLA got him at about seven years old.
He is gonna be 20 soon and super social, sweet, even tempered bird.

Let her know she arrived in paradise with you her best friend and most trusted human, and that everything you do with her is for her benefit and fun and safety.
Its all about building trust and a solid bond.
Read all of what Wrench says.

We really took it at primor's pace. and before we were able to handle him i made sure that only good sounds came from my face. Whistling, singing...
 
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I have a RLA got him at about seven years old.
He is gonna be 20 soon and super social, sweet, even tempered bird.

Let her know she arrived in paradise with you her best friend and most trusted human, and that everything you do with her is for her benefit and fun and safety.
Its all about building trust and a solid bond.
Read all of what Wrench says.

We really took it at primor's pace. and before we were able to handle him i made sure that only good sounds came from my face. Whistling, si
The quarantine is definitely a good idea!!! I would keep your new zon in a different room, as far away from the current birds as possible, even after the vet appointment. 6 weeks is the length I usually go for when quarantining. Avian diseases are airborne, so being in the same room can be dangerous if the amazon has an illness that he's not showing symptoms for yet. It also gives everyone a chance to hear each other before they have to meet each other, and flock calling/chattering can build some trust over time that makes the introduction easier in my experience. Granted, I don't think your zon and your cockatiels should be interacting directly, the size difference is too much and your tiels could be in danger.

Thank you for rescuing a bird in need!! I wish I could give you advice on behavior/training for amazons, but alas I don't have direct experience with that species--my impression is that they're very smart, very quirky, and full of personality. As much as I'm usually not a fan of things like pet influencers or youtube videos with birds, maybe watch some videos with amazons in them to get an idea of their body language, my experience handling them when volunteering at a shelter in my area has been that their body language is kind of different than other birds and there may be a learning curve. Hopefully the stickies and amazon forum here will be helpful for you.
Thank you! I'm watching a bunch of amazon specific videos about behavior and even how to build trust with a rescue bird! I will take really seriously the quarantine, we had an outbreak of avian flu near so I'm going to take extra precautions just in case.
 
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I have a RLA got him at about seven years old.
He is gonna be 20 soon and super social, sweet, even tempered bird.

Let her know she arrived in paradise with you her best friend and most trusted human, and that everything you do with her is for her benefit and fun and safety.
Its all about building trust and a solid bond.
Read all of what Wrench says.

We really took it at primor's pace. and before we were able to handle him i made sure that only good sounds came from my face. Whistling, singing...
Thank you! Shall do all of that, I'm quite afraid of the beak but I guess the more I handle her the more I will get used to it hahaha.
 
I had a rescue RLA and she passed away in 2017.
She was a sweet bird and really loved me.
when I would come home at night from work she was always happy to see me. Quivering her wings and whistling her distinctive call.
She liked neck scratches but had a tendency to suddenly turn and bite me in the middle of scratches.

took me years to be able to anticipate her sudden switch from sweet bird to snapping turtle.
Her whole body would tens up like a coiled spring just before a bite . I was able to avoid most of her bites after that.

There are lots of body language that is common between amazon species but each bird has it’s own “tells” that let you know to look out. (Hmm I know my grammar is off but I am not going to straighten it out.)
 

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