Hearts broken

Lilguy

New member
Mar 24, 2022
2
19
Parrots
Cockatiel and a parakeet
Hi all, new here. We are devastated, our 6 month old parakeet Reggie just died. He was the love of our pet life and was just a joy with his chirping and learning to talk. He had his own cage kept next to our cockatiel Kiwi. They were buds, would spend the day chirping at one and other and would sit out side their cages next to each other. Came home last night with carry out dinner and they were both fine. Chirping up a storm looking for attention. I said I’d be back in a couple of hours and left. My wife got home first and called me in tears. Reggie was dead on the bottom of the cage. No sign of any injury and had shown no sign of illness. Ate well, fresh water, we are at a loss. Are parakeets just that fragile? Thanks
 

Owlet

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Oct 27, 2016
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Birds are fairly fragile. However, if the household is set up properly, most of their fragility can be avoided. Air fresheners such as aerosol, essential oils, and candles need to be avoided as they release fumes that a toxic to birds. Bird's have very fragile lungs that don't do well with unnatural fumes. If you need to "freshen" your house, it is recommended you boil some water and toss in cinnamon stick and orange peels. This releases a pleasant and natural odor that isn't harmful to our birds.

Another common household problem are object that are intended to be heated. Such as pots, space heaters, ovens, toasters, and etc. These products are commonly coated in teflon which when heated to a certain temperature or has something burnt on it, it will release fumes that aren't even good for us and downright deadly to our birds. Alternatives to these are stainless steel pots, ceramic space heaters, and other similarly non-teflon/nonstick products. You might have to do some research and calling around especially for basic kitchen appliances like toasters. These products are heavily debated as some say the fumes are only released under very specific circumstances, but it's better safe than sorry in my opinion.

Then comes the most unfortunate possibility, depending on where you got the bird he may or may not have had some sort of genetic defect that was undetectable until it was too late. This is unfortunately common especially with budgies and other smaller birds that are mass produced and shoved into pet stores with little to no regulation.

If possible I would advise having the body sent off for a necropsy just to make sure your other bird isn't in any danger from something contagious. If the you and the birds haven't been around any strange birds it's very unlikely that something contagious is passing through but it would be better to be safe. I would also recommend taking your other bird into the vet for a check up just to be safe.
 

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
12,591
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USA
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Full house
Ahhh...sorry for your loss.

Unfortunately birds evevolved to hide signs of health issues. And they will do everything to hide it. You didn't have to miss anything at all. Sudden death can be the only sign. Its heartbreaking and has happened to me and others.

Classic "sick bird" symptoms usually only appear 48 hrs or less from passing, the fluffed, not eating or moving or on bottom of cage .. its why we have to treat any symptoms if seen as serious.

Tracking weight ( very difficult in a budgie tho) is one of our few ways if picking up issues before they get serious. As most birds will start dropping weight , as sick burds can burn 3x normal calories and often can't keep up even if still eating. But anything rapid even that would miss.

Another is to be a poop watcher every day, to see if any changes in frequency, amount color, or form.... thats the best we can do . Because they really try to mask health issues.

So sorry.. its so hard to go through.
 
OP
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Lilguy

New member
Mar 24, 2022
2
19
Parrots
Cockatiel and a parakeet
  • Thread Starter
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Thanks all. We get our birds from a shop we’ve been dealing with for 30+ years. They raise their own birds so one can pick out a hand fed chick early on. We cook with SS and cast iron. Bird was active and eating two hours before being found dead. Poop looked normal from day one. Always singing even at times when napping during the day.
He looked like he was sleeping on his side, no blood, discharge or a feather out of place. Not sure if we should try again, cockatiel has flourished in the same environment, are they a much hardier bird?
 

Terry57

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I'm so sorry for your loss of Reggie. Sometimes there are no signs, one minute they seem fine and the next they are gone. It can be a genetic issue, or just a fluke that perhaps his heart wasn't strong enough.
I haven't found budgies to be more fragile than cockatiels, but mine have never lived as long as my cockatiels either.
I agree with taking your cockatiel to the vet just to make sure it was not something communicable that took Reggie.
I hope that you will try again, you obviously have a lot of love to give another bird.
 

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
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Thanks all. We get our birds from a shop we’ve been dealing with for 30+ years. They raise their own birds so one can pick out a hand fed chick early on. We cook with SS and cast iron. Bird was active and eating two hours before being found dead. Poop looked normal from day one. Always singing even at times when napping during the day.
He looked like he was sleeping on his side, no blood, discharge or a feather out of place. Not sure if we should try again, cockatiel has flourished in the same environment, are they a much hardier bird?
Budgies are just like other parrots and are not less hardy. I took in rehomed adults I've had for five years, snd experience to live a decade more.

As one poster mentioned, its probably a good idea to hsve an avian veterinarian exam your cockatiel, to be sure this wasn't a contagious disease, like chlamydia ( parrot fever).

One thing thst can effect health is diet. All seed diet lacks full nutrition. That effects immune system.
 

foxgloveparrot

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I’m so sorry about Reggie. I hope soon your pain fades and you can cherish happy memories of him.
There are genetic issues that can cause sudden death, but birds can also hide their illnesses very well. It hurts, but unfortunately you have nothing to do but let the tears flow. We’re here for you, okay? ❤️
 

GaleriaGila

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May 14, 2016
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So very, very sorry. I wish you some comfort in the knowledge that your darling passed into Eternity, foreverness I call it, while loved and treasured... so many little creatures don't. Thank you for sharing. I'm glad you're here.
 

Lydia123

New member
Mar 15, 2017
14
21
Birds are fairly fragile. However, if the household is set up properly, most of their fragility can be avoided. Air fresheners such as aerosol, essential oils, and candles need to be avoided as they release fumes that a toxic to birds. Bird's have very fragile lungs that don't do well with unnatural fumes. If you need to "freshen" your house, it is recommended you boil some water and toss in cinnamon stick and orange peels. This releases a pleasant and natural odor that isn't harmful to our birds.

Another common household problem are object that are intended to be heated. Such as pots, space heaters, ovens, toasters, and etc. These products are commonly coated in teflon which when heated to a certain temperature or has something burnt on it, it will release fumes that aren't even good for us and downright deadly to our birds. Alternatives to these are stainless steel pots, ceramic space heaters, and other similarly non-teflon/nonstick products. You might have to do some research and calling around especially for basic kitchen appliances like toasters. These products are heavily debated as some say the fumes are only released under very specific circumstances, but it's better safe than sorry in my opinion.

Then comes the most unfortunate possibility, depending on where you got the bird he may or may not have had some sort of genetic defect that was undetectable until it was too late. This is unfortunately common especially with budgies and other smaller birds that are mass produced and shoved into pet stores with little to no regulation.

If possible I would advise having the body sent off for a necropsy just to make sure your other bird isn't in any danger from something contagious. If the you and the birds haven't been around any strange birds it's very unlikely that something contagious is passing through but it would be better to be safe. I would also recommend taking your other bird into the vet for a check up just to be safe.
Very,very helpful post
 

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