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Midnightstarian

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Feb 24, 2018
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Parrots
I have a budgie, he loves playing with bells and watching me on the computer while i'm drawing. Always making sure to stop in for cuddles every couple seconds he is adorable. His name is tinker.
Hello, i'm not yet ready to get a big bird iv'e just picked up my very first bird
that's a budgie. I decided me going for a smaller bird would be the best option.
Instead of jumping into the "I'm taking care of two year old in the body of a bird" I don't feel i'm ready for that i'm sure i could manage if i wanted with doing more research for more hours of my day but i'd rather wait and see how this first smaller bird pans out instead of going in over my head. As smaller birds seemed to be highly recommended for a beginner.

But, i figured i'm researching budgies and learning about budgies
i have nothing to do at the moment and i enjoy learning so why don't i begin learning ahead of time it can't hurt anything and is a good head start to have.

So iv'e got a couple question for you larger bird owners (mostly African gray owners) Where is a good place to live with a larger bird? due to sound? and possible noise complaints? How do you handle these things when someone complains given it's a bird and there going to chirp but not everyone cares.
:(

What is your birds routine like and how much daily attention does it take?
Do you get tired? How does everything go?

Is there anything you'd suggest a person looking into before owning a bigger bird? And whats the best thing about your larger birds you've come to love?
:red: :grey:

I'm sorry for my crappy spelling and grammer i never had a great school.
;p but hey i'll learn that to on my own in time.
 
Budgies are awesome! Why would you want a bigger bird when you just got your budgie and haven’t even gotten to know him yet? I strongly disagree with the whole “starter bird” thing, because you should only get a budgie if you want a budgie, not so you can use it as a “practice bird” while you learn about birds so you can upgrade to a bigger bird. Honestly, it sounds to me like you only got this budgie to start with so you can practice on something smaller as you learn how to care for birds. That’s unfair to the budgie. Enjoy your budgie, why are you so eager to get a bigger bird? I will probably never own a bigger bird as they are so demanding, loud, and time-consuming. Please slow down and get to know your budgie, bond with him, and perhaps you’ll see how wonderful they are and you won’t need a bigger bird. As you’ll come to know, smaller parrots have BIG personalities.
 
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Your budgie is going to be much more annoying to your neighbors than most African Grey’s ;) just wait till your little chatter box starts singing!

In general though I really suggest you finish however much school you plan on getting, high school, college, med school, it’s not really about age but about stability. If you are 18 and working the family farm that you are about to take over, that’s great; stable, reasonable expectation of knowing how much time you will have for the next 30-90 years. If you are 38 and still in school, not sure of your exact career after school, that’s less stable and you should probably graduate and get your long term job first. If you are still living with your parents going to school, I wouldn’t suggest a bird at all.

There is also the financial aspect; can you afford not just the supplies, upkeep, vet bills, etc, but can you afford to be picky about your housing? Next time you move can you afford to choose pet friendly options even if they happen to be a lot more expensive? Can you afford to wait until something pet friendly opens up? Can you afford to repair the things your bird chews? I had a ringneck escape his cage and chew up huge spots in EVERY piece of my nice living room set in one afternoon. I had a macaw get out of his cage and take the trim off of one of my walls. I had a pair of Conures escape and chew down permenabtly installed curtains; between that and the chewing done by a rogue Pionus and some minor scratching the cat did while we were away, we lost almost $2000 from not getting our security deposit back, not to mention it was embarrassing as heck and may impact our ability to rent in the future. Can you afford to work only one job for the rest of your life so that you have time for your bird?

It’s really not about noise, it’s about stability and financial security; making sure that no matter what life throws at you you can keep your bird. Sure, there will be things you can’t plan for, but most people will move, change jobs, etc during their life and THOSE THINGS should be planned for ahead of time.


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Budgies are awesome! Why would you want a bigger bird when you just got your budgie and haven’t even gotten to know him yet? I strongly disagree with the whole “starter bird” thing, because you should only get a budgie if you want a budgie, not so you can use it as a “practice bird” while you learn about birds so you can upgrade to a bigger bird. Honestly, it sounds to me like you only got this budgie to start with so you can practice on something smaller as you learn how to care for birds. That’s unfair to the budgie. Enjoy your budgie, why are you so eager to get a bigger bird? I will probably never own a bigger bird as they are so demanding, loud, and time-consuming. Please slow down and get to know your budgie, bond with him, and perhaps you’ll see how wonderful they are and you won’t need a bigger bird. As you’ll come to know, smaller parrots have BIG personalities.


No of course not iv'e done loads of research on the budgie
yes i got a starter bird but because that's what i stand by and what i think i should have done not because i want to use it as a starter bird.
Sounds to me like you've made a huge assumption from a limited information. I wish to own a bigger bird someday yes because it'd be interesting and i like birds always have.
You also made the assumption of me going to fast when i already stated on the first line of my (posting: Hello, i'm not yet ready to get a big bird iv'e just picked up my very first bird)
Also stating i'm not ready for a larger bird.
 
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Your budgie is going to be much more annoying to your neighbors than most African Grey’s ;) just wait till your little chatter box starts singing!

In general though I really suggest you finish however much school you plan on getting, high school, college, med school, it’s not really about age but about stability. If you are 18 and working the family farm that you are about to take over, that’s great; stable, reasonable expectation of knowing how much time you will have for the next 30-90 years. If you are 38 and still in school, not sure of your exact career after school, that’s less stable and you should probably graduate and get your long term job first. If you are still living with your parents going to school, I wouldn’t suggest a bird at all.

There is also the financial aspect; can you afford not just the supplies, upkeep, vet bills, etc, but can you afford to be picky about your housing? Next time you move can you afford to choose pet friendly options even if they happen to be a lot more expensive? Can you afford to wait until something pet friendly opens up? Can you afford to repair the things your bird chews? I had a ringneck escape his cage and chew up huge spots in EVERY piece of my nice living room set in one afternoon. I had a macaw get out of his cage and take the trim off of one of my walls. I had a pair of Conures escape and chew down permenabtly installed curtains; between that and the chewing done by a rogue Pionus and some minor scratching the cat did while we were away, we lost almost $2000 from not getting our security deposit back, not to mention it was embarrassing as heck and may impact our ability to rent in the future. Can you afford to work only one job for the rest of your life so that you have time for your bird?

It’s really not about noise, it’s about stability and financial security; making sure that no matter what life throws at you you can keep your bird. Sure, there will be things you can’t plan for, but most people will move, change jobs, etc during their life and THOSE THINGS should be planned for ahead of time.


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Yea, i can afford the budgie no problem
i don't live with my parents :)
And i do expect for the chirping to get louder but it's already fairly high
even if it got higher i haven't noise complaint yet.

I'm not curious on larger birds at the moment just for the sake of learning
because i like learning. Maybe that makes me a little bit different i don't know and i don't care but i like to learn about whatever i can whenever i can.
I do like hearing about how costly it is though and what it's chewed it gives me a very good idea on what to expect if a larger bird is ever something i decide to get as a pet. I do plan to get one eventually, jobs are something i'd do at home as i'm not good with people and prefer to be alone more often.
So i'm not to concerned about jobs as that's something i can manage or figure out as time goes on. But again thanks for the comment, i enjoy listening to the stories and everything. I'm actually not concerned about the sound believe it or not it was more me trying to see others perspectives then worried about me and my own although i can see how that is easily misunderstood.
 
Bugies are amazing members of the parrot family. A budgie holds the world record for number of words spoken, and they can be taught the same tricks as Salty does, just with smaller props.
 
Hi, and welcome! Your budgie can indeed teach you much about what it's like to own a bigger parrot. They are tiny, high-speed parrots. They talk fast, they play fast, they do everything at a higher pitch and faster speed - but they are 100% parrot. They want to be with you, will bond with you, will chew things up, will preen their feathers just like a big bird, sleep fluffed up like a big bird, make noise in the morning like a big bird, use contact calls, and bite!

The best way to learn from him is to observe him carefully as an individual, and not as a generic budgie. He has a personality and preferences that are all his own. Look at some of the cool videos - Disco the Parakeet is famous and has his own YouTube channel. Or check out this adorable guy!
https://www.instagram.com/p/BfiSHtpDvPT/?taken-by=teamyowax

Learn what he likes, teach him to talk, teach him to do tricks, and you will be miles ahead when it comes time to work with a larger bird. Good luck to you both!
 
Bugies are amazing members of the parrot family. A budgie holds the world record for number of words spoken, and they can be taught the same tricks as Salty does, just with smaller props.

and smaller poops. LOL:p
 

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