Hello! Introduction and Asking for Advice and Guidance

sluiceway

New member
Hi, I'm new here and also entirely new to birds, nonetheless parrots, as pets. I joined to learn what I can here and see if a parrot is a right fit for me.

I should preface this with I'm in still in the stages of considering whether to get a bird companion or not, and I joined to learn more and have access to information about their care and what's to be expected. I'm the kind of person who does a lot of planning beforehand haha. It's possible I might not even get a bird as a pet if I don't think I'd be right for one.

I guess I'll start with a little background on my family and I: at the moment we have 2 rabbits. We had a third (who I was bonded closely to) but he suddenly passed away about a month ago due to an unknown issue about his GI tract. This was a very devastating loss for my family, and me especially.
This is one reason I'm doing research into birds--I don't think I can emotionally handle getting another rabbit (at least not for a long time).

We have a VERY good vet--arguably one of the best in the state. He sees all kinds of animals, including birds (including wild ones like hummingbirds and swans to pet parrots), so I'm not worried about vet care for a potential bird friend (and my family and I are willing to do and pay for whatever is necessary for any animal that we care for).
Of course I would never allow the bird to interact with the rabbits.

The reason I bring up our pet rabbits is because of our dedication to them--something we will apply to any animal that enters our house (furry or feathered). We're essentially crazy bunny people lol.
We're used to buying organic and varied greens and fruits for them to eat, as well as checking toys in terms of if they're chew-safe or not. We also have a daily routine with them and dedicate at least 1-2 hours a day per bun.
In terms of time and patience, one of our bunnies was adopted 2 years ago, and we're still working on getting her to fully play with and trust us, all though she has made incredible improvements from being terrified and lashing out at any movement, nonetheless touch, to now being able to relax and be petted while my father tinkers with tools or cooks (all strange and scary noises to buns in general).
So we're all used to having blood drawn and scratches as well. Rehoming an animal is an absolute last step for us (unless it's truly what's best for the animal), so I'd like to be very certain about my decision to get a bird.

In short, I mean that while we are entirely new to bird care, and it is no doubt very different from bun care, we know how to be patient and do our research (something we still do, looking up new bunny care all the time).
I've also no intention to get a bird in the near future--I'd want to be ready, not just with the setup but emotionally as well. Early fall would be the absolute earliest I see myself getting another companion of any kind.


I apologize for the infodumping--I just really want to be upfront that birdcare is something very new to us and getting a bird might not even happen if we're not a right fit. I also wanted to share a bit of background for insight if we'd be a right fit.



Right, so now the fun bit:
I've done research into different parrot breeds. The reason I specify parrots is because of their intelligence and how they can bond with a person, as well as their longer lifetime (I know all of these traits vary from individual to individual, nonetheless species).

In terms of what I'm capable of providing for a bird (I intend to be the primary caregiver):
-Time: 2-4 hours a day, especially for bonding and training.
-Diet: Whatever is necessary (though we already get organic greens, fruits, and veggies).
-Cost: we're used to spending a few thousand annually for the buns, I expect a bird is about the same (plus the initial setup cost).
-Space: for the cage, indoors and we're glad to setup play areas and varied perches for the birdie.
-Safety: we already have to be wary of cables and plastics because of the buns, we also rarely use scented items (so those can easily be gotten rid of).
-Lifetime: I'd say 15 years minimum is ideal, part of the appeal of parrots to me is that they live longer than rabbits.


The problem is everything I read is so conflicting and very confusing.
Do any of you have good, accurate information on where I can learn more about individual species and their temperaments and care (books, websites, DVDs, etc.)? And perhaps some insight on a species who might be a right fit for us?


Sorry again for the length of this.:(
 

Laurasea

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Hello and welcome!

I share think link to a great article all the time. It really helps you understand how parrots think. Not just for stressed parrots. On the observation part, it does not mean get your burd home and just observe fir weeks lol. If your burd wants out the first day get them out! But I do observation all the time, to tweak cage, toy, and flock. Also lafeber web site talks about each species. Like most places they just cover the positives. But they are a good source if info.
https://lafeber.com/pet-birds/stress-reduction-for-parrot-companions/
 

Scott

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RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Welcome to the forums, thanks for entrusting us to share advice!

Appreciate your thorough introduction and insight, seems you have requisite capabilities and inclination to provide a loving, safe, and stimulating home for a parrot.

My best suggestion is to interact with a multitude of species if you can locate a rescue, sanctuary, or similar facility. Our species-specific sub-forums offer a wealth of general and first-hand accounts of 19 varieties of companion birds. The more popular candidates include cockatiels, conures, amazons, cockatoos, greys, quakers, etc. Personalities and traits vary considerably by species and individuals. You may reach a consensus while researching, though nothing substitutes for face-to-face association!

Is your vet "avian certified" or equivalent? Birds are a specialty though many practices treat them under the guise of "exotics." Some are reasonably competent despite lacking in depth training and purposeful equipment.
 

SailBoat

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Welcome to Parrotfourm!

Birds (Parrots) are lightyears different from bunnies as Parrots tend to be far more fragile than bunnies. Diets appear to be the same, but there's a critical differences. Plus bunnies tend to enjoy cuddling up with Humans, Parrots tend to not be as cuddly and some just do not like it at all.

Sounds like you are seeing an Exotic Animal Vet and like you said they are generally very good with a very wide selection of creatures. That is both a positive and a negative as they tend to be generalists. If you have an Avian Medical Professional, they are specialists in the care of Parrots and that can provide a world of advantages when one is dealing with serious problems.

Continue your research! And, if you elect to add a Parrot, let the Parrot Choose You! They are just so much better at it!
 

wrench13

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If you are still living with your folks, you may want to wait until you are out of the house and established in residence. Why? Parrots are LOUD, all the way from loud to REALLY LOUD and some apartments do not allow parrots for that reason, and those that do will give you a hard time if your neighbors complain. Parrots are Messy, even with seed catchers on cages and papers on the floor. Some individuals like to fling food , so adjacent walls and furniture can get soiled. Parrots are expensive, depending on how much they like to destroy toys. My little amazon can go through $100 a month just in toys, when the mood strikes him. Plus medical and food, which you mentioned. Parrots bite. Even the most gentle of birds can nip if startled or angry, with the larger species being able to do serious damage, like needing stiches or corrective surgery even. During mating season, all bets are off. Parrots get a flood of hormones during mating season and a lot of them do a jekyl/Hyde personality switch in a moments notice and they have no control over it. They can bite and then look around like "Huh?? What was that??". Parrots can choose a special person, irrespective of who actually likes and wanted the bird, in fact often the favorite person in the family is the one who could care less about the parrot.

But - there is no companion animal in the world like a parrot, and for those of us who love them, life would seem empty and lifeless with out them.
 
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itzjbean

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Can I ask your living situation? Do you live with your parents? Are you under the age of 20?

If you are living with family/ undder 21, I highly recommend WAITING until you 1. are done with all school, 2. have your own transportation, ability to drive places 3. have an income and adequate amount of money to constantly come in for a new bird.

Remember, you will eventually leave your family and live on your own. A parrot will need you whether or not you decide to go on a date, go out with friends, travel, all these things that young adults like to do.

Your situation may seem permanent and happy now, but in a few years (assuming you are 12-20) you will very likely leave your parents house to make your own life.

I was that kid that got a bird as a 16 year ol, and for 3 years it was terrific. And then....I GREW UP and OUT of wanting a bird for a long time! I went to college, travelled abroad, met so many people and had tons of experiences. I drank, partied and stayed out very late at night. This is something you simply can't do as a parrot owner (unless you're extremely introverted and aren't social).

I ended up rehoming my conure before I went to college, and his lifespan is 30 years. I was obsessed...until I wasn't and life moved on. I only recently got back into owning birds (about 6 years ago) and I'm 32 now. I made sure I had a permanent home, had reliable transportation, income to both feed, care and maintain health in my parrots and it's so much better when you wait until your life is settled down.
 
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Laurasea

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Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
7thThis covers bird body language, also a good read.
https://lafeber.com/pet-birds/bird-behavior/

Ps. Get fecal parasites exam done on rabbits. Coccidia can be a big hidden problem among other internal parasites.
https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/coccidia-in-rabbits

Please be careful, rabbits can carry Pasteurella, abd Pasteurella is deadly to parrots. So wash hands before touching a parrot. Do not let parrots go were rabbits go. Rabbits can have this as normal flora in their mouth so when they groom it will be in their fur. Dogs and especially cats also carry this. And I have dogs, I fo always wash my hands before petting parrots. And people who are cautious also have cats and parrots ( tho I would not) so I'm not saying you shouldn't get a parrot. I'm just giving important information to keep in mind.

https://pethelpful.com/rabbits/Causes-of-Sudden-Death-in-Pet-Rabbits

The above article is really comprehensive. Covers many diseases. This us just an excerpt on coccidia
" Coccidiosis: This is the most common cause of enteric disease in rabbits, which can also occur concurrently with other pathogens. Hepatic coccidiosis is also common [6]. The pathogens are in the genus Eimeria and parasitize parts of the intestine [1][11]. Controlling the presence of coccidia oocytes is important with younger rabbits and may be accomplished with impeccable hygiene. Unfortunately, removing the presence of coccidiosis entirely is nearly impossible [4]. Rabbits in the terminal stages of the disease may have diarrhea or constipation"
 
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noodles123

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Jul 11, 2018
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If you aren't financially independent and settled in a home, I would strongly advise against this. 1. They are super expensive, 2. they may bond to people other than you, 3. traveling when you have one is very tricky at times, 4. They need a routine like a human toddler and you have to be home to get them up and put them to bed etc around the same time each night (no more sleeping in or drinks after work),5. they can get you evicted due to noise and living in an apartment with most is not the best choice (for reasons besides noise as well), 6. The insane number of lifestyle changes and behavioral rules that will have to be followed by THE ENTIRE family....harder than it sounds when people are so used to doing things that can kill parrots in their homes.

The number of serious lifestyle changes in terms of the products you use in your home and schedules for sleep routines and the amount of time they require is intense. If you would not consider adopting a human toddler (with special needs), then think twice about a parrot because they need structure, schedules, enrichment, bed-times etc..They also struggle with change, like someone leaving for a few days or a new work schedule. Until you have a solid, long-term career, you don't know what your schedule will look like in 20-80 years, so it is best to make sure you at least have an indefinite plan for employment and housing beforehand.

Standard cleaners and non-stick pans are extremely dangerous and teflon/ptfe/pfoa can kill them even if they are on another floor with a shut door.

They need A LOT of time and attention and my concern is that the noise a parrot makes could be seriously distressing to the rabbits. They are EXTREMELY loud--- can be heard outside of a house if they start screaming (even a parakeet/budgie). Some larger species are literally as loud as a jet engine up close in terms of decibels, and screaming can go on for hours (especially when waiting out attention-seeking screaming). This type of screaming can drive anyone to the edge when it happens and you just have to wait it out.

The bacterial risk is also something to consider, because most people's homes are filled with the bacteria and rabbits carry their own.


Please read my response to the following post. My reply details health/lifestyle changes (that are so often glossed over in parrot sales) and they are extremely important as a prospective owner. Please read: http://www.parrotforums.com/conures/89117-new-bird-owner-behavior-questions.html


This is another good thread when you get done with that one: http://www.parrotforums.com/general...change-after-getting-your-first-big-bird.html


Here is one on biting/ behavior: http://www.parrotforums.com/conures/89020-conure-biting-sometimes.html <-- see my replies on ABA


Here is another behavior one- http://www.parrotforums.com/amazons/89112-help-rehoming.html <--see replies


Parrots are a MASSIVE responsibility in comparison to a cat or dog because they are just so much more complicated and our homes are far less natural for them than they are to mammals. When dealing with a flock animal with the intelligence of a pre-school to kindergarten child who is designed to fly 30-45 miles per day (who happens to have a megaphone and a chainsaw face, and can die from common products, and craves A LOT of attention, it can get complicated). They are extremely amazing and the bond you can have with them is crazy-- BUT it is so much work.


If you have the option, I would very strongly recommend volunteering at an avian rescue so that you get a sense of their volume, mess etc...Keeping in mind that birds will be more needy at home away from the stimulation of the staff/birds/commotion at the rescue.


Another thing- if you buy a baby, know that they change significantly as humans (baby vs adult) and sexually maturity can be anywhere from 1-8 years, depending on the parrot species etc. They often push away or do a 180 in terms of personality during hormonal periods and as adults, they do sometimes push away from the person they loved as a baby (much like they would in the wild). I say this because baby birds are always super quiet and easy going in comparison, so it is best that you know this upfront so that you don't get lulled into a false sense of security. I actually prefer adults because they aren't half-baked in terms of preferences etc, so it can be somewhat easier to know what you are getting (vs babies who are more unpredictable when it comes to predicting adult personality).



Never ever buy an unweaned baby and do consider adopting because they live forever and due to the extremely demanding nature of "ownership", rescues are very full.


Make sure you have a ton of time and can handle a LOT of noise/mess and also know that building trust with a parrot/training one is q lot different than what most people expect based on past experience with other types of pets. Forcing them to do things will backfire and you cannot punish them etc. Moving at their pace is VERY important and 3 weeks in human time is probably like 3 days to a parrot in terms of trust etc).
 
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Laurasea

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Its funny my read is this an adult with a family. Did I miss something thst indicated this is a young person?
 
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sluiceway

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Hello and welcome!

I share think link to a great article all the time. It really helps you understand how parrots think. Not just for stressed parrots. On the observation part, it does not mean get your burd home and just observe fir weeks lol. If your burd wants out the first day get them out! But I do observation all the time, to tweak cage, toy, and flock. Also lafeber web site talks about each species. Like most places they just cover the positives. But they are a good source if info.
https://lafeber.com/pet-birds/stress-reduction-for-parrot-companions/

Thank you for the link!

Welcome to the forums, thanks for entrusting us to share advice!

Appreciate your thorough introduction and insight, seems you have requisite capabilities and inclination to provide a loving, safe, and stimulating home for a parrot.

My best suggestion is to interact with a multitude of species if you can locate a rescue, sanctuary, or similar facility. Our species-specific sub-forums offer a wealth of general and first-hand accounts of 19 varieties of companion birds. The more popular candidates include cockatiels, conures, amazons, cockatoos, greys, quakers, etc. Personalities and traits vary considerably by species and individuals. You may reach a consensus while researching, though nothing substitutes for face-to-face association!

Is your vet "avian certified" or equivalent? Birds are a specialty though many practices treat them under the guise of "exotics." Some are reasonably competent despite lacking in depth training and purposeful equipment.
I'll look into some rescues near where I am to learn more, thanks for the suggestion!
Is there a site you'd recommend where I can look up the practice to check?

Welcome to Parrotfourm!

Birds (Parrots) are lightyears different from bunnies as Parrots tend to be far more fragile than bunnies. Diets appear to be the same, but there's a critical differences. Plus bunnies tend to enjoy cuddling up with Humans, Parrots tend to not be as cuddly and some just do not like it at all.

Sounds like you are seeing an Exotic Animal Vet and like you said they are generally very good with a very wide selection of creatures. That is both a positive and a negative as they tend to be generalists. If you have an Avian Medical Professional, they are specialists in the care of Parrots and that can provide a world of advantages when one is dealing with serious problems.

Continue your research! And, if you elect to add a Parrot, let the Parrot Choose You! They are just so much better at it!
I'll look into whether the practice has a specialist (I think they do, but it's definitely better to check).
7thThis covers bird body language, also a good read.
https://lafeber.com/pet-birds/bird-behavior/

Ps. Get fecal parasites exam done on rabbits. Coccidia can be a big hidden problem among other internal parasites.
https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/coccidia-in-rabbits

Please be careful, rabbits can carry Pasteurella, abd Pasteurella is deadly to parrots. So wash hands before touching a parrot. Do not let parrots go were rabbits go. Rabbits can have this as normal flora in their mouth so when they groom it will be in their fur. Dogs and especially catas also carry this. And I have dogs, I fo always wash my hands before petting parrots. And people who are cautious also have cats and parrots ( tho I would not) so I'm not saying you shouldn't get a parrot. I'm just giving important information to keep in mind.

https://pethelpful.com/rabbits/Causes-of-Sudden-Death-in-Pet-Rabbits

The above article is really comprehensive. Covers many diseases. This us just an excerpt on coccidia
" Coccidiosis: This is the most common cause of enteric disease in rabbits, which can also occur concurrently with other pathogens. Hepatic coccidiosis is also common [6]. The pathogens are in the genus Eimeria and parasitize parts of the intestine [1][11]. Controlling the presence of coccidia oocytes is important with younger rabbits and may be accomplished with impeccable hygiene. Unfortunately, removing the presence of coccidiosis entirely is nearly impossible [4]. Rabbits in the terminal stages of the disease may have diarrhea or constipation"
Thank you very much for the links!
We've already ruled out parasites (just had a full physical done on the other two buns to be sure they were okay and it wasn't anything transmissible--both came back all clear).
Did not know that about Pasteurella, thank you for the info! I'm of the opinion different types of animal shouldn't interact at all, but this is definitely something I'll have to consider, since one of our buns is a shedder. We're generally pretty good on cleaning and washing hands between interactions, but I'll have to think more deeply on this since the last thing I'd want to is pass something from animal to animal.

My bun who passed didn't have diarrhea or constipation, but a distended bladder and something that appeared wrong with his kidneys. Ultimately they did tests but couldn't identify what was the cause--chalked it up to one of the things we still don't know yet about rabbits.
Thank you for the info and concern regardless though!

Welcome! Take your time and decide slowly!

Thank you!
 
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sluiceway

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To answer everyone else (the post got too long so I couldn't quote directly):

I'm in my early twenties, so yes I'm young.
That said, I'm housebound due to my disability, so the likelihood of me moving out (for the foreseeable future anyway) is very unlikely. I do live with both of my parents, and the decision on getting a bird is something we'll decide all together (though they are very open to it).
I am in college, but that is strictly online-only (and I highly doubt this will change for me post-COVID).

All of our animals are "family pets", even if they bond to a specific person, so we all clean and take care of them.
I'll have to look into how birds act during mating season, though. Even if one of us does get seriously injured, we'd never give up an animal because of that, and we are prepared for injuries.
Is neutering a way to stem hormones like in other animals, or is it something not recommended in birds? I know in other animals it can have long term benefits, but I don't know how birds handle it.

We are financially stable and are always prepared for any emergency vet visits.
In terms of time, since I am housebound, I rarely leave the house for anything other than doctor visits. I'm also pretty introverted, and even when I was healthy, I avoided being too active so I could come home and hang out with the buns. Even if I do move in the future, since I actually really want the long-term commitment of an animal, I'm more than willing to take them anywhere with me.

We already have a daily routine with the rabbits (they come out in living room in the morning and night and we put them to bed at night) that everyone is involved in. Noise isn't really a concern, although we'd all prefer not to get a bird that screeches a lot (we don't mind lots of noise, it just depends on how loud that noise is). In terms of the bunnies, they're both not bothered by loud noises with a few exceptions (lightning and cooking noises), though that is also something we're taking into consideration, since we don't want to cause them undue stress.

We avoid standard cleaners as is, but I'll have to look into what we use and check if they're birdsafe (I don't think we use non-stick pans, but I'll check that, too).
I did not know that about babies! That's really good to know--especially because I'd prefer to have adopted anyways.
I'll do more research on training, too (positive reinforcement, that is).

Thank you for the links and the information!
 

noodles123

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Jul 11, 2018
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Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
What about the extreme noise and the rabbits?
 

Scott

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Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.

Laurasea

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What about the extreme noise and the rabbits?

I lived on a farm with a rabbit pen outside, only a few feet away from where my dad repaired tractor engines. And with animals its loud, sometimes very loud sometimes not. They were fine.

If you dont have a parrot screaming problem ( which would need to be fixed) then most parrots just have periods when they are about like very loud television turned up.

Happy well adjusted pet rabbits are going g to adjust fine. Wild untamed rabbits might get stressed at first. I've seen some homes were the kids noise and hyper activities woukd drive me Nutts! Lol and tge pets have adjusted.
 
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Laurasea

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Aug 2, 2018
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Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
You need to think about your idea of a parrot and what you want.

Some species like to cuddle, some like a little contact, and some really don't like to be petted in general. They still love you and love to interact with you, hang out on your, but just prefer you don't get handsie ...lol while other species never seem to get enough head scratches. Its usually the allopreeners that lije petting, like conures, quaker, Amazon, while Eclectus, IRN, CAG ( some like a little cuddle) aren't that into you having your hands on them .

I'm definitely a cuddle person, so that was important in my research of species of parrots, when I was choosing.

IRN are stunning, some can be excellent talkers, but most don't want petting, still want to be on shoulder or maybe even give a kiss. Not raised right and tamed to hand , can hsve a huge fear of hands. SilverSage has excellent articles on her web page!!! She is a member here and a breeder. So go through and read her articles!!
She breeds IRN, green cheeks, and cockatiels.
Home - Silver Sage Aviaries

This links to her article on finding the right seller.
http://silversageaviaries.com/finding-the-right-seller/
 
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Scott

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Aug 21, 2010
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San Diego, California USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Parrots
Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
You need to think about your idea of a parrot and what you want.

Some species like to cuddle, some like a little contact, and some really don't like to be petted in general. They still love you and love to interact with you, hang out on your, but just prefer you don't get handsie ...lol while other species never seem to get enough head scratches. Its usually the allopreeners that lije petting, like conures, quaker, Amazon, while Eclectus, IRN, CAG ( some like a little cuddle) aren't that into you having your hands on them .

I'm definitely a cuddle person, so that was important in my research of species of parrots, when I was choosing.

IRN are stunning, some can be excellent talkers, but most don't want petting, still want to be on shoulder or maybe even give a kiss. Not raised right and tamed to hand , can hsve a huge fear of hands. SilverSage has excellent articles on her web page!!! She is a member here and a breeder. So go through and read her articles!!
She breeds IRN, green cheeks, and cockatiels.
Home - Silver Sage Aviaries

This links to her article on finding the right seller.
FINDING THE RIGHT SELLER - Silver Sage Aviaries

Laura brings a great point! I have cuddly and more isolationist species, love and respect them all. But I strongly prefer tactile interaction, nothing for me like a cockatoo!!
 

noodles123

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Jul 11, 2018
8,141
374
Parrots
Umbrella Cockatoo- 15? years old..I think?
You need to think about your idea of a parrot and what you want.

Some species like to cuddle, some like a little contact, and some really don't like to be petted in general. They still love you and love to interact with you, hang out on your, but just prefer you don't get handsie ...lol while other species never seem to get enough head scratches. Its usually the allopreeners that lije petting, like conures, quaker, Amazon, while Eclectus, IRN, CAG ( some like a little cuddle) aren't that into you having your hands on them .

I'm definitely a cuddle person, so that was important in my research of species of parrots, when I was choosing.

IRN are stunning, some can be excellent talkers, but most don't want petting, still want to be on shoulder or maybe even give a kiss. Not raised right and tamed to hand , can hsve a huge fear of hands. SilverSage has excellent articles on her web page!!! She is a member here and a breeder. So go through and read her articles!!
She breeds IRN, green cheeks, and cockatiels.
Home - Silver Sage Aviaries

This links to her article on finding the right seller.
FINDING THE RIGHT SELLER - Silver Sage Aviaries

Laurasea- you know I respect you and this complaint isn't about what you said in general, it's about word-choice-


I just have to comment on "cuddles"-- while some like being touched more than others, this term, "cuddle" really gets to me. A bird (like a U2) is often sold on the basis of this frustrating phrase and it is often that very trait that leads to their undoing. Adult parrots (and young ones, for training purposes--babies are the exception) should be petted on the head and neck only (excluding medical necessities which merit more touching). A bird that wants to be touched and held all the time can become very frustrated when you don't provide that, but when you do, you trigger hormones and broadcast yourself as a sexually available mate.. but one who cannot truly be with them in that way....You see people who say, "my bird let me cuddle it and was the sweetest, but now he screams, plucks and won't let my wife come into the room."....That is what cuddles can do. It is a balancing act, but if an ad for a species describes that species as "cuddly" beware of the seller's motives and what that implies long-term when said bird is taken from the people it is bonded with or when it reaches sexual maturity and that touching +expectations become inappropriate and unsustainable. At a species level, it is mating related and at an individual level, it usually is as well...


It's trickier to have a bird that likes to be touched a lot because then you have to use all of your will power not to give in and snuggle, knowing that no matter how cute it seems, it is not healthy for your bird.


You should not cuddle birds and when one wants to, saying no is VERY hard, because to humans, it seems innocent...it isn't entirely.
 
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Laurasea

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Aug 2, 2018
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Neptune blue quaker (MIA), Ta-dah GCC female, Penny quaker female, Pikachu quaker female!!, Phoebe quaker female, 3 parakeets males, Burt The Burd GCC female RIP
Noodles you have valid points, and some species like U2 get wound up. But some species are allopreeners to flock and freinds and nit just mate. I do not pet back or belly, which is a turn on for many parrots. I font let them under my long hair, or under my clothes either as than can be a trigger.

It great to have other view points and experience, it makes us all smarter collectively.
 

Scott

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Aug 21, 2010
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Goffins: Gabby, Abby, Squeaky, Peanut, Popcorn / Citron: Alice / Eclectus: Angel /Timneh Grey: ET / Blue Fronted Amazon: Gonzo /

RIP Gandalf and Big Bird, you are missed.
Not all birds respond to cuddles in every setting with rush of destructive hormones, leading to unwanted/destructive behaviors. Highly dependent on the individual, species, temperament, and methods of interaction.

I've cuddled three species of cockatoos, (Goffins, Moluccan, Citron) Timneh Greys, two types of Macaws, (Greenwing, Blue & Gold) Eclectus, and Amazons without resultant sexual confusion and subsidiary behavioral distortions.

My 35 years of living with parrots have taught reverence, caution, and deliberative analysis of cause and effect. I honestly cannot identify behavioral issues with my flock as consequence of inappropriate cuddling. Not to say it does not and cannot occur, simply beware rigid, unyielding stereotypes.
 

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