Best bird for doctor's office

highAZheat

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Hello -

I'm obviously new to the forum, but this is probably the best place to get advice for my situation.

I am a doctor at a busy office, and would like animals - ideally birds - to brighten the mood. I already have a beautiful reef fish tank, but want more interactive animals as well. The office will be busy 5 days a week for about 10 hours a day with a young (20s-30s yo) staff and mostly healthy middle age adults undergoing minor elective procedures. There won't be someone present regularly on the weekends, at least not for extended periods of time. My questions are simple:

Is this a good environment for any birds at all?
If so, any recommendations on species?
Based on the species, what would be an ideal number of birds?

My thinking is a very large cage with more than enough room (possibly with partitions and definitely with multiple food/water sources) and plenty of toys. I was thinking either 2 pairs of parakeets (ideally different colors), or a pair of rainbow lorikeets. I have also thought about 1-2 pairs of cockatiels (have owned in the past and loved them), but I prefer more visually colorful birds than cockatiels. I have read that canaries and finches might be good office pets as well. Given the time away from humans, I would only buy in pairs/multiples. I think parakeets might be ideal due to their colors and size and temperament. Lorikeets would be fun and visually gorgeous, but might be too loud for an office setting.

Any feedback on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

DonnaBudgie

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Hello -

I'm obviously new to the forum, but this is probably the best place to get advice for my situation.

I am a doctor at a busy office, and would like animals - ideally birds - to brighten the mood. I already have a beautiful reef fish tank, but want more interactive animals as well. The office will be busy 5 days a week for about 10 hours a day with a young (20s-30s yo) staff and mostly healthy middle age adults undergoing minor elective procedures. There won't be someone present regularly on the weekends, at least not for extended periods of time. My questions are simple:

Is this a good environment for any birds at all?
If so, any recommendations on species?
Based on the species, what would be an ideal number of birds?

My thinking is a very large cage with more than enough room (possibly with partitions and definitely with multiple food/water sources) and plenty of toys. I was thinking either 2 pairs of parakeets (ideally different colors), or a pair of rainbow lorikeets. I have also thought about 1-2 pairs of cockatiels (have owned in the past and loved them), but I prefer more visually colorful birds than cockatiels. I have read that canaries and finches might be good office pets as well. Given the time away from humans, I would only buy in pairs/multiples. I think parakeets might be ideal due to their colors and size and temperament. Lorikeets would be fun and visually gorgeous, but might be too loud for an office setting.

Any feedback on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Fish are used as living decor in doctors' offices and I think that's fine. I don't think it's a good idea to have birds in a doctors office as entertainment, ambiance, or decor. They are loud, very messy, need a lot of attention, and some people are allergic to birds or afraid of birds. Who would be there on nights, weekends and holidays to care for them and provide them with veterinary care? A bad idea, all around.
 

LaManuka

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Hello -

I'm obviously new to the forum, but this is probably the best place to get advice for my situation.

I am a doctor at a busy office, and would like animals - ideally birds - to brighten the mood. I already have a beautiful reef fish tank, but want more interactive animals as well. The office will be busy 5 days a week for about 10 hours a day with a young (20s-30s yo) staff and mostly healthy middle age adults undergoing minor elective procedures. There won't be someone present regularly on the weekends, at least not for extended periods of time. My questions are simple:

Is this a good environment for any birds at all?
If so, any recommendations on species?
Based on the species, what would be an ideal number of birds?

My thinking is a very large cage with more than enough room (possibly with partitions and definitely with multiple food/water sources) and plenty of toys. I was thinking either 2 pairs of parakeets (ideally different colors), or a pair of rainbow lorikeets. I have also thought about 1-2 pairs of cockatiels (have owned in the past and loved them), but I prefer more visually colorful birds than cockatiels. I have read that canaries and finches might be good office pets as well. Given the time away from humans, I would only buy in pairs/multiples. I think parakeets might be ideal due to their colors and size and temperament. Lorikeets would be fun and visually gorgeous, but might be too loud for an office setting.

Any feedback on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Others may have some suggestions and/or info for you on this question, but as far as lorikeets are concerned I would strongly advise against having them in the type of environment that you've described. They are VERY messy, super high-octane birds who require a very specialised diet that needs to be changed out several times per day and would not do well being left without daily care. They also don't do so well with just being left in a cage, too energetic and far too intelligent really. And just dealing with liquid projectile lorikeet poop being squirted about the place would be enough to rule them out, in my opinion at least.

Honestly I'm not so sure if birds in an office is something that I'd recommend anyway - I've seen a few very rare examples of budgies/parakeets in hospices or retirement homes but someone generally ends up complaining about the mess and/or the noise. But for me, lorikeets would be an unsuitable choice.
 

DonnaBudgie

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Others may have some suggestions and/or info for you on this question, but as far as lorikeets are concerned I would strongly advise against having them in the type of environment that you've described. They are VERY messy, super high-octane birds who require a very specialised diet that needs to be changed out several times per day and would not do well being left without daily care. They also don't do so well with just being left in a cage, too energetic and far too intelligent really. And just dealing with liquid projectile lorikeet poop being squirted about the place would be enough to rule them out, in my opinion at least.

Honestly I'm not so sure if birds in an office is something that I'd recommend anyway - I've seen a few very rare examples of budgies/parakeets in hospices or retirement homes but someone generally ends up complaining about the mess and/or the noise. But for me, lorikeets would be an unsuitable choice.
I was a pharmaceutical sales rep for 12 years and spent all my working hours in doctors' offices. I could not imagine a doctor's office keeping birds there. A rare office would have a cat wandering around brought in occasionally only during working hours but patients' allergies made it impossible.
 

Jcas

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This is an interesting idea and if you decide to go through with it, I would probably recommend finches in a large flight cage as the best choice. They are quieter, being smaller, they can get a fair amount of exercise even confined to a large cage, and if there is a little flock they seem to be happy enough with each other’s company without too much human interaction. That being said, I don’t want to rain on your parade but you very responsibly asked if this would be a good idea, and I honestly don’t think it would. Four reasons:
1) some people are afraid of birds. I’ve met a lot of people who aren’t comfortable around birds. Most people who meet my budgies are made nervous by their quick jerky movements.
2) Birds are messy. They poop a LOT. Having a birdcage in the office would be almost like having a cat’s litter box in the office. Birds also throw around their food, splash water, and shed feathers.
3) Some people are very allergic to birds. Birds produce a lot of feather dust and for people with asthma, allergies, or other lung issues, this can be a serious problem.
4) cleaning products. I assume a doctor’s office needs to be pretty sterile and unfortunately most cleaning/ disinfecting products have fumes that are very toxic to birds.

I’m glad you’re asking before jumping into this! Good luck with your decision ❤️
 
OP
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highAZheat

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This is an interesting idea and if you decide to go through with it, I would probably recommend finches in a large flight cage as the best choice. They are quieter, being smaller, they can get a fair amount of exercise even confined to a large cage, and if there is a little flock they seem to be happy enough with each other’s company without too much human interaction. That being said, I don’t want to rain on your parade but you very responsibly asked if this would be a good idea, and I honestly don’t think it would. Four reasons:
1) some people are afraid of birds. I’ve met a lot of people who aren’t comfortable around birds. Most people who meet my budgies are made nervous by their quick jerky movements.
2) Birds are messy. They poop a LOT. Having a birdcage in the office would be almost like having a cat’s litter box in the office. Birds also throw around their food, splash water, and shed feathers.
3) Some people are very allergic to birds. Birds produce a lot of feather dust and for people with asthma, allergies, or other lung issues, this can be a serious problem.
4) cleaning products. I assume a doctor’s office needs to be pretty sterile and unfortunately most cleaning/ disinfecting products have fumes that are very toxic to birds.

I’m glad you’re asking before jumping into this! Good luck with your decision ❤️
Interesting that you and DonnaBudgie both brought up people being afraid of birds (even small birds), which I honestly hadn't considered. I was thinking some children might be afraid, but we don't have any child patients, and it's rare for adult patients to bring their kids. But you're right, I suppose some adults might be afraid of or allergic to birds. I love birds so I just assume everyone either likes them or is ambivalent, but I hadn't considered that some people might be afraid of them.

The comments so far have confirmed my misgivings. As much as I would *like* to have birds around the office, probably not wise or practical.
 

wrench13

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Sorry, Doc, my opinion is this is a bad idea. My dog's vet has a Yellow Nape amazon as their office mascot, but they are open 6 days a week and for at least 8-10 hrs every day, and one of the nurses comes in on Sunday to feed and water him and play a bit with him. Even then he is not a very friendly parrot.
 

DonnaBudgie

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Interesting that you and DonnaBudgie both brought up people being afraid of birds (even small birds), which I honestly hadn't considered. I was thinking some children might be afraid, but we don't have any child patients, and it's rare for adult patients to bring their kids. But you're right, I suppose some adults might be afraid of or allergic to birds. I love birds so I just assume everyone either likes them or is ambivalent, but I hadn't considered that some people might be afraid of them.

The comments so far have confirmed my misgivings. As much as I would *like* to have birds around the office, probably not wise or practical.
Being a bird person I would LOVE to see birds everywhere but other people- not so much. How could anyone not like birds? I don't get it but whatever.
I have six budgies in very mess resistant plexiglass cages and if I wanted my house to be as clean as a doctor's office should be I would need to run my robot vacuum cleaner, Rodney, constantly!
 

texsize

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If you were to treat them as family members.
Take home every evening (and weekends) and bring to work every day..
Maybe I would be ok with that.
I would be concerned about smells, odors, and what disinfectant might be used in the building.
Lot of things You can’t use around birds.
 

Free as a bird

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Hello -

I'm obviously new to the forum, but this is probably the best place to get advice for my situation.

I am a doctor at a busy office, and would like animals - ideally birds - to brighten the mood. I already have a beautiful reef fish tank, but want more interactive animals as well. The office will be busy 5 days a week for about 10 hours a day with a young (20s-30s yo) staff and mostly healthy middle age adults undergoing minor elective procedures. There won't be someone present regularly on the weekends, at least not for extended periods of time. My questions are simple:

Is this a good environment for any birds at all?
If so, any recommendations on species?
Based on the species, what would be an ideal number of birds?

My thinking is a very large cage with more than enough room (possibly with partitions and definitely with multiple food/water sources) and plenty of toys. I was thinking either 2 pairs of parakeets (ideally different colors), or a pair of rainbow lorikeets. I have also thought about 1-2 pairs of cockatiels (have owned in the past and loved them), but I prefer more visually colorful birds than cockatiels. I have read that canaries and finches might be good office pets as well. Given the time away from humans, I would only buy in pairs/multiples. I think parakeets might be ideal due to their colors and size and temperament. Lorikeets would be fun and visually gorgeous, but might be too loud for an office setting.

Any feedback on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

That's a great idea, very thoughtful.
I would love some aviary birds to see and hear while I'm waiting to see a doctor. It would create such a nice mood.

Budgies, cockatiels and lovebirds are ideal to put together, they are bright and colourful and have cheerful personalities. They are my recommendation. You used the term parakeet a few times but there are hundreds of species of them. I know budgies and cockatiels are parakeets and I think lovebirds are too

Stay away from lorikeets if you hate cleaning up. They eat soft foods and their poop is very messy. Generally speaking the bigger the bird the more effort is required to keep them.

Canaries and finches are great aviary birds as well. They come in a array of colours and patterns but they don't get along with parrots.
 

DonnaBudgie

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That's a great idea, very thoughtful.
I would love some aviary birds to see and hear while I'm waiting to see a doctor. It would create such a nice mood.

Budgies, cockatiels and lovebirds are ideal to put together, they are bright and colourful and have cheerful personalities. They are my recommendation. You used the term parakeet a few times but there are hundreds of species of them. I know budgies and cockatiels are parakeets and I think lovebirds are too

Stay away from lorikeets if you hate cleaning up. They eat soft foods and their poop is very messy. Generally speaking the bigger the bird the more effort is required to keep them.

Canaries and finches are great aviary birds as well. They come in a array of colours and patterns but they don't get along with parrots.
According to many sources, a "parakeet" is a long tailed parrot, but under that definition the largest hookbills, macaws, would be parakeets alongside budgies, one of the smallest, and so would all conures. And lovebirds and parrotlets (the smallest hookbills) would be parrots. The term obviously isn't well-defined. In the US where I live, budgies are parakeets and if I tell an American acquaintance that I have budgies they won't have any idea what I'm talking about, unless they're bird people. Most Americans don't know that there are many different kinds of parakeets other than budgies. At a Jimmy Buffett concert (RIP) his fans are "parrotheads" and their small children are "parakeets".
 

Free as a bird

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According to many sources, a "parakeet" is a long tailed parrot, but under that definition the largest hookbills, macaws, would be parakeets alongside budgies, one of the smallest, and so would all conures. And lovebirds and parrotlets (the smallest hookbills) would be parrots. The term obviously isn't well-defined. In the US where I live, budgies are parakeets and if I tell an American acquaintance that I have budgies they won't have any idea what I'm talking about, unless they're bird people. Most Americans don't know that there are many different kinds of parakeets other than budgies. At a Jimmy Buffett concert (RIP) his fans are "parrotheads" and their small children are "parakeets".
Ok so when the op or any American says "parakeet" their probably referring to the budgie.

That parakeet definition is very brief. A better definition would be this one from Britannica dictionary
"seed-eating parrots of small size, slender build, and long, tapering tail"

So that rules out large parrots like macaws and non seed eaters like lorikeets.
If you search for Australian parakeet chart you will find this.
Screenshot_20231213-163054_Samsung Internet.jpg

It's hard to see the chart but the largest Aussie parakeet is the King parrot which weighs between 200-275g according to most sources. I've seen them in the wild and I would not call them "small" but their on the chart

So the term parakeet is fairly well defined, any parrot under about 275g that is a granivore and has a long tapered tail is most probably a parakeet.
 
Last edited:

DonnaBudgie

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Ok so when the op or any American says "parakeet" their probably referring to the budgie.

That parakeet definition is very brief. A better definition would be this one from Britannica dictionary
"seed-eating parrots of small size, slender build, and long, tapering tail"

So that rules out large parrots like macaws and non seed eaters like lorikeets.
If you search for Australian parakeet chart you will find this.
View attachment 56616
It's hard to see the chart but the largest Aussie parakeet is the King parrot which weighs between 200-275g according to most sources. I've seen them in the wild and I would not call them "small" but their on the chart

So the term parakeet is fairly well defined, any parrot under about 275g that is a granivore and has a long tapered tail is most probably a parakeet.
When someone in the US says they have a parakeet they almost always mean they have a budgie.

I ONLY gave the short, simple, inadequate, and incorrect definition of parrot short tail vs parakeet long tail because it's the most common one I've heard here in the US. That doesn't mean I agree with it.

Remember that there are no native parrots or parakeets in the upper 49 US States other than possibly a Mexican Amazon once native to southern Arizona that may appear occasionally. Lots of escapees and escaped breeding colonies and pairs of various New World (mostly) hookbills. The native Carolina Parakeet (a bit like a Sun Conure) was hunted to extinction in the early 1900s. We here don't have the amazing hookbill avian life that Aussies, Central and South Americans, Africans and South Asians enjoy (but WE HAVE HUMMINGBIRDS!)
 

texsize

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Ok so when the op or any American says "parakeet" their probably referring to the budgie.

That parakeet definition is very brief. A better definition would be this one from Britannica dictionary
"seed-eating parrots of small size, slender build, and long, tapering tail"

So that rules out large parrots like macaws and non seed eaters like lorikeets.
If you search for Australian parakeet chart you will find this.
View attachment 56616
It's hard to see the chart but the largest Aussie parakeet is the King parrot which weighs between 200-275g according to most sources. I've seen them in the wild and I would not call them "small" but their on the chart

So the term parakeet is fairly well defined, any parrot under about 275g that is a granivore and has a long tapered tail is most probably a parakeet.
I am surprised the Cockatiel is considered a parakeet.
I know they have gone back/forth as to whether they are part of the cockaTOO family.
Like the eggs are good/no there bad argument.
I thought the needle had landed on cockatiels ARE in the TOO family
But that may not preclude them from being Keets As well.

Would you really be ok with leaving 2/3 Cockatiels completely alone for 2/3 days (you Aussies must have 3 day weekends)?
I am afraid to leave my Tiels alone for 2 hours because of their tendency towards “night fright “ and panic attacks.
They break blood feathers….. 1 in 5 times, to darned frequently.

Only if they could be taken home.
treated like family and not put on the service porch with the washer/dryer.

I think intelligent creatures deserve better than to be treated as a decoration.
I do like the idea of finches and canaries.
They sound pleasant and they are active fluttering around..
But they might be hard to catch to take home end of day.

another possible choice is morning doves or pigeons.
I love listening to the coo coo of morning doves.
 
OP
H

highAZheat

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When someone in the US says they have a parakeet they almost always mean they have a budgie.

I ONLY gave the short, simple, inadequate, and incorrect definition of parrot short tail vs parakeet long tail because it's the most common one I've heard here in the US. That doesn't mean I agree with it.

Remember that there are no native parrots or parakeets in the upper 49 US States other than possibly a Mexican Amazon once native to southern Arizona that may appear occasionally. Lots of escapees and escaped breeding colonies and pairs of various New World (mostly) hookbills. The native Carolina Parakeet (a bit like a Sun Conure) was hunted to extinction in the early 1900s. We here don't have the amazing hookbill avian life that Aussies, Central and South Americans, Africans and South Asians enjoy (but WE HAVE HUMMINGBIRDS!)
Exactly - to me budgies and parakeets are the same bird (which they *are* technically), but there are many more parakeet species than just budgies. But to my American mind when I see a budgie I think parakeet, which is why I used that term in the OP.

Thanks again for all the feedback. I thought about transporting them home every day as several people have suggested, but that would be a major hassle - probably not worth it. Will pass on the birds in office, as much as I would love to have them.
 

DonnaBudgie

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Exactly - to me budgies and parakeets are the same bird (which they *are* technically), but there are many more parakeet species than just budgies. But to my American mind when I see a budgie I think parakeet, which is why I used that term in the OP.

Thanks again for all the feedback. I thought about transporting them home every day as several people have suggested, but that would be a major hassle - probably not worth it. Will pass on the birds in office, as much as I would love to have them.
Perhaps setting up a large screen high definition TV with videos of colorful birds, beautifully videotaped, chirping and acting like birds, for patients to enjoy. I've seen offices use screens to show reef tanks without the mess, care commitment, and expense.
 

texsize

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Exactly - to me budgies and parakeets are the same bird (which they *are* technically), but there are many more parakeet species than just budgies. But to my American mind when I see a budgie I think parakeet, which is why I used that term in the OP.

Thanks again for all the feedback. I thought about transporting them home every day as several people have suggested, but that would be a major hassle - probably not worth it. Will pass on the birds in office, as much as I would love to have them.
My Dr. office has recessed fluorescent lights.
The plastic semi Transparent covering in my Dr office is like clouds and sky picture.
It really makes the room feel more open and adds a touch of class( least I felt like it did).

Lots of different styles and sizes to order.
https://www.amazon.com/Patelai-Fluo...1702494121&sprefix=Fluore,aps,183&sr=8-8&th=1
 

Free as a bird

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When someone in the US says they have a parakeet they almost always mean they have a budgie.

I ONLY gave the short, simple, inadequate, and incorrect definition of parrot short tail vs parakeet long tail because it's the most common one I've heard here in the US. That doesn't mean I agree with it.

Remember that there are no native parrots or parakeets in the upper 49 US States other than possibly a Mexican Amazon once native to southern Arizona that may appear occasionally. Lots of escapees and escaped breeding colonies and pairs of various New World (mostly) hookbills. The native Carolina Parakeet (a bit like a Sun Conure) was hunted to extinction in the early 1900s. We here don't have the amazing hookbill avian life that Aussies, Central and South Americans, Africans and South Asians enjoy (but WE HAVE HUMMINGBIRDS!)

How about southern Florida or Texas on tue edge of the Caribbean? Might I find any parrots there?
Hummingbirds are cool, we don't have them here.

We are lucky in Australia to have a wide range of birds including parrots so I feel blessed when I see them in the wild like the flock of 100+ corellas I was watching last weekend.

Interestingly but budgies and cockatiels never get seen by the average Australian. They live far from our cities in the harsh outback where nobody lives

I once read that there are no parrots above the equator. But there are parrots in India, central America and parts of Asia that are above the equator. So I took a closer look and concluded that there are no parrots north of the tropics
 

Free as a bird

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I am surprised the Cockatiel is considered a parakeet.
I know they have gone back/forth as to whether they are part of the cockaTOO family.
Like the eggs are good/no there bad argument.
I thought the needle had landed on cockatiels ARE in the TOO family
But that may not preclude them from being Keets As well.

Would you really be ok with leaving 2/3 Cockatiels completely alone for 2/3 days (you Aussies must have 3 day weekends)?
I am afraid to leave my Tiels alone for 2 hours because of their tendency towards “night fright “ and panic attacks.
They break blood feathers….. 1 in 5 times, to darned frequently.

Only if they could be taken home.
treated like family and not put on the service porch with the washer/dryer.

I think intelligent creatures deserve better than to be treated as a decoration.
I do like the idea of finches and canaries.
They sound pleasant and they are active fluttering around..
But they might be hard to catch to take home end of day.

another possible choice is morning doves or pigeons.
I love listening to the coo coo of morning doves.
Yea I was disappointed when I read that cockatiels are not part of the TOO family. Why not you scientist. Sometimes I think they just make up stuff. I was reading recently that cockatoos aren't parrots. The reasoning was poor to say the least

But tiels have a crest just like toos do, that's an extremely unique feature for parrots. They have a cheek patch the same as the yellow tail black and palm cockatoos. Their shaped like littpe toos and eat the same foods mainly seed. To me their just like little TOOs.

Iv had tiels in the past that used to have night frights. I find a night light helps. But I go camping for a night or two and leave my little ones with plenty of food and water. They go alright.

I don't mind birds in an aviary as long as it's big enough. They are probably happier in there with their own kind than with a human.
 

DonnaBudgie

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How about southern Florida or Texas on tue edge of the Caribbean? Might I find any parrots there?
Hummingbirds are cool, we don't have them here.

We are lucky in Australia to have a wide range of birds including parrots so I feel blessed when I see them in the wild like the flock of 100+ corellas I was watching last weekend.

Interestingly but budgies and cockatiels never get seen by the average Australian. They live far from our cities in the harsh outback where nobody lives

I once read that there are no parrots above the equator. But there are parrots in India, central America and parts of Asia that are above the equator. So I took a closer look and concluded that there are no parrots north of the tropics
There are no native parrots in ANY of the US States, including Hawaii. Arizona and New Mexico used to be home for the Thick Billed Parrot of northern and central Mexico. Rare now in Mexico, it looks like a bright green Amazon with a bright red forehead and shoulders and a large black beak. The ONLY other parrot native to the US was the now extinct Carolina Parakeet that roamed most of the US east of the Mississippi River and south of New York.

The US States have populations, some breeding, of about 25 non-native parrots including Nanday Conures, Quakers, several Amazons, lovebirds, budgies, etc.

Quite a few Parrots are native to non- tropical climates (places with fairly cold winters) like Argentina, Paraguay, New Zealand, etc.
 

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