Heat lamps?

Danny1

Member
Oct 18, 2023
29
23
Parrots
2 Sun Conure
Does anyone else offer their birds a heat source? During my research it doesn’t seem like something that is generally recommended or talked about at all however coming from the reptile hobby I have lots of supplies around and my sun conures (2 months old) really seem to love laying under the heat lamp. I’m using a very low heat output light that also gives a very low 3.0 uvb output that I have used for baby micro geckos even touching the bars right under the light and the lamp itself is pretty safe ( they don’t have access to the lamp). Doesn’t seem like it’s necessary for a bird to live a long and happy life but they really seem to like it. Curious as to if there is any downside to offering this or not.
 
So long as they can get away from the heat if they need to, if they seem to enjoy it I would say it’s just fine! Maybe just a few hours a day, at a maximum though. I don’t know if too much heat could damage their feathers?
 
I have read before that reptile lamps can be dangerous for parrots, it mentioned something about their eyes. I wouldn't let them lie under it just in case. Parrots do need UV light though, but it needs to be the sun or an avian lamp

I found it, at the bottom of this website, they're a shop so I don't know how legitimate it is but I wouldn't risk it
 
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I have read before that reptile lamps can be dangerous for parrots, it mentioned something about their eyes. I wouldn't let them lie under it just in case. Parrots do need UV light though, but it needs to be the sun or an avian lamp

I found it, at the bottom of this website, they're a shop so I don't know how legitimate it is but I wouldn't risk it
Hi Ty for the response you may be referring to the coil uvb bulbs that were on the market many years ago that were also causing eye issues in reptiles especially reptiles that were visual based like chameleons but these were said to be fixed some years back. The bulbs I am using are halogen bulbs. Can I ask how long ago you heard this and where? I would like to read up on it. Seems like the biggest recommended brand for uvb in birds is Arcadia which I believe was originally a reptile company I’ve been using them since they came on the scene and I have many Arcadia lights sitting around. I wonder what the difference is between the ones sold for reptiles and birds or is it the lamp? Either way thank you I will look more into the eye issues.
 
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So long as they can get away from the heat if they need to, if they seem to enjoy it I would say it’s just fine! Maybe just a few hours a day, at a maximum though. I don’t know if too much heat could damage their feathers?
Yup they are able to get away from it.
 
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So it seems like parrots need very little amount of uvb compared to the average reptile bulbs which usually starts at 5.0+ and for parrots looks like the recommended is 2.4. These bulbs are rated at 3.0 but with distance I’m sure they are less. Time to buy another uv index reader.
 
There is just so much really bad information out there about the fabled positives of UV light sources and heat lamps for Parrots. The Number of Posts within the vast library of ParrotForums.com that dispels the use of such product is huge. Yet every couple of months this question rises yet again.

In short: Heat lamps are dangerous as there is no control over their heat and as stated above, can cause overheating and blindness!

The best product for providing heat is the: Oil Filled Radiator style, which uses an electric emersion heater that warms the oil within the radiator style unit. The unit has an adjustable temperature device that allows one to make adjustments as needed.
 
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There is just so much really bad information out there about the fabled positives of UV light sources and heat lamps for Parrots. The Number of Posts within the vast library of ParrotForums.com that dispels the use of such product is huge. Yet every couple of months this question rises yet again.

In short: Heat lamps are dangerous as there is no control over their heat and as stated above, can cause overheating and blindness!

The best product for providing heat is the: Oil Filled Radiator style, which uses an electric emersion heater that warms the oil within the radiator style unit. The unit has an adjustable temperature device that allows one to make adjustments as needed.
Thanks for the response. I find heatlamps to be very easy to use there really is no need to control them so long as you are using the correct wattage the temps are usually consistent they do not malfunction to where the temps will rise and lower. When a bulb goes bad it just breaks. At least in my experience They also give animals the option to pick of warmth or to move away. Temps also can be easily monitored with thermometers and temp guns. And if you're being extra cautious you can use a thermostat. All things I personally have laying around though I don' find thermostats necessary for heat lamps. I was reading something that spoke about metabolic bone disease in birds is also a thing. Which is generally a the case of low D3. So I would think extra UVB supplements would be beneficial for birds that don't get much outdoor time? I am still very new to parrots so I'm pretty much questioning everything.
 
Thanks for the response. I find heatlamps to be very easy to use there really is no need to control them so long as you are using the correct wattage the temps are usually consistent they do not malfunction to where the temps will rise and lower. When a bulb goes bad it just breaks. At least in my experience They also give animals the option to pick of warmth or to move away. Temps also can be easily monitored with thermometers and temp guns. And if you're being extra cautious you can use a thermostat. All things I personally have laying around though I don' find thermostats necessary for heat lamps. I was reading something that spoke about metabolic bone disease in birds is also a thing. Which is generally a the case of low D3. So I would think extra UVB supplements would be beneficial for birds that don't get much outdoor time? I am still very new to parrots so I'm pretty much questioning everything.
Just wondering were the extra UVB 'supplements' get into the Parrot?
 
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Just wondering were the extra UVB 'supplements' get into the Parrot?
Good question. A quick assumption would be feet, beak, and eyes. Not sure if any UVB passes through their feathers or if the feathers themselves absorb UVB. This would explain why the recommended UVB bulbs are such a low percentage. Do you not believe they absorb any?
 
They do not absorb any. Seeing natural Sunlight as part of their vision releases the specific chemicals. It is one of the reasons that DayLight LED's causes a like chemical release. Those light bulbs cost pennies to operate compared to heat lamps and are even safer.
 
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They do not absorb any. Seeing natural Sunlight as part of their vision releases the specific chemicals. It is one of the reasons that DayLight LED's causes a like chemical release. Those light bulbs cost pennies to operate compared to heat lamps and are even safer.
Ok this is the first I'm hearing this. May I ask how you came to this conclusion? You don't think even their feet would absorb any? Or do you think its just a miniscule amount to the point where it makes no difference?
 
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Also do you believe they receive D3 in other ways or are you saying D3 is not necessary?
 
First D3 is a compound that is a result of the several common chemicals that naturally occur within a Healthy diet!

Avian Medical Books, which can be a difficult read, plus unless you have access to highly specialized Avian Eye Specialists books the references are at most a couple of sentences that is buried deep in a discussion of the eye's receptors.

I came across it as part of a quarterly CAV visit with our Amazon as we commonly talked about such things. It is the type of discussion that I strongly recommend that you build into your visit with your CAV.
 
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First D3 is a compound that is a result of the several common chemicals that naturally occur within a Healthy diet!

Avian Medical Books, which can be a difficult read, plus unless you have access to highly specialized Avian Eye Specialists books the references are at most a couple of sentences that is buried deep in a discussion of the eye's receptors.

I came across it as part of a quarterly CAV visit with our Amazon as we commonly talked about such things. It is the type of discussion that I strongly recommend that you build into your visit with your CAV.
Ok I'm not aware of many foods the give D3 that would be a parrots natural diet but if you say its a result of different chemicals that would make more sense. I get in captivity we could supplement D3 through their diet but that had me wondering about how they would get it in nature.

Though I cant say I'm a firm believer that they don't absorb UVB I will definitely be bringing this subject up in hopes to learn more about it in the future. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!
 
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I use these 2 heated products for my one parrot. He really enjoys them both. He’s always on his heated perch. I wrap the heated perch with vet wrap as originally it did burn his claws. I’ve had no issues sense.



These are interesting for sure. But this is definitely something id feel more comfortable with using a thermostat to prevent failure. Might have to give it a go. Thanks for sharing :)
 
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I use these 2 heated products for my one parrot. He really enjoys them both. He’s always on his heated perch. I wrap the heated perch with vet wrap as originally it did burn his claws. I’ve had no issues sense.



Also do you leave it on over night or turn it off?
 
Ok I'm not aware of many foods the give D3 that would be a parrots natural diet but if you say its a result of different chemicals that would make more sense. I get in captivity we could supplement D3 through their diet but that had me wondering about how they would get it in nature.

Though I cant say I'm a firm believer that they don't absorb UVB I will definitely be bringing this subject up in hopes to learn more about it in the future. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!
https://avianmedicine.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/ubv.pdf

This suggests that they can. I think supplementing vitamin D is a good thing, since parrots usually don't spend much time outside, but they can definitely get it from being outside (or with an appropriate lamp).
 

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